Military Intelligence Service

The first Japanese Americans to serve in the military during World War II were linguists involved in the Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS). The MISLS was charged with training soldiers in the Japanese language for intelligence purposes. Japanese Americans served as both instructors and students at the school, which opened on November 1, 1941. The Language School began recruiting instructors and later students directly from concentration camps as early as July 1942. MISLS graduates were assigned in small teams to units fighting in the Pacific and to intelligence centers throughout the Allied command. They translated captured documents, interrogated prisoners of war, wrote propaganda, encouraged Japanese soldiers and civilians to surrender, and monitored radio broadcasts. After the war, they acted as interpreters at the war crime trials and for the occupation government in Japan.

World War II (231)
Military service (2806)
Military Intelligence Service (1145)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
John Aiso, Fort Snelling, Masaji Marumoto, Jack Matsuoka, Military Intelligence Service, Military Intelligence Service Language School, Walter Tsukamoto, Karl Yoneda

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1145 items
Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 52 (ddr-densho-1000-153-52)
vh Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 52 (ddr-densho-1000-153-52)
Description of relationship between Kibei and Nisei at Camp Savage, Minnesota; thoughts on the level of Japanese language education at the language school

Although Mr. Matsumoto does not identify himself as a Kibei (American-born person of Japanese ancestry sent to Japan for formal education and socialization when young and later returned to the U.S.), some of …

Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 54 (ddr-densho-1000-153-54)
vh Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 54 (ddr-densho-1000-153-54)
Assigned to tutor junior officers in Japanese language while at Camp Shelby, Mississippi

Although Mr. Matsumoto does not identify himself as a Kibei (American-born person of Japanese ancestry sent to Japan for formal education and socialization when young and later returned to the U.S.), some of his life experiences are similar to those who do identify …

Harvey Watanabe Interview Segment 23 (ddr-densho-1000-102-23)
vh Harvey Watanabe Interview Segment 23 (ddr-densho-1000-102-23)
Serving in Japan during the postwar occupation, managing a hotel in Tokyo
Harvey Watanabe Interview Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1000-102-19)
vh Harvey Watanabe Interview Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1000-102-19)
Reviewing top secret documents for the U.S. while being tailed by the U.S. Counterintelligence Corps at the same time
Harvey Watanabe Interview Segment 18 (ddr-densho-1000-102-18)
vh Harvey Watanabe Interview Segment 18 (ddr-densho-1000-102-18)
Serving in the Military Intelligence Service in MacArthur's headquarters
Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 48 (ddr-densho-1000-153-48)
vh Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 48 (ddr-densho-1000-153-48)
Seizing an opportunity to leave camp by volunteering for the army

Although Mr. Matsumoto does not identify himself as a Kibei (American-born person of Japanese ancestry sent to Japan for formal education and socialization when young and later returned to the U.S.), some of his life experiences are similar to those who do identify themselves as …

Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 51 (ddr-densho-1000-153-51)
vh Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 51 (ddr-densho-1000-153-51)
Being inducted into the Military Intelligence Service

Although Mr. Matsumoto does not identify himself as a Kibei (American-born person of Japanese ancestry sent to Japan for formal education and socialization when young and later returned to the U.S.), some of his life experiences are similar to those who do identify themselves as such.

Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 49 (ddr-densho-1000-153-49)
vh Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 49 (ddr-densho-1000-153-49)
Being warned not to volunteer for the military's "spy school," but deciding to go anyway

Although Mr. Matsumoto does not identify himself as a Kibei (American-born person of Japanese ancestry sent to Japan for formal education and socialization when young and later returned to the U.S.), some of his life experiences are similar to those who …

Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 83 (ddr-densho-1000-153-83)
vh Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 83 (ddr-densho-1000-153-83)
Taking a side trip to Hiroshima while stationed in Japan

Although Mr. Matsumoto does not identify himself as a Kibei (American-born person of Japanese ancestry sent to Japan for formal education and socialization when young and later returned to the U.S.), some of his life experiences are similar to those who do identify themselves as such.

Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 53 (ddr-densho-1000-153-53)
vh Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 53 (ddr-densho-1000-153-53)
Dynamic between Kibei and Nisei at the MIS language school

Although Mr. Matsumoto does not identify himself as a Kibei (American-born person of Japanese ancestry sent to Japan for formal education and socialization when young and later returned to the U.S.), some of his life experiences are similar to those who do identify themselves as such.

Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 84 (ddr-densho-1000-153-84)
vh Roy H. Matsumoto Interview Segment 84 (ddr-densho-1000-153-84)
Reactions to visiting Hiroshima after the atomic bombing

Although Mr. Matsumoto does not identify himself as a Kibei (American-born person of Japanese ancestry sent to Japan for formal education and socialization when young and later returned to the U.S.), some of his life experiences are similar to those who do identify themselves as such.

Hiro Nishimura Interview Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-237-17)
vh Hiro Nishimura Interview Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-237-17)
The competitive nature of training for the Military Intelligence Service
George Yamada Segment 24 (ddr-densho-1000-187-24)
vh George Yamada Segment 24 (ddr-densho-1000-187-24)
Memories of the Military Intelligence Service

This interview was conducted as part of a project to capture stories of the Japanese American community of Spokane, Washington. Densho worked in collaboration with the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture.

George Yamada Segment 23 (ddr-densho-1000-187-23)
vh George Yamada Segment 23 (ddr-densho-1000-187-23)
Serving stateside with the Military Intelligence Service

This interview was conducted as part of a project to capture stories of the Japanese American community of Spokane, Washington. Densho worked in collaboration with the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture.

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