Work and jobs

Both Issei and Nisei took jobs within the camps, at wages set not to exceed soldiers' pay: $12 per month for unskilled labor, $16 for skilled labor, and $19 for professional employees. WRA staff was paid much more for the same jobs. Though public opinion mandated such low pay, dissatisfied Japanese Americans objected to losing their right to make a decent living. They had to use their sparse income for necessities, such as warm clothing and shoes.

Work and jobs (450)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Amache Silk Screen Shop

449 items
Japanese Americans gardening (ddr-densho-151-65)
img Japanese Americans gardening (ddr-densho-151-65)
Original WRA caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry are growing flourishing truck crops for their own use in their "hobby gardens". These crops are grown in plots 10 x 50 feet between blocks of barrack at this War Relocation Authority center.
Farm crew (ddr-densho-151-389)
img Farm crew (ddr-densho-151-389)
Original caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Farm crew of which Johnny Fukazawa is foreman. These men are ready to return to the center's mess hall for lunch after a busy morning in the fields of the farm project at this War Relocation Authority center.
Japanese Americans experimenting with guayule (ddr-densho-151-387)
img Japanese Americans experimenting with guayule (ddr-densho-151-387)
Original caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Chemists, nurserymen, and plant propagators at this War Relocation Authority center assemble to witness a new experiment in an attempt to resolve the amount of rubber produced in a small quantity of the guayule plant. Frank Hirosawa, research rubber chemist, is seated in the foreground.
Japanese Americans tending crops (ddr-densho-151-36)
img Japanese Americans tending crops (ddr-densho-151-36)
Original WRA caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Evacuee in her "hobby garden" which rates highest of all the garden plots at this War Relocation Authority center. Vegetables for their own use are grown in plots 10 x 50 feet between rows of barracks.
Japanese American workers resting in shade (ddr-densho-151-343)
img Japanese American workers resting in shade (ddr-densho-151-343)
Original caption: San Bruno, California. Time out for some of the boys on the Work Corps. All maintenance work, repair and construction is done by volunteer evacuee workers. The wages are $8.00 per month for 48 hours a week. This gang of boys and young men are digging a drainage tank along one of the ...
Dillon Myer visiting silk screen shop (ddr-densho-159-119)
img Dillon Myer visiting silk screen shop (ddr-densho-159-119)
Dillon Myer is pictured fourth from left. Second from right is James Lindley, Amache concentration camp project director.
Harry Ueno Interview Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1002-7-11)
vh Harry Ueno Interview Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1002-7-11)
Working in camp: clearing sagebrush, then applying to work in mess hall

This interview was conducted by sisters Emiko and Chizuko Omori for their 1999 documentary, Rabbit in the Moon, about the Japanese American resisters of conscience in the World War II incarceration camps. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life ...

Harry Ueno Interview Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1002-7-13)
vh Harry Ueno Interview Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1002-7-13)
Working in the camp mess hall: making do when certain foods are in short supply

This interview was conducted by sisters Emiko and Chizuko Omori for their 1999 documentary, Rabbit in the Moon, about the Japanese American resisters of conscience in the World War II incarceration camps. As a result, the interviews in this collection are ...

Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 45 (ddr-densho-1000-153-45)
vh Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 45 (ddr-densho-1000-153-45)
Moving to permanent camp in Jerome, Arkansas; working as the storekeeper for the food warehouse

Although Mr. Matsumoto does not identify himself as a Kibei (American-born person of Japanese ancestry sent to Japan for formal education and socialization when young and later returned to the U.S.), some of his life experiences are similar to those ...

Tosh Yasutake Interview Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-138-7)
vh Tosh Yasutake Interview Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-138-7)
Gaining valuable experience working as a male attendant in the camp hospital

William Toshio Yasutake was interviewed together with his sister Mitsuye (Yasutake) Yamada and surviving brother, Joseph Yasutake, in group sessions on October 8-9, 2002. He was interviewed individually on November 14, 2002.

Before being contacted by Densho, the Yasutake siblings had planned to conduct ...

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