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Aftermath

The "evacuation" of Japanese Americans from their homes on the West Coast reduced once-thriving communities to ghost towns. Having only a week to prepare for the removal, many Japanese Americans were forced to board up and abandon businesses and homes. Rampant anti-Japanese sentiment in newspapers, theater newsreels, and radio broadcasts fueled acts of vandalism against the vacated neighborhoods.

World War II (54)
Mass removal ("evacuation") (151)
Aftermath (103)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Culbert Olson

103 items
An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part II - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-60-1)
vh An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part II - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-60-1)
An oral history with Sumiye Takeno, a current resident of Denver, Colorado. This interview was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. The purpose of this interview was to gather information regarding Takeno's incarceration and resettlement experience during World War II. Specifically, the interview covers her childhood in Florin, California, ...
An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part I - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-59-1)
vh An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part I - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-59-1)
An oral history with Sumiye Takeno, a current resident of Denver, Colorado. This interview was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. The purpose of this interview was to gather information regarding Takeno's incarceration and resettlement experience during World War II. Specifically, the interview covers her childhood in Florin, California, ...
Bob Santos Interview I Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-339-10)
vh Bob Santos Interview I Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-339-10)
Changes in Seattle's Japantown community during the war: "you had a partial ghost town"
Community analysis report, no. 5, June 1943 (ddr-csujad-19-4)
doc Community analysis report, no. 5, June 1943 (ddr-csujad-19-4)
Titled as: Evacuee resistance to relocation. Presents three "fundamental reasons" for the "relocation program" designed to encourage people to move out of the incarceration centers, then describes the "ideal relocation program," which would see "every one relocated before June 30, 1944." Provides statistics on numbers of people who left centers on indefinite leave in April and ...
Letter from Henry [Katsumi] Fujita to Mr. H. A. Strong, Electrolux Corporation, August 9, 1942 (ddr-csujad-23-13)
doc Letter from Henry [Katsumi] Fujita to Mr. H. A. Strong, Electrolux Corporation, August 9, 1942 (ddr-csujad-23-13)
Letter from Henry K. Fujita to his boss Mr. H. A. Strong of the Electrolux Corporation in San Francisco dated August 9, 1942. Rich in details, the letter describes the physical layout of the Merced Assembly Center, the poor-quality construction of the barracks, the daily schedules, the camp organization and facilities, the hardships and illnesses and ...
An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part I (ddr-csujad-29-59)
vh An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part I (ddr-csujad-29-59)
An oral history with Sumiye Takeno, a current resident of Denver, Colorado. This interview was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. The purpose of this interview was to gather information regarding Takeno's incarceration and resettlement experience during World War II. Specifically, the interview covers her childhood in Florin, California, ...
An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part II (ddr-csujad-29-60)
vh An Oral History with Sumiye Takeno, Part II (ddr-csujad-29-60)
An oral history with Sumiye Takeno, a current resident of Denver, Colorado. This interview was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. The purpose of this interview was to gather information regarding Takeno's incarceration and resettlement experience during World War II. Specifically, the interview covers her childhood in Florin, California, ...
Pacific Citizen, Vol. 81, No. 21 (November 21, 1975) (ddr-pc-47-46)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 81, No. 21 (November 21, 1975) (ddr-pc-47-46)
Selected article titles: "Wendy Bares Own Background" (pp. 1-2), "Sen. Inouye at Lone Mountain: Vigilance Key to Democracy, Equality" (p. 1), "Denver Testimonial to Salute Only Governor Who Welcomed Evacuees" (p. 1), and "From the Frying Pan: The Japanese Way" (p. 2).
Pacific Citizen, Vol. 102, No. 22 (June 6, 1986) (ddr-pc-58-22)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 102, No. 22 (June 6, 1986) (ddr-pc-58-22)
Selected article titles: "Nisei Will Receive College Diploma--44 Years Later" (pp. 1, 8), "Governor Seeking Support for Redress" (p. 1), "Camp Memorial to Be Dedicated" (p. 2), and "Program to Provide Help for Mail-Order, Servicemen's Wives" (pp. 3, 5).
Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-11)
img Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-11)
This is the window of the Jackson Photo Studio, located at 624 Jackson Street. The studio was closed when the Japanese American operators were incarcerated. Note the "For Rent" sign in the window and the sign with the American flag.
Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-9)
img Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-9)
The stores on this block of Sixth Avenue South were closed and boarded up when their Japanese American operators were removed.
Japantown after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-51)
img Japantown after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-51)
Japanese Americans were given little time to take care of their personal and business affairs once the exclusion orders were posted. Many businesses were either permanently closed or boarded-up for the duration of World War II. Shown here is 602 to 612 Jackson Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi, or Japantown.
Racist graffiti (ddr-densho-36-55)
img Racist graffiti (ddr-densho-36-55)
Front steps of a home belonging to the S. Nagaishi family.
Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-10)
img Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-10)
The Higo Ten-Cent Store, located on Jackson Street. The Murakamis were able to reopen their store after the war because they were able to pay property taxes while interned. Higo Variety Store was run by Aya and Masako Murakami after the war.
Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-52)
img Nihonmachi (Japantown) after mass removal (ddr-densho-36-52)
The Maki Grocery was located at 605 Main Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi. The store was owned by Kiyoichi Maki.
Racial epithet (ddr-densho-36-7)
img Racial epithet (ddr-densho-36-7)
This racial epithet was painted on the garage door of a Japanese American. The photo may have been taken during the resettlement period.
Cemetery vandalism (ddr-densho-37-287)
img Cemetery vandalism (ddr-densho-37-287)
Original WRA caption: Vandalism in the Japanese Cemetary.
Cemetery vandalism (ddr-densho-37-286)
img Cemetery vandalism (ddr-densho-37-286)
Original WRA caption: Vandalism in the Japanese Cemetary.
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