Work and jobs

Both Issei and Nisei took jobs within the camps, at wages set not to exceed soldiers' pay: $12 per month for unskilled labor, $16 for skilled labor, and $19 for professional employees. WRA staff was paid much more for the same jobs. Though public opinion mandated such low pay, dissatisfied Japanese Americans objected to losing their right to make a decent living. They had to use their sparse income for necessities, such as warm clothing and shoes.

World War II (66)
Concentration camps (592)
Work and jobs (667)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Amache Silk Screen Shop

667 items
Japanese American farmers eating lunch (ddr-densho-37-363)
img Japanese American farmers eating lunch (ddr-densho-37-363)
Original WRA caption: A view in the lunch shed at the farm. Trucks from the kitchens bring hot lunches to the workers.
Japanese Americans working on camp water mains (ddr-densho-37-556)
img Japanese Americans working on camp water mains (ddr-densho-37-556)
Original WRA caption: Topaz, Utah. Young volunteer workers, residents at the Topaz Relocation Center, completing the water mains.
Two Japanese American farmers (ddr-densho-37-85)
img Two Japanese American farmers (ddr-densho-37-85)
Original WRA caption: Two women of Japanese ancestry pause from their potatoe harvesting to pose for this picture.
Butcher house (ddr-densho-37-347)
img Butcher house (ddr-densho-37-347)
Original WRA caption: A view in the slaughter house and butcher shop. Hogs, which are grown in the evacuee run hog farm, are slaughtered here, for consumption by the residents of the center.
Japanese American workers loading scrap lumber (ddr-densho-37-555)
img Japanese American workers loading scrap lumber (ddr-densho-37-555)
Original WRA caption: Topaz, Utah. A group of volunteer workers at the Topaz Relocation Center gathering a truck load of scrap lumber from the contractor's scrap pile.
Japanese Americans cutting seed potatoes (ddr-densho-37-353)
img Japanese Americans cutting seed potatoes (ddr-densho-37-353)
Original WRA caption: Seed potato cutting at the cutting sheds of the Tule Lake Relocation Center farm. 7,500 sacks of potatoes will be cut by 48 workers in 2-1/2 weeks. This will be enough seeds to plant the 600 acres.
Japanese American carpenter (ddr-densho-37-383)
img Japanese American carpenter (ddr-densho-37-383)
Original WRA caption: Tule Lake Relocation Center, Newell, California. Cabinet worker's saw is expertly used by Jime Kabayashi, 62, on the interior construction of general store Number 2 at this War Relocation Authority center for evacuees of Japanese descent. Jime, prior to evacuation, had resided in Sacramento for 24 years and has been a carpenter for ...
Hair salon (ddr-densho-37-149)
img Hair salon (ddr-densho-37-149)
Original WRA caption: This beauty parlour is operated by the Tule Lake Co-operative Enterprise, Inc. Patrons are charged a nominal fee.
Japanese Americans harvesting onions (ddr-densho-37-710)
img Japanese Americans harvesting onions (ddr-densho-37-710)
Original WRA caption: High school boys and girls of Hunt pull onions on the project farm during harvest vacation.
Coal loading operation (ddr-densho-37-508)
img Coal loading operation (ddr-densho-37-508)
Original WRA caption: Granada Relocation Center, Amache, Colorado. Coal loading machine in operation at Granada Relocation Center.
Japanese American dragline operator (ddr-densho-37-530)
img Japanese American dragline operator (ddr-densho-37-530)
Original WRA caption: Rohwer Relocation Center, McGehee, Arkansas. Larry Sato, a former southern California dragline operator, back at his old trade on a dragline at the Rohwer Relocation Center. The task of maintaining the center and its facilities, and distribution of fuel, food supplies, etc., is carried on by workers recruited from center residents, former west ...
Japanese American spinning thread (ddr-densho-37-529)
img Japanese American spinning thread (ddr-densho-37-529)
Original WRA caption: Rohwer Relocation Center, McGehee, Arkansas. There is provision for weaving and spinning at Rohwer Relocation Center. This man has grown his own cotton on a little plot by his barrack. Here he is spinning it into thread preparatory to weaving it.
Japanese Americans making tofu (ddr-densho-37-155)
img Japanese Americans making tofu (ddr-densho-37-155)
Original WRA caption: The precipitate is put into forms and pressed. Later it is cut into smaller cakes and kept in water as shown. Tofu is a kind of "bean curd" considered essential to the Japanese diet. Other pictures in this group show the various processes in the manufacture of this product. To preserve it is ...
Hog farm (ddr-densho-37-80)
img Hog farm (ddr-densho-37-80)
Original WRA caption: Tule Lake Relocation Center, Newell, California. A view of hogs at the temporary hog farm at this relocation center.
Japanese American feeding dairy calves (ddr-densho-37-602)
img Japanese American feeding dairy calves (ddr-densho-37-602)
Original WRA caption: Gila River Relocation Center, Rivers, Arizona. Y.T. Sakoda, former vegetable worker from Guadalupe, California, is now enrolled in the dairy school, here. He is shown feeding calves.
Japanese American mechanics (ddr-densho-37-570)
img Japanese American mechanics (ddr-densho-37-570)
Original WRA caption: Topaz, Utah. Keeping well warm motor equipment running is a problem confronting these two Nisei volunteer mechanics, at the Topaz Relocation Center.
Camp irrigation workers (ddr-densho-37-729)
img Camp irrigation workers (ddr-densho-37-729)
Original WRA caption: Establishing irrigation controls, land reclamation.
Barber shop (ddr-densho-37-384)
img Barber shop (ddr-densho-37-384)
Original WRA caption: Tule Lake Relocation Center, Newell, California. Motimer Cooke, Supervisor of Community Enterprises, enjoys the first hair-cut given in the barber shop at this War Relocation Authority center. Frances Imura, evacuee from Sacramento is the barber.
Poultry farm (ddr-densho-37-180)
img Poultry farm (ddr-densho-37-180)
Original WRA caption: M. Nakamura, poultry caretaker, and former farmer of Sacramento, California, feeds four months old chickens. It is anticipated, that the chickens grown here, will furnish the residents of the project with all the eggs and chicken meat which will be consumed. These chickens were raised from baby chicks.
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