Mass removal ("evacuation")

On March 2, 1942, Public Proclamation No. 1 began to appear on telephone poles and buildings. This was the first official notice Japanese Americans had of their immediate removal from the West Coast. The notices stated that they had six or seven days to prepare, and were to take only what they could carry. They were not told where they would be taken. People rushed to sell or store, in one week, property and belongings acquired over a lifetime. Some families tucked their valuables away in their attic or basement and locked the door, hoping to return soon. On the appointed "evacuation" day, thousands of Japanese Americans gathered at designated locations, with the numbered identification tags they had been issued tied to their coats. Watched by curious onlookers, they were met by armed soldiers and transported in buses, private cars, and trains to sixteen temporary "assembly centers" in California, Washington, Oregon and Arizona.

World War II (218)
Mass removal ("evacuation") (623)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Final Report, Japanese Evacuation from the West Coast, 1942 (book)

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623 items
An Oral History with Katsuma Mukaeda - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-56-1)
vh An Oral History with Katsuma Mukaeda - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-56-1)
Chairman of Japanese American Cultural Center and former president of Japanese Chamber of Commerce recounts conditions of prewar Los Angeles's Little Tokyo, its wartime conversion into a black community, postwar reestablishment as a Japanese-American cultural and commercial center. Includes comments on discriminatory legislation, prewar Japan-American relations. World War II removal and incarceration, camp conditions, wartime repatriation …
An Oral History with Norman Y. Mineta - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-55-1)
vh An Oral History with Norman Y. Mineta - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-55-1)
Japanese American congressman, representing the Thirteenth Congressional District of California, born and raised in San Jose, California, discusses his early life, graduation from the University of California, Berkeley, and receiving a commission and serving in the armed forces from 1953-1956. Recalls the removal, "relocation," and incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II at the Heart …
An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part I - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-59-1)
vh An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part I - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-59-1)
An oral history with Sumiye Takeno, a current resident of Denver, Colorado. This interview was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. The purpose of this interview was to gather information regarding Takeno's incarceration and resettlement experience during World War II. Specifically, the interview covers her childhood in Florin, California, …
Letter to Guyo and Larry Tajiri (ddr-densho-338-165)
doc Letter to Guyo and Larry Tajiri (ddr-densho-338-165)
A letter discussing the forced removal, the Tajiri's effort to keep the Pacific Citizen running in Salt Lake City, and the state of the country.
Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-4)
doc Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-4)
Correspondence from Kinuta Uno's daughter discussing, school, paperwork and the imminent mass removal of the Japanese American community from Washington.
Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-5)
doc Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-5)
Correspondence from Kinuta Uno's daughter discussing mass removal and the need to sell their car. Also included, a document for the lost title and registration cards.
Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-6)
doc Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-6)
Correspondence from Kinuta Uno's daughter discussing daily life, mass removal to Puyallup "Camp Harmony" Assembly Center asking about life at Fort Missoula, and requesting more letters from him.
Letter sent to Kayuko Uno at Pinedale Assembly Center (ddr-densho-324-70)
doc Letter sent to Kayuko Uno at Pinedale Assembly Center (ddr-densho-324-70)
Correspondence from Carl Prato regarding management of the Uno's farm while they were incarcerated.
Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-8)
doc Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-8)
Correspondence from Kinuta Uno's daughter discussing plans for their removal and how they had to quit school after being banned from going into the city limits.
Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-7)
doc Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-7)
Correspondence from Kinuta Uno's daughter requesting power of attorney to sell their belongings before being removed.
Letter sent to Kinuta Uno at Tule Lake concentration camp (ddr-densho-324-71)
doc Letter sent to Kinuta Uno at Tule Lake concentration camp (ddr-densho-324-71)
Correspondence from Carl Prato regarding sale of the Uno's farm and equipment.
The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 30 (April 22, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-16)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 30 (April 22, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-16)
"NVC to Show 442nd Film" (p. 1), "U.S. Navy Now Admits Nisei" (p. 1), "Three Judges Hear Case of Mrs. Bouiss" (p. 1), "Two Wholesale Evacuations: American and Canadian" (p. 2).
Gidra, Vol. I, No. 6 (September 1969) (ddr-densho-297-6)
doc Gidra, Vol. I, No. 6 (September 1969) (ddr-densho-297-6)
Selected article titles: "Isaac Honored" (p. 1), "Birth of Amerasia" (p. 1), "Hoover's Yellow Peril" (p. 2), "Dawn of Awakening" (p. 2), "UCLA Sells Out" (p. 5), "Potential for What" (p. 5), "The Failure of Democracy in a Time of Crisis" (p. 6-7).
A Tule Lake Interlude (ddr-densho-291-1)
doc A Tule Lake Interlude (ddr-densho-291-1)
This collection of poems and stories related to life in Tule Lake was published on concentration camp's first anniversary.
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