Kibei

Kibei is the term for the generation of Nisei born in the U.S. but sent to Japan for education. When in Japan, the Kibei lived with grandparents or other relatives while their parents remained in the U.S. to work. Kibei often struggled to fit in both in Japan, where they were viewed as outsiders, and the U.S., where they were considered "too Japanese" by their Nisei peers. Because of their knowledge of both cultures and languages, the Kibei in particular were targeted by the government as "disloyal" during World War II. Ironically, the Kibei were heavily recruited for the Military Intelligence Service because of their linguistic abilities.

Identity and values (110)
Kibei (253)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Harry Ueno

253 items
Minoru Kiyota Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-36-3)
vh Minoru Kiyota Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-36-3)
Resisting the Japanese way of teaching,"...regimentation, constant examination"

This interview was conducted at the 1998 Tule Lake Pilgrimage held at Klamath Falls, Oregon and at the site of Tule Lake incarceration camp in California. Given the limited time available during this event, the length and breadth of this interview are shorter than other Densho interviews.

Minoru Kiyota Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1000-36-1)
vh Minoru Kiyota Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1000-36-1)
Family background and mother's decision to send son to Japan

This interview was conducted at the 1998 Tule Lake Pilgrimage held at Klamath Falls, Oregon and at the site of Tule Lake incarceration camp in California. Given the limited time available during this event, the length and breadth of this interview are shorter than other Densho ...

Minoru Kiyota Segment 5 (ddr-densho-1000-36-5)
vh Minoru Kiyota Segment 5 (ddr-densho-1000-36-5)
Common misperceptions regarding Kibei political beliefs

This interview was conducted at the 1998 Tule Lake Pilgrimage held at Klamath Falls, Oregon and at the site of Tule Lake incarceration camp in California. Given the limited time available during this event, the length and breadth of this interview are shorter than other Densho interviews.

Minoru Kiyota Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1000-36-4)
vh Minoru Kiyota Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1000-36-4)
Developing respect and admiration for the Japanese while attending school in Japan, description of Japanese values and culture

This interview was conducted at the 1998 Tule Lake Pilgrimage held at Klamath Falls, Oregon and at the site of Tule Lake incarceration camp in California. Given the limited time available during this event, the length and breadth ...

Minoru Kiyota Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1000-36-2)
vh Minoru Kiyota Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1000-36-2)
Being raised with Japanese values and customs in America

This interview was conducted at the 1998 Tule Lake Pilgrimage held at Klamath Falls, Oregon and at the site of Tule Lake incarceration camp in California. Given the limited time available during this event, the length and breadth of this interview are shorter than other Densho interviews.

Minoru Kiyota Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-36-6)
vh Minoru Kiyota Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-36-6)
Lingering lessons from the time spent in Japan

This interview was conducted at the 1998 Tule Lake Pilgrimage held at Klamath Falls, Oregon and at the site of Tule Lake incarceration camp in California. Given the limited time available during this event, the length and breadth of this interview are shorter than other Densho interviews.

Minoru Kiyota Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-36-7)
vh Minoru Kiyota Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-36-7)
Contrasting U.S. and Japanese education

This interview was conducted at the 1998 Tule Lake Pilgrimage held at Klamath Falls, Oregon and at the site of Tule Lake incarceration camp in California. Given the limited time available during this event, the length and breadth of this interview are shorter than other Densho interviews.

Hiroko Nakashima Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-69-17)
vh Hiroko Nakashima Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-69-17)
Treatment in Japan as an American; reactions to Japan's surrender" "[O]ur heart was still in America"
Hiroko Nakashima Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-69-6)
vh Hiroko Nakashima Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-69-6)
Living in Japan: being told about the move, packing belongings
Hiroko Nakashima Segment 14 (ddr-densho-1000-69-14)
vh Hiroko Nakashima Segment 14 (ddr-densho-1000-69-14)
Returning to America following the war, meeting other Kibei on the ship
Asano Terao Interview II Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-109-17)
vh Asano Terao Interview II Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-109-17)
Clashing opinions; disagreeing with the Kibeis' belief that Japan would win the war (Japanese language)

This interview was conducted in Japanese and was translated so as to convey Mrs. Terao's way of speaking as closely as possible. For example, there are instances in which she makes some grammatical errors. These mistakes are conveyed through similar grammatical ...

Ed Tsutakawa Interview Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-196-10)
vh Ed Tsutakawa Interview Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-196-10)
Thoughts on the Kibei

This interview was conducted as part of a project to capture stories of the Japanese American community of Spokane, Washington. Densho worked in collaboration with the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture.

Hiroko Nakashima Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-69-11)
vh Hiroko Nakashima Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-69-11)
Working with other students in a factory in Japan to help the war effort
Hiroko Nakashima Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-69-16)
vh Hiroko Nakashima Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-69-16)
Hardships during the war, food shortages and ground-up grasshoppers
Hiroko Nakashima Segment 8 (ddr-densho-1000-69-8)
vh Hiroko Nakashima Segment 8 (ddr-densho-1000-69-8)
Adapting to life in Japan, fitting in as an "Amerikajin"
Hiroko Nakashima Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-69-12)
vh Hiroko Nakashima Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-69-12)
Graduating from high school, working as an interpreter at the Yanai Railroad Transportation Office during the U.S. occupation
Hiroko Nakashima Segment 25 (ddr-densho-1000-69-25)
vh Hiroko Nakashima Segment 25 (ddr-densho-1000-69-25)
Always planning on returning to the U.S., having to wait out the war
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