Work and jobs

Both Issei and Nisei took jobs within the camps, at wages set not to exceed soldiers' pay: $12 per month for unskilled labor, $16 for skilled labor, and $19 for professional employees. WRA staff was paid much more for the same jobs. Though public opinion mandated such low pay, dissatisfied Japanese Americans objected to losing their right to make a decent living. They had to use their sparse income for necessities, such as warm clothing and shoes.

World War II (66)
Concentration camps (595)
Work and jobs (669)

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669 items
Japanese Americans threshing peas (ddr-densho-37-594)
img Japanese Americans threshing peas (ddr-densho-37-594)
Original WRA caption: Gila River Relocation Center, Rivers, Arizona. Threshing green eating peas for seed. Eleven acres of peas are grown here for their seed, and yield 10 to 12 sacks per acre. This is an extremely high yield.
Camp kitchen crew (ddr-densho-37-619)
img Camp kitchen crew (ddr-densho-37-619)
Original WRA caption: Jerome Relocation Center, Denson, Arkansas. The Block 7 kitchen crew pauses for a picture in the early afternoon.
Cabbage field (ddr-densho-37-48)
img Cabbage field (ddr-densho-37-48)
Original WRA caption: Cabbage field. Many incarceration camps raised livestock such as chickens and pigs, as well as vegetables, for camp consumption.
Japanese American preparing vegetable hot beds (ddr-densho-37-626)
img Japanese American preparing vegetable hot beds (ddr-densho-37-626)
Original WRA caption: Jerome Relocation Center, Denson, Arkansas. A young farm assistant preparing hot beds at the Jerome Center, where former west coast residents of Japanese ancestry now reside. The center farm activities will include the raising of any vegetable for center use.
Japanese Americans making tofu (ddr-densho-37-156)
img Japanese Americans making tofu (ddr-densho-37-156)
Original WRA caption: The cooked beans are poured into a fine-meshed sack and water is added. Squeezing the sack the fiberous substance is held back and the rest of the precipitate is squeezed into a barrel. Into this strained mash or curd, brine is added to cause it to precipitate. This factory is operated by the …
Japanese Americans working on camp newspaper (ddr-densho-37-465)
img Japanese Americans working on camp newspaper (ddr-densho-37-465)
Original WRA caption: Tule Lake Relocation Center, Newell, California. Evacuee artists who work on the Tulean Dispatch.
Japanese American farm workers (ddr-densho-37-379)
img Japanese American farm workers (ddr-densho-37-379)
Original WRA caption: Tule Lake Relocation Center, Newell, California. 10:30 A.M. farm workers' siesta.
Japanese Americans making tofu (ddr-densho-37-154)
img Japanese Americans making tofu (ddr-densho-37-154)
Original WRA caption: The paste-like crushed bean mash is cooked thoroughly in the big vat shown in the picture and constantly stirred. This tofu (pronounced To-o-fu) factory is operated by the Tule Lake Co-op.
Japanese American firemen playing cards (ddr-densho-37-179)
img Japanese American firemen playing cards (ddr-densho-37-179)
Original WRA caption: The evacuee firemen spend their recreation moments, as do all firemen, by playing a good old American game of cards.
Japanese Americans clearing land (ddr-densho-37-567)
img Japanese Americans clearing land (ddr-densho-37-567)
Original WRA caption: Topaz, Utah. Volunteer workers clearing sagebrush and wild guayule from a section of the lands of the Topaz Relocation Center to be used for truck gardening and animal foreage acreage.
Japanese American auto mechanic (ddr-densho-37-557)
img Japanese American auto mechanic (ddr-densho-37-557)
Original WRA caption: Topaz, Utah. A young resident at the Topaz Relocation Center adjusting a carburetor on a well worn War Relocation Authority truck.
Construction of barracks (ddr-densho-37-563)
img Construction of barracks (ddr-densho-37-563)
Original WRA caption: Topaz, Utah. Young volunteer workers of Japanese parentage haul lumber for the construction of barracks and interiors at he Topaz Relocation Center.
Shoe repair shop (ddr-densho-37-148)
img Shoe repair shop (ddr-densho-37-148)
Original WRA caption: All shoe repair work for the entire colony is done in this shop which is under the Tule Lake Co-operative Enterprise, Inc.
Japanese Americans harvesting corn (ddr-densho-37-711)
img Japanese Americans harvesting corn (ddr-densho-37-711)
Original WRA caption: Harvesting the first corn crop at the Minidoka Relocation Center from fields which were covered with sagebrush last spring. Note the sleeves and the cloth and head cloth work by the evacuee woman on the left to protect her from the sun.
Japanese Americans cutting timber (ddr-densho-37-549)
img Japanese Americans cutting timber (ddr-densho-37-549)
Original WRA caption: Rohwer Relocation Center, McGehee, Arkansas. Much of the timber cleared from reclaimed farm lands is used for fuel to heat barracks homes. Cutting and chopping is done by volunteer workers enlisted by block managers, to provide fuel for each individual block. Each capable resident is expected to contribute his share of time to …
Japanese Americans harvesting mustard (ddr-densho-37-408)
img Japanese Americans harvesting mustard (ddr-densho-37-408)
Original WRA caption: Rohwer Relocation Center, McGehee, Arkansas. One of many truck loads of mustard being harvested by the residents of the Rohwer Relocation Center on the land cultivated by the evacuees.
Japanese Americans harvesting cabbages (ddr-densho-37-807)
img Japanese Americans harvesting cabbages (ddr-densho-37-807)
Original WRA caption: Jerome Relocation Center, Dermott, Arkansas. Cutting cabbages which have been left for winter harvest.
Construction of an irrigation gate (ddr-densho-37-566)
img Construction of an irrigation gate (ddr-densho-37-566)
Original WRA caption: Topaz, Utah. Vocational training class in farm construction gets some real action at the Topaz Relocation Center. Picture shows them getting practical class work in construction of irrigation gate.
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