Work and jobs

Both Issei and Nisei took jobs within the camps, at wages set not to exceed soldiers' pay: $12 per month for unskilled labor, $16 for skilled labor, and $19 for professional employees. WRA staff was paid much more for the same jobs. Though public opinion mandated such low pay, dissatisfied Japanese Americans objected to losing their right to make a decent living. They had to use their sparse income for necessities, such as warm clothing and shoes.

Work and jobs (546)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Amache Silk Screen Shop

545 items
Nurses (ddr-hmwf-1-589)
img Nurses (ddr-hmwf-1-589)
Nurses, in uniform, gathered together outside of building (Nurses Quarter)
Collecting coal (ddr-hmwf-1-72)
img Collecting coal (ddr-hmwf-1-72)
"Coal 29-27, Jan 11, 1944 morning" as described on back, Super xx Super Ikonta B DK20'45' D76-20'
Barracks Building (ddr-hmwf-1-498)
img Barracks Building (ddr-hmwf-1-498)
"29-28 Laundry Jan 25-1944" as described on back
Men Working (ddr-hmwf-1-540)
img Men Working (ddr-hmwf-1-540)
"Sidney, 12/30/1944" as described on back, men out working in a field
Nurses (ddr-hmwf-1-194)
img Nurses (ddr-hmwf-1-194)
"Japanese nurses with baby boy, Katsuye request Sept. 1943"
Collecting coal (ddr-hmwf-1-63)
img Collecting coal (ddr-hmwf-1-63)
"Collecting coal outside barracks, woman walking with dog in background"
Men Working (ddr-hmwf-1-541)
img Men Working (ddr-hmwf-1-541)
"Sidney Kashiwabara, 12/30/1944" as descibed on back, group of men together in field
Nurses (ddr-hmwf-1-193)
img Nurses (ddr-hmwf-1-193)
"Caucasion nurses in front of Nurses Quarter"
Letter to Molly Wilson from Mary Murakami (October 6, 1942) (ddr-janm-1-29)
doc Letter to Molly Wilson from Mary Murakami (October 6, 1942) (ddr-janm-1-29)
Handwritten letter to Molly Wilson from Mary Murakami (October 6, 1942).
Letter (with envelope) to Molly Wilson from Mary Murakami (February 26, 1943) (ddr-janm-1-33)
doc Letter (with envelope) to Molly Wilson from Mary Murakami (February 26, 1943) (ddr-janm-1-33)
Handwritten letter to Molly Wilson from Mary Murakami (February 26, 1943). Envelope is postmarked February 27, 1943 from the Poston (Colorado River) Incarceration Camp in Parker, Arizona.
Japanese American workers digging a ditch (ddr-densho-151-342)
img Japanese American workers digging a ditch (ddr-densho-151-342)
Original caption: San Bruno, California. Maintenance work, repair and construction is done by volunteer evacuee workers. The wages are $8.00 per month for 48 hours per week. This gang of boys and young men are digging a drainage tank along the front of one of the barracks.
Japanese American in field (ddr-densho-151-375)
img Japanese American in field (ddr-densho-151-375)
Original caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Ogura Shuichi, born in Pasadena. He attended Pasadena Junior College and was a visiting student at the California Institute of Technology. He is now working as a plant statistician for the guayule rubber experiment project at this War Relocation Authority center for evacuees of Japanese ancestry.
Japanese American working in lath house (ddr-densho-151-470)
img Japanese American working in lath house (ddr-densho-151-470)
Original caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. An evacuee is shown in the lath house sorting seedlings for tranplanting. These plants are year-old seedlings from the Salinas Experiment Station.
Japanese Americans tending crops (ddr-densho-151-35)
img Japanese Americans tending crops (ddr-densho-151-35)
Original WRA caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry are growing flourishing truck crops for their own use in their "hobby gardens." These crops are grown in plots 10 x 50 feet between blocks of barrack at this War Relocation Authority Center.
Field crew foreman (ddr-densho-151-390)
img Field crew foreman (ddr-densho-151-390)
Original caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Johnny Fukazawa, foreman of fields Numbers 3, 4, 5, and 6, heading a 20-man field crew on the farm project, says there are many problems they have to solve in their agricultural work at this War Relocation Authority center for evacuees of Japanese ancestry.
Japanese American working in lath house (ddr-densho-151-379)
img Japanese American working in lath house (ddr-densho-151-379)
Original caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Guayule beds in the lath house at the Manzanar Relocation Center.
Japanese Americans making camouflage nets (ddr-densho-151-413)
img Japanese Americans making camouflage nets (ddr-densho-151-413)
Original caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Making camouflage nets for the War Department. This is one of several War and Navy Department projects carried on by persons of Japanese ancestry in relocation centers.
Paul Bannai Interview I Segment 20 (ddr-densho-1000-128-20)
vh Paul Bannai Interview I Segment 20 (ddr-densho-1000-128-20)
Being paid to work in camp, outside friends not allowed to visit
Sue K. Embrey Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-6-3)
vh Sue K. Embrey Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-6-3)
Work in Manzanar concentration camp: making camouflage nets, writing for the Free Press

This interview was conducted at the Voices of Japanese American Redress Conference, held on the UCLA campus and sponsored by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center and the UCLA School of Public Policy and Social Research. Because of the full conference schedule, our ...

Marianne West Interview Segment 5 (ddr-densho-1000-120-5)
vh Marianne West Interview Segment 5 (ddr-densho-1000-120-5)
Life in the Tule Lake concentration camp, working as a "block mother"

This interview took place at the 2000 Tule Lake Pilgrimage in Klamath Falls, Oregon.

API