Timber

Japanese immigrants (Issei) replaced Chinese workers after the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act went into effect. Laborers were recruited by contracting companies to cut timber and work in sawmills. In rare instances, Issei women joined their husbands, living among the other workers in segregated shantytowns.

Industry and employment (392)
Timber (80)

80 items
A group in front of a house (ddr-densho-353-33)
img A group in front of a house (ddr-densho-353-33)
Shoichiro Katsuno at Pontiac (now the Windermere/Sand Point area) Written on back: "House built by Mr. Katsuno c.1913. Paid only for glass, nails, stovepipe, all the wood was free for clearing the land, knew how to make cedar shakes from work in sawmill earlier."
Sawmill workers (ddr-densho-353-23)
img Sawmill workers (ddr-densho-353-23)
Mukilteo sawmill. Caption in album: "Workers in front of bunkhouses."
Two men cutting down a tree (ddr-densho-353-153)
img Two men cutting down a tree (ddr-densho-353-153)
Note on the back: "Cutting timber with a long saw." Near the Columbia River.
Group of men, women, and children (ddr-densho-353-21)
img Group of men, women, and children (ddr-densho-353-21)
Sawmill workers in Port Blakely. Caption in album: "The sawmill drew many workers."
Men and women in front of sawmill (ddr-densho-353-22)
img Men and women in front of sawmill (ddr-densho-353-22)
Mukilteo sawmill. Caption in album: "Japanese sawmill workers greet a new bride."
API