Aftermath

The "evacuation" of Japanese Americans from their homes on the West Coast reduced once-thriving communities to ghost towns. Having only a week to prepare for the removal, many Japanese Americans were forced to board up and abandon businesses and homes. Rampant anti-Japanese sentiment in newspapers, theater newsreels, and radio broadcasts fueled acts of vandalism against the vacated neighborhoods.

World War II (231)
Mass removal ("evacuation") (668)
Aftermath (304)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Culbert Olson

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304 items
Cemetery vandalism (ddr-densho-37-287)
img Cemetery vandalism (ddr-densho-37-287)
Original WRA caption: Vandalism in the Japanese Cemetary.
Cemetery vandalism (ddr-densho-37-286)
img Cemetery vandalism (ddr-densho-37-286)
Original WRA caption: Vandalism in the Japanese Cemetary.
American Concentration Camps VOLUME 2 January 1, 1942- February 19, 1942 (ddr-densho-372-2)
doc American Concentration Camps VOLUME 2 January 1, 1942- February 19, 1942 (ddr-densho-372-2)
Volume 2 divides into two sections. Description about this volume reads directly from the book as follows: The first section features archival documents that show chiefly how the decision to relocate the West Coast Japanese evolved from conflicting views both outside and inside the executive branch. The second section features reports of the Anti-Axis Committee, Los …
American Concentration Camps VOLUME 3 February 20, 1942- March 31, 1942 (ddr-densho-372-3)
doc American Concentration Camps VOLUME 3 February 20, 1942- March 31, 1942 (ddr-densho-372-3)
Volume 3 divides into 4 sections. Description about this volume reads directly from the book as follows: Section 1 contains archival documents from February 20, 1942 to March 19, 1942 regarding the basic decision of how to remove more than 100,000 human beings which was delegated to General De Witt and his staff. Section 2 contains …
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