Receiving redress checks and apology

In 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed into law the Civil Liberties Act, which, among other things, mandated an official apology from the government and monetary payments to Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II. On October 9, 1990, more than two years after the passage of the bill, the first of the redress payments were made in a formal ceremony to elderly issei survivors in Washington, D.C. Similar ceremonies were held in cities across the country. While few of those who were incarcerated feel that the government's apology erases what was done, many believe that a formal admission of wrongdoing helped resolve feelings of shame and corrected misperceptions held by the larger society.

Redress and reparations (813)
Receiving redress checks and apology (96)

96 items
Johnny and Yo Niizawa interview (ddr-csujad-6-25)
doc Johnny and Yo Niizawa interview (ddr-csujad-6-25)
Oral history interview with Johnny and Yo Niizawa. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_NIIZAWA_JOHNNY_AND_YO
James Kirihara interview (ddr-csujad-6-12)
doc James Kirihara interview (ddr-csujad-6-12)
Oral history interview with James Kirihara. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_KIRIHARA_JAMES
Takashi Tsutsui interview (ddr-csujad-6-35)
doc Takashi Tsutsui interview (ddr-csujad-6-35)
Oral history interview with Takashi Tsutsui. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_TSUTSUI_TAKASHI
Sherman Kishi interview (ddr-csujad-6-13)
doc Sherman Kishi interview (ddr-csujad-6-13)
Oral history interview with Sherman Kishi. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_KISHI_SHERMAN
Eric Andow interview (ddr-csujad-6-2)
doc Eric Andow interview (ddr-csujad-6-2)
Oral history interview with Eric Andow. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_ANDOW_ERIC
Robert Yano interview (ddr-csujad-6-36)
doc Robert Yano interview (ddr-csujad-6-36)
Oral history interview with Robert Yano. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_YANO_ROBERT
Oral history of Morris and Cherry Abe (ddr-csujad-28-3)
av Oral history of Morris and Cherry Abe (ddr-csujad-28-3)
Oral history Interview of Morris and Cherry Abe. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: csuci_vcc-jic_0005
Oral history of Marilyn Fordney (ddr-csujad-28-1)
av Oral history of Marilyn Fordney (ddr-csujad-28-1)
Oral history interview of Marilyn Fordney. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: csuci_vcc-jic_0001
Satoshi Kuwamoto interview (ddr-csujad-6-17)
doc Satoshi Kuwamoto interview (ddr-csujad-6-17)
Oral history interview with Satoshi Kuwamoto. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_KUWAMOTO_SATOSHI
Gene Hamaguchi interview (ddr-csujad-6-3)
doc Gene Hamaguchi interview (ddr-csujad-6-3)
Oral history interview with Gene Hamaguchi See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_HAMAGUCHI_GENE
Anne Moore interview (ddr-csujad-6-23)
doc Anne Moore interview (ddr-csujad-6-23)
Oral history interview with Anne Moore. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_MOORE_ANNE
Letter from Michi Weglyn to Frank Chin, September 26, 1991 (ddr-csujad-24-104)
doc Letter from Michi Weglyn to Frank Chin, September 26, 1991 (ddr-csujad-24-104)
A letter from Michi Weglyn to Frank Chin about a woman named Kiyoko Mozaki who was teaching a class on Japanese Americans at a university in Koyoto, Japan. Weglyn states that Mozaki's father was incarcerated in the Tule Lake incarceration camp and later received a redress check. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese …
Letter from Michi Weglyn to Frank Chin, October 24, 1990 (ddr-csujad-24-111)
doc Letter from Michi Weglyn to Frank Chin, October 24, 1990 (ddr-csujad-24-111)
A letter from Michi Weglyn to Frank Chin in which she criticizes the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), and particularly M.M. [Mike Mosaoka], for arguing that siblings of former Japanese American incarcerees should not be able to receive redress checks. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: chi_08_013
White House, Washington (ddr-csujad-24-87)
doc White House, Washington (ddr-csujad-24-87)
A letter from George Bush, President of the United States, apologizing for Japanese American incarceration during World War II. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: chi_07_004
Letter from Cedrick M. Shimo to Bob Bratt, executive director, Office of Reparations Administration, Department of Justice, December 5, 1998 (ddr-csujad-24-68)
doc Letter from Cedrick M. Shimo to Bob Bratt, executive director, Office of Reparations Administration, Department of Justice, December 5, 1998 (ddr-csujad-24-68)
A letter from Cedrick M. Shimo to Bob Bratt in which Shimo makes an argument for why he should receive repatriations, even though he was not in an incarceration camp. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: chi_05_002
Redress check ceremony (ddr-densho-25-121)
img Redress check ceremony (ddr-densho-25-121)
Left to right: Kaz Kayahara with Mr. Eto and son.
Issei receiving her redress check (ddr-densho-25-131)
img Issei receiving her redress check (ddr-densho-25-131)
Assistant Attorney General John Dunne presenting a redress check to Kisa Iseri of Ontario, Oregon.
Written apology (ddr-densho-25-125)
doc Written apology (ddr-densho-25-125)
This written apology from former U.S. President George Bush accompanied redress checks for former camp inmates.
Redress check ceremony (ddr-densho-25-122)
img Redress check ceremony (ddr-densho-25-122)
Left to right: George Pfeiffer, unidentified, and Mae Yamada.
Autographed photo of redress check presentation (ddr-densho-25-132)
img Autographed photo of redress check presentation (ddr-densho-25-132)
Kisa Iseri, an Issei woman, receiving her redress check from Assistant Attorney General John Dunne.
Issei waiting to receive their redress checks (ddr-densho-26-15)
img Issei waiting to receive their redress checks (ddr-densho-26-15)
This ceremony at the Nisei Veterans Hall honored five Issei, all at least 100 years old, and presented them with their redress checks. Shown here are Mr. Katsuho (left) and Mrs. Wakamatsu.
Issei woman waiting for her redress check (ddr-densho-26-39)
img Issei woman waiting for her redress check (ddr-densho-26-39)
This ceremony at the Nisei Veterans Hall honored five Issei, all at least 100 years old, and presented them with their redress checks. Shown here are Norio Wakamatsu and his mother, Mrs. Wakamatsu.
Issei man receiving his redress check (ddr-densho-26-17)
img Issei man receiving his redress check (ddr-densho-26-17)
U.S. Assistant Deputy Attorney General James Turner presenting a redress check to Mr. Frank Yatsu, 105 years old. The check-presentation ceremony, honoring five Issei who were 100 years old or more, took place at the Nisei Veterans Hall in Seattle, Washington.
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