Aftermath

The "evacuation" of Japanese Americans from their homes on the West Coast reduced once-thriving communities to ghost towns. Having only a week to prepare for the removal, many Japanese Americans were forced to board up and abandon businesses and homes. Rampant anti-Japanese sentiment in newspapers, theater newsreels, and radio broadcasts fueled acts of vandalism against the vacated neighborhoods.

World War II (216)
Mass removal ("evacuation") (622)
Aftermath (301)

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Culbert Olson

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301 items
An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part II - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-60-1)
vh An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part II - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-60-1)
An oral history with Sumiye Takeno, a current resident of Denver, Colorado. This interview was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. The purpose of this interview was to gather information regarding Takeno's incarceration and resettlement experience during World War II. Specifically, the interview covers her childhood in Florin, California, …
An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part I - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-59-1)
vh An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part I - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-59-1)
An oral history with Sumiye Takeno, a current resident of Denver, Colorado. This interview was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. The purpose of this interview was to gather information regarding Takeno's incarceration and resettlement experience during World War II. Specifically, the interview covers her childhood in Florin, California, …
Bob Santos Interview I Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-339-10)
vh Bob Santos Interview I Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-339-10)
Changes in Seattle's Japantown community during the war: "you had a partial ghost town"
Money, apology won't ease pain of Camp Amache (ddr-csujad-56-319)
doc Money, apology won't ease pain of Camp Amache (ddr-csujad-56-319)
Gaye Lebaron's article titled: Money, apology won't ease pain of Camp Amache. Published in "The press Democrat" on Sunday May 1, 1988. The original image is housed with the Sonoma County Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), and was borrowed for digitization courtesy of the JACL. This image belongs to a group of images related to the …
Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-9)
img Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-9)
The stores on this block of Sixth Avenue South were closed and boarded up when their Japanese American operators were removed.
Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-11)
img Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-11)
This is the window of the Jackson Photo Studio, located at 624 Jackson Street. The studio was closed when the Japanese American operators were incarcerated. Note the "For Rent" sign in the window and the sign with the American flag.
Japantown after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-51)
img Japantown after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-51)
Japanese Americans were given little time to take care of their personal and business affairs once the exclusion orders were posted. Many businesses were either permanently closed or boarded-up for the duration of World War II. Shown here is 602 to 612 Jackson Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi, or Japantown.
Racist graffiti (ddr-densho-36-55)
img Racist graffiti (ddr-densho-36-55)
Front steps of a home belonging to the S. Nagaishi family.
Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-10)
img Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-10)
The Higo Ten-Cent Store, located on Jackson Street. The Murakamis were able to reopen their store after the war because they were able to pay property taxes while interned. Higo Variety Store was run by Aya and Masako Murakami after the war.
Racial epithet (ddr-densho-36-7)
img Racial epithet (ddr-densho-36-7)
This racial epithet was painted on the garage door of a Japanese American. The photo may have been taken during the resettlement period.
Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-52)
img Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-52)
The Maki Grocery was located at 605 Main Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi. The store was owned by Kiyoichi Maki.
Labor replacements working in fields (ddr-densho-151-140)
img Labor replacements working in fields (ddr-densho-151-140)
Original caption: San Lorenzo, California. Evacuation of farmers of Japanese descent resulted in agricultural labor shortage on Pacific Coast acreage, such as the garlic field in Santa Clara County. High School boys were recruited to off-set the shortage. Farmers and other evacuees will be given opportunities to follow their callings at War Relocation Authority centers where …
The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 35 (May 13, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-22)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 35 (May 13, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-22)
"Jackson St. Area Will Have Its Face Cleaned" (p. 1), "Masaoka Raps Bias Against Japanese" (p. 1), "Pictures Depict Life in Camp" (p. 1)
The Northwest Times Vol. 3 No. 32 (April 20, 1949) (ddr-densho-229-199)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 3 No. 32 (April 20, 1949) (ddr-densho-229-199)
"ADC Fund Push Opens with Kickoff Luncheon" (p. 1), "Evacuation Claims Queries, Replies" (p. 2), "ADC to Ask Amendment to HR 199" (p. 2).
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