Segregation and Tule Lake

In July 1943, Tule Lake concentration camp was designated as a segregation center for those the camp authorities considered "disloyal" as a result of their answers on the mandatory "loyalty questionnaire." In September 1943, "loyal" Japanese Americans from Tule Lake began departing for other camps and "disloyal" Japanese Americans from other camps started arriving at Tule Lake. The number of guards increased from a few hundred to 930 and an eight-foot high double fence was erected. The camp's capacity was 15,000 but the peak population reached 18,789 as 6,249 original "loyal" Japaense Americans chose to stay rather than be uprooted again.

World War II (66)
Resistance and dissidence (69)
Segregation and Tule Lake (217)

217 items
George Nakano Interview I Segment 8 (ddr-densho-1000-359-8)
vh George Nakano Interview I Segment 8 (ddr-densho-1000-359-8)
Father's participation in the Hoshidan at Tule Lake

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

Kenge Kobayashi Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-37-10)
vh Kenge Kobayashi Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-37-10)
Atmosphere at Tule Lake concentration camp during the "segregation" period
Kenge Kobayashi Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-37-11)
vh Kenge Kobayashi Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-37-11)
Riots at Tule Lake concentration camp, the Okamoto shooting
Kenge Kobayashi Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-37-12)
vh Kenge Kobayashi Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-37-12)
Implementation of martial law by camp administrators during the riots at Tule Lake concentration camp
Kenge Kobayashi Segment 14 (ddr-densho-1000-37-14)
vh Kenge Kobayashi Segment 14 (ddr-densho-1000-37-14)
Siblings coerced to renounce U.S. citizenship at Tule Lake concentration camp
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 34 (ddr-densho-1000-164-34)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 34 (ddr-densho-1000-164-34)
Observing changes in the pro-Japan organizations during the institution of the renunciation program
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 35 (ddr-densho-1000-164-35)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 35 (ddr-densho-1000-164-35)
Father arrested by the FBI and removed from Tule Lake along with sixty-nine others
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 31 (ddr-densho-1000-164-31)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 31 (ddr-densho-1000-164-31)
Joining father's organization, the Kenkyu Seinen Dan: shaving head, forming a bugle corps, and marching in drills
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-164-26)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-164-26)
Arrival at Tule Lake, witnessing confusion as many people are arriving and leaving
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 37 (ddr-densho-1000-164-37)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 37 (ddr-densho-1000-164-37)
Witnessing the frenzy of people applying to renounce their U.S. citizenship
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 28 (ddr-densho-1000-164-28)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 28 (ddr-densho-1000-164-28)
Father forms a small group to propose to the camp administration the idea of "resegregating" Tule Lake, separating the pro-Japanese factions from everyone else
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 29 (ddr-densho-1000-164-29)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 29 (ddr-densho-1000-164-29)
Father circulates a petition to support his resegregation idea after the camp administration rejects it; obtains 6,500 signatures
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 30 (ddr-densho-1000-164-30)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 30 (ddr-densho-1000-164-30)
Formation of the Sokoku Kenkyu Seinen Dan, the Young Men's Association for the Study of the Motherland
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 25 (ddr-densho-1000-164-25)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 25 (ddr-densho-1000-164-25)
Talking with father on journey to Tule Lake concentration camp, the so-called "segregation camp"
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 33 (ddr-densho-1000-164-33)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 33 (ddr-densho-1000-164-33)
A shift in the objectives and leadership of the pro-Japan organizations after announcement that people would be allowed to renounce their U.S. citizenship
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 36 (ddr-densho-1000-164-36)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 36 (ddr-densho-1000-164-36)
Personal feelings after father's arrest: angry, but "kind of proud"
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 27 (ddr-densho-1000-164-27)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 27 (ddr-densho-1000-164-27)
Witnessing the "chaos" of Tule Lake: disputes between factions of people
Nancy Kyoko Oda Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-463-3)
vh Nancy Kyoko Oda Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-463-3)
Family's wartime story: parents in Poston, Colorado, then father was transferred to Tule Lake and held in the stockade
Tokio Yamane Interview Segment 28 (ddr-densho-1000-432-28)
vh Tokio Yamane Interview Segment 28 (ddr-densho-1000-432-28)
Charged with being "disloyal" and segregated to Tule Lake (Japanese language)

This interview was conducted in Japanese. The transcript is a translation of the original interview. This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material ...

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