Segregation and Tule Lake

In July 1943, Tule Lake concentration camp was designated as a segregation center for those the camp authorities considered "disloyal" as a result of their answers on the mandatory "loyalty questionnaire." In September 1943, "loyal" Japanese Americans from Tule Lake began departing for other camps and "disloyal" Japanese Americans from other camps started arriving at Tule Lake. The number of guards increased from a few hundred to 930 and an eight-foot high double fence was erected. The camp's capacity was 15,000 but the peak population reached 18,789 as 6,249 original "loyal" Japaense Americans chose to stay rather than be uprooted again.

Segregation and Tule Lake (205)

205 items
The Newell Star, Vol. I, No. 14 (June 1, 1944) (ddr-densho-284-21)
doc The Newell Star, Vol. I, No. 14 (June 1, 1944) (ddr-densho-284-21)
Selected article titles: "Residents Pay Solemn Tribute at Final Rites for Okamoto: Outdoor Funeral Attended by 9000" (pp. 1-2), "Further Group Movements to Tule Lake Discontinued" (p. 1), "Jail at 1808 for Drunks, Malfeasance" (p. 2), and "12 Buddhist Priests Added; Initial Sermons on Sunday" (p. 3).
The Newell Star, Vol. I, No. 10 (May 4, 1944) (ddr-densho-284-15)
doc The Newell Star, Vol. I, No. 10 (May 4, 1944) (ddr-densho-284-15)
Selected article titles: "Repatriates Should Notify WRA and Spanish Embassy" (p. 1), "Reopening of Leupp Not Confirmed Here; Best" (p. 2), and "Tule Hardball Season Opens; Nippons Dump Manzanar Nine, 12-6" (pp. 5-6).
Chizuko Norton Segment 29 (ddr-densho-1000-73-29)
vh Chizuko Norton Segment 29 (ddr-densho-1000-73-29)
Conditions in Tule Lake after it became a "segregation center"
Richard E. Yamashiro Interview Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-333-16)
vh Richard E. Yamashiro Interview Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-333-16)
Transferring to Tule Lake when it was a segregation camp

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of ...

Kunio Otani Segment 20 (ddr-densho-1000-75-20)
vh Kunio Otani Segment 20 (ddr-densho-1000-75-20)
Tule Lake concentration camp becomes a "segregation center"
Toshikazu
vh Toshikazu "Tosh" Okamoto II Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1000-248-4)
Atmosphere in Tule Lake during its transition to a segregation camp
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 35 (ddr-densho-1000-164-35)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 35 (ddr-densho-1000-164-35)
Father arrested by the FBI and removed from Tule Lake along with sixty-nine others
Arthur Ogami Interview Segment 21 (ddr-densho-1000-154-21)
vh Arthur Ogami Interview Segment 21 (ddr-densho-1000-154-21)
Involvement in the Hokoku Seinendan, a militaristic, pro-Japanese group in Tule Lake
Kenge Kobayashi Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-37-11)
vh Kenge Kobayashi Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-37-11)
Riots at Tule Lake concentration camp, the Okamoto shooting
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 33 (ddr-densho-1000-164-33)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 33 (ddr-densho-1000-164-33)
A shift in the objectives and leadership of the pro-Japan organizations after announcement that people would be allowed to renounce their U.S. citizenship
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 27 (ddr-densho-1000-164-27)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 27 (ddr-densho-1000-164-27)
Witnessing the "chaos" of Tule Lake: disputes between factions of people
Shig Miyaki Interview Segment 21 (ddr-densho-1000-259-21)
vh Shig Miyaki Interview Segment 21 (ddr-densho-1000-259-21)
Participating in Seinendan activities in camp

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

Hiroshi Kashiwagi Interview Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1000-165-19)
vh Hiroshi Kashiwagi Interview Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1000-165-19)
Memories of turmoil and violence in Tule Lake: work stoppage, martial law
Hiroshi Kashiwagi Interview Segment 18 (ddr-densho-1000-165-18)
vh Hiroshi Kashiwagi Interview Segment 18 (ddr-densho-1000-165-18)
Experiencing changes as Tule Lake was converted into a "segregation center"
[Ray R. Best had close call with detention camp mob], biographical news article on Tule Lake Camp Director Raymond Best (ddr-csujad-2-39)
doc [Ray R. Best had close call with detention camp mob], biographical news article on Tule Lake Camp Director Raymond Best (ddr-csujad-2-39)
Biographical newspaper article about Tule Lake Camp Director Raymond R. Best and his role during the November 1943 protests at the camp, lead to martial law. Describes how his life was in danger during the protests and his diplomatic work after the camp closed. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project ...
Letter from Mrs. Sakazaki to Raymond Best, Director of Tule Lake Camp (ddr-csujad-2-12)
doc Letter from Mrs. Sakazaki to Raymond Best, Director of Tule Lake Camp (ddr-csujad-2-12)
Letter from Mrs. Sakazaki to Raymond Best, Director of Tule Lake Camp, requesting for the release of her husband, Tokuraro Sakazaki ,from the army stockades at Tule Lake Camp. Includes her letter in Japanese and notes about her interpreter and situation. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: sjs_sch_0012
Letter from residents to Ramond Best, Director of Tule Lake Camp, February 18, 1944 (ddr-csujad-2-10)
doc Letter from residents to Ramond Best, Director of Tule Lake Camp, February 18, 1944 (ddr-csujad-2-10)
Letter from residents requesting the release of two incarerees: Wataru Obara, and Hiroichi Shimamura, detained in the army stockades at Tule Lake Camp. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: sjs_sch_0010
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