Religion

Japanese Americans used religion as one way to handle the stress of the incarceration experience. Church served as both a spiritual comfort and a place for community gatherings. On Sundays, Buddhist and Christian services and Sunday schools were held in the recreation halls. State Shintoism was another popular religion within the Japanese American community but was banned by the U.S. government on the grounds that it included "Emperor worship." Church services initially were given in both Japanese and English, but camp authorities later banned the use of Japanese at all group gatherings (although translation into Japanese was later permitted at some religious services).

World War II (66)
Concentration camps (618)
Religion (214)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Paul M. Nagano

214 items
Group photograph inside a camp building (ddr-fom-1-109)
img Group photograph inside a camp building (ddr-fom-1-109)
This group was involved in church activities at Minidoka.
The Kinoshita Family meeting visitors at the Minidoka main gate (ddr-fom-1-430)
img The Kinoshita Family meeting visitors at the Minidoka main gate (ddr-fom-1-430)
Left to right: Unknown, Chuck Kinoshita, Fred Suyekichi Kinoshita, Mary Kinoshita, Akino Kinoshita, unknown, Father Leopold Tibesar.
Group photograph in front of barracks (ddr-fom-1-79)
img Group photograph in front of barracks (ddr-fom-1-79)
This group was involved in church activities at Minidoka.
Four women posing for a photograph (ddr-fom-1-74)
img Four women posing for a photograph (ddr-fom-1-74)
These women were involved in church activities at Minidoka.
Follow up memo regarding church ministers receiving salaries (ddr-densho-356-916)
doc Follow up memo regarding church ministers receiving salaries (ddr-densho-356-916)
Memo to James Lindley from John Provinse following up to update the list of ministers at Amache receiving a salary from his church.
Memo regarding ending public assistance grants to ministers (ddr-densho-356-918)
doc Memo regarding ending public assistance grants to ministers (ddr-densho-356-918)
Memo from John J. O. Moore to caseworkers to inform them of the reason to end public assistance grants to ministers, and scrutinize visit requests and grants for unemployment due to enrollment in Japanese Language School.
Memo regarding church ministers receiving salaries (ddr-densho-356-911)
doc Memo regarding church ministers receiving salaries (ddr-densho-356-911)
Memo from John H. Provinse regarding Christian Ministers receiving salaries from their national organizations. Included is a list of ministers at Amache who are receiving a salary and how much that salary is per month.
Memo regarding future public assistance grants to ministers (ddr-densho-356-917)
doc Memo regarding future public assistance grants to ministers (ddr-densho-356-917)
Memo to John J. O. Moore from W. Ray Johnson regarding the compensation ministers are receiving from the outside and from supporters. Recommends not providing further public assistance.
Easter Service Program (ddr-densho-356-815)
doc Easter Service Program (ddr-densho-356-815)
Program for Easter Service at the Granada Christian Church on April 25, 1943.
Rev. L. H. Tibesar posing with the Kinoshita family at gates of Camp Minidoka, Idaho (ddr-densho-403-8)
img Rev. L. H. Tibesar posing with the Kinoshita family at gates of Camp Minidoka, Idaho (ddr-densho-403-8)
Rev. L. H. Tibesar, Maryknoll and pastor of Our Lady Queen of Martyrs, Seattle posed at Minidoka Concentration Camp near Hunt, Idaho. (L to R) Y. M. McLaughlin, Charles Kinoshita, Fred Kinoshita, Mary Kinoshita, Akino Kinoshita, Jean Alexander, Rev. L. H. Tibesar. This content is copyright restricted. Densho and its partners have received permission from the …
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-40)
Slightly yellowed envelope addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama in Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama, at Minidoka. Postmarked October 19, 1942. Along the top 10-23-1942 is written in red pencil. On the left side of the envelope is a purple "Censored" stamp. Inside the envelope is a letter dated October 17, 1942. Teru writes about …
Envelope and letters to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letters to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-20)
White air mail envelope with a red, white and blue border. The envelope is addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama. The envelope is postmarked Jul 21, 1942, and in red pencil below the postmark is the date 7/25/42. On the left side of the envelope is a purple "Censored" …
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