Military Intelligence Service

The first Japanese Americans to serve in the military during World War II were linguists involved in the Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS). The MISLS was charged with training soldiers in the Japanese language for intelligence purposes. Japanese Americans served as both instructors and students at the school, which opened on November 1, 1941. The Language School began recruiting instructors and later students directly from concentration camps as early as July 1942. MISLS graduates were assigned in small teams to units fighting in the Pacific and to intelligence centers throughout the Allied command. They translated captured documents, interrogated prisoners of war, wrote propaganda, encouraged Japanese soldiers and civilians to surrender, and monitored radio broadcasts. After the war, they acted as interpreters at the war crime trials and for the occupation government in Japan.

World War II (66)
Military service (842)
Military Intelligence Service (635)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
John Aiso, Fort Snelling, Masaji Marumoto, Jack Matsuoka, Military Intelligence Service, Military Intelligence Service Language School, Walter Tsukamoto, Karl Yoneda

635 items
William Marutani Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1000-44-2)
vh William Marutani Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1000-44-2)
Serving in the U.S. occupation forces in Japan, confronting racism while in uniform

This interview was conducted at the Voices of Japanese American Redress Conference, held on the UCLA campus and sponsored by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center and the UCLA School of Public Policy and Social Research. Because of the full conference schedule, our …

Kiwamu
vh Kiwamu "Kiyo" Tsuchida Interview Segment 20 (ddr-densho-1000-405-20)
Serving with the MIS in the Philippines

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

Rick Sato Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-80-13)
vh Rick Sato Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-80-13)
Completing basic training and then being recruited for the Military Intelligence Service
Spady Koyama Interview I Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-38-26)
vh Spady Koyama Interview I Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-38-26)
Military Intelligence Service duty in the Pacific, encountering Japanese soldiers
Tsuguo
vh Tsuguo "Ike" Ikeda Interview I Segment 22 (ddr-densho-1000-123-22)
Drafted into U.S. Army, enduring basic training and attending the Military Intelligence Service Language School at Fort Snelling, Minnesota

As a teenager prior to World War II, began keeping scrapbooks with newspaper articles and memorabilia, a lifetime habit.

Spady Koyama Interview I Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1000-38-19)
vh Spady Koyama Interview I Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1000-38-19)
Experiencing a different racial climate, being Nisei in the segregated South
Paul Bannai Interview I Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-128-26)
vh Paul Bannai Interview I Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-128-26)
Attending Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS), Camp Savage, Minnesota, studying hard to catch up on Japanese language skills
Francis Mas Fukuhara Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-9-16)
vh Francis Mas Fukuhara Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-9-16)
Witnessing racial segregation: "that was kind of an eye-opener for me"
Francis Mas Fukuhara Segment 18 (ddr-densho-1000-9-18)
vh Francis Mas Fukuhara Segment 18 (ddr-densho-1000-9-18)
Military Intelligence Service recruitment, training, and duties
Francis Mas Fukuhara Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-9-17)
vh Francis Mas Fukuhara Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-9-17)
Recruitment, training, and the role of the Kibei in the Military Intelligence Service
API