Preparation

On March 2, 1942, Public Proclamation No. 1 began to appear on telephone poles and buildings. This was the first official notice Japanese Americans had of their immediate removal from the West Coast. The notices stated that they had six or seven days to prepare, and were to take only what they could carry. They were not told where they would be taken. People rushed to sell or store, in one week, property and belongings acquired over a lifetime. Some families tucked their valuables away in their attic or basement and locked the door, hoping to return soon.

Preparation (277)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Military Areas 1 and 2

277 items
JACL document: Suggestions of Things to Take (ddr-densho-205-8)
doc JACL document: Suggestions of Things to Take (ddr-densho-205-8)
This document was issued by the Yuba-Sutter-Butte-Colusa Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League. It details suggested items to bring during mass removal.
Japanese Americans registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-151-219)
img Japanese Americans registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-151-219)
Original caption: Lodi, California. Heads of families and persons living alone, of Japanese ancestry, have concluded their arrangements at the Wartime Civil Control Administration Control Station under Civilian Exclusion Order Number 70. Their papers are in order and they are turning them in at a desk before they leave for the Assembly Center.
Japanese American Citizens League stenographer (ddr-densho-151-119)
img Japanese American Citizens League stenographer (ddr-densho-151-119)
Original caption: Centerville, California. Stenographer for Japanese American Citizens League of Mt. Eden township. Helps the farmers of the vicinity to close out their affairs before evacuation.
Japanese Americans waiting in line for inoculations (ddr-densho-151-131)
img Japanese Americans waiting in line for inoculations (ddr-densho-151-131)
Original caption: San Francisco, California. Waiting in line, 2031 Bush Street, for voluntary inoculation against typhoid, preceding evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.
Sign advertising free kittens (ddr-densho-151-62)
img Sign advertising free kittens (ddr-densho-151-62)
Original WRA caption: A home is sought for kittens as owners prepare to evacuate. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.
Japanese American boarding up store (ddr-densho-151-93)
img Japanese American boarding up store (ddr-densho-151-93)
Original caption: San Francisco, California. With the the owner scheduled to be evacuated, a store front is boarded on Post Street, San Francisco, California.
Goods for sale in Japantown (ddr-densho-151-233)
img Goods for sale in Japantown (ddr-densho-151-233)
Original caption: San Francisco, California. A common sight on the streets of the Japanese quarter of the city prior to evacuation.
Issei man registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-151-135)
img Issei man registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-151-135)
Original caption: Hayward, California. A farmer of Japanese ancestry appears at Wartime Civil Control Administration station prepratory to evacuation. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for duration.
Japanese Americans registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-151-99)
img Japanese Americans registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-151-99)
Original caption: San Francisco, California. Residents of Japanese ancestry file forms containing personal data, two days before evacuation, at Wartime Civil Control Administration station. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.
Japanese Americans receiving inoculations (ddr-densho-151-109)
img Japanese Americans receiving inoculations (ddr-densho-151-109)
Original caption: San Francisco, California. As a safeguard for health, evacuees of Japanese descent were inoculated as they registered for evacuation at 2031 Bush Street. Nurses and doctors, also of Japanese ancestry, administered inoculations. Evacuees were later transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.
People shopping at
img People shopping at "evacuation sale" (ddr-densho-151-213)
Original caption: San Francisco, California. At a close-out sale these patrons were buying merchandise to take with them when they are evacuated. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.
Nisei Grill restaurant (ddr-densho-151-52)
img Nisei Grill restaurant (ddr-densho-151-52)
Original WRA caption: San Francisco, California. This restaurant, named "Nisei" after second- generation children born in this country to Japanese immigrants was closed prior to evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry; and, according to sign in the window, was scheduled to re- open under new management. Evacuees will be housed at War Relocation Authority centers for ...
Mid-Columbia Bulletin Vol. VII (ddr-one-3-9)
doc Mid-Columbia Bulletin Vol. VII (ddr-one-3-9)
Mid-Columbia Bulletin newsletter. Vol. VII, April 30, 1942. First page in English, gives information about what the Assembly Centers are like and what items may be brought to the Center. Mentions the sale of rice and a typhoid inoculation clinic. The remaining 5 pages are in Japanese.
Two teen boys (ddr-densho-242-9)
img Two teen boys (ddr-densho-242-9)
Caption by Ike Hatchimonji: "Ike and Mike on day of departure to a camp May 1942."
Registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-34-164)
img Registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-34-164)
Surrounded by U.S. army soldiers, Nisei men register their families during the exclusion from Bainbridge Island, Washington.
Ted Nagata Interview Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1013-3-4)
vh Ted Nagata Interview Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1013-3-4)
Preparing for mass removal: "There was a huge amount of personal property loss"
George Nakata Interview Segment 11 (ddr-one-7-29-11)
vh George Nakata Interview Segment 11 (ddr-one-7-29-11)
Preparing for mass removal

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

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