Education

Schools were quickly organized in the concentration camps, but they suffered from crude facilities and lack of teaching materials. Instruction was given for nursery through high school, and adult education was offered. Trained teachers were in short supply, however, and uncertified Japanese Americans with college degrees often filled in. The War Relocation Authority (WRA) deliberately emphasized Americanization in the education program. Some found it painfully ironic to watch incarcerated youth recite the Pledge of Allegiance.

World War II (20)
Concentration camps (120)
Education (616)

616 items
Grace F. Oshita Interview Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1013-4-12)
vh Grace F. Oshita Interview Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1013-4-12)
Education in camp, working as an assistant to the elementary school principal
Flag ceremony (ddr-densho-113-14)
img Flag ceremony (ddr-densho-113-14)
These children are watching a flag ceremony near the elementary school in Minidoka concentration camp.
Robert Coombs Interview Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-146-16)
vh Robert Coombs Interview Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-146-16)
Participating in a new style of education, teaching core classes at Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho
Stafford Press, June 1943 (ddr-densho-156-428)
doc Stafford Press, June 1943 (ddr-densho-156-428)
Publication of the Sixth Grade, Stafford School, Minidoka concentration camp.
Stafford Press, February 1944 (ddr-densho-156-430)
doc Stafford Press, February 1944 (ddr-densho-156-430)
Publication of the Sixth Grade, Stafford School, Minidoka concentration camp.
Stafford Press, March 1943 (ddr-densho-156-425)
doc Stafford Press, March 1943 (ddr-densho-156-425)
Publication of the Sixth Grade, Stafford School, Minidoka concentration camp.
High school band (ddr-densho-159-182)
img High school band (ddr-densho-159-182)
The Amache High School band conductor was Charles Hinman.
API