Segregation and Tule Lake

In July 1943, Tule Lake concentration camp was designated as a segregation center for those the camp authorities considered "disloyal" as a result of their answers on the mandatory "loyalty questionnaire." In September 1943, "loyal" Japanese Americans from Tule Lake began departing for other camps and "disloyal" Japanese Americans from other camps started arriving at Tule Lake. The number of guards increased from a few hundred to 930 and an eight-foot high double fence was erected. The camp's capacity was 15,000 but the peak population reached 18,789 as 6,249 original "loyal" Japaense Americans chose to stay rather than be uprooted again.

Segregation and Tule Lake (205)

205 items
Tom Akashi Interview Segment 30 (ddr-densho-1000-164-30)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 30 (ddr-densho-1000-164-30)
Formation of the Sokoku Kenkyu Seinen Dan, the Young Men's Association for the Study of the Motherland
Kazie Good Interview Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-429-13)
vh Kazie Good Interview Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-429-13)
Being harassed and beaten up by other Japanese Americans in camp
Letter from Aiko Takaoka to Ramond Best, Director of Tule Lake Camp, February 1, 1944 (ddr-csujad-2-5)
doc Letter from Aiko Takaoka to Ramond Best, Director of Tule Lake Camp, February 1, 1944 (ddr-csujad-2-5)
Letter from Aiko Takaoka to Raymond Best, Director of Tule Lake Camp, requesting the release of her brother, Yoshio Takaoka from the army stockades at Tule Lake Camp. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: sjs_sch_0005
Translation of poster at Tule Lake Camp regarding repatriation and loyalty to Japan (ddr-csujad-2-43)
doc Translation of poster at Tule Lake Camp regarding repatriation and loyalty to Japan (ddr-csujad-2-43)
Translation of a poster within washrooms at the Tule Lake Incarceration Camp. Describes inadequate treatment of incarcerees compared to other camps, loyalty and repatriation to Japan, and the need to quell "disgraceful behavior" such as violence. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: sjs_sch_0043
Tokio Yamane Interview Segment 25 (ddr-densho-1000-432-25)
vh Tokio Yamane Interview Segment 25 (ddr-densho-1000-432-25)
Demanding that the American flag be removed upon arrival at Tule Lake (Japanese language)

This interview was conducted in Japanese. The transcript is a translation of the original interview. This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed ...

Segregees boarding trucks (ddr-densho-37-264)
img Segregees boarding trucks (ddr-densho-37-264)
Original WRA caption: Segregees board trucks for processing center.
Hoshidan members leaving Tule Lake (ddr-densho-37-196)
img Hoshidan members leaving Tule Lake (ddr-densho-37-196)
Original WRA caption: The 25 lay-down strikers leave the stockade gate, under heavy guard, to march the approximate mile to the special Department of Justice train, 6-24-45. (Besides losing their clothes, they also "lost face" with possible sympathizers remaining in the colony, and caused the Hokoku and Hoshi Dan to become laughing stock of the colony.)
Japanese American loading freight train (ddr-densho-37-265)
img Japanese American loading freight train (ddr-densho-37-265)
Original WRA caption: Volunteer evacuee worker helps load freight on train.
Letter to a Nisei man from his brother (ddr-densho-153-80)
doc Letter to a Nisei man from his brother (ddr-densho-153-80)
Excerpt: "Ive been trying to get this letter off for about the last two weeks but everytime I start, something else turns up." Sent from Manzanar concentration camp, California, to Chicago, Illinois.
API