Returning home

When the camps closed, Japanese Americans were handed $25 and put on trains headed for the places they had been forcibly removed from nearly four years earlier. Harassment was common -- many returning Japanese Americans were greeted with signs reading "No Japs Allowed." Other discovered their property had been vandalized or stolen. Homes and businesses that had been boarded up or left in the care of others were abandoned and stripped of furnishings and goods. For the majority, who did not have homes to return to, housing was the most serious problem. Housing discrimination was severe in many areas and persisted to varying degrees until the civil rights legislation of the 1960s. Former camp inmates with no other options moved into hostels and converted community institutions with conditions not much better than the camps they had just left. Although this period was stressful, it is remembered as a time when people came together to share what they had.

World War II (215)
Leaving camp (261)
Returning home (1010)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Alien land laws, Hood River incident, Kazuo Masuda, Return to West Coast

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1010 items
Floyd Schmoe Interview II Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1000-86-1)
vh Floyd Schmoe Interview II Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1000-86-1)
Giving aid to Japanese Americans returning to Washington state after the war

In this interview Mr. Schmoe refers to Aki Kurose, a former employee, fellow Quaker, peace activist, and long-time friend. At the time of this interview, Ms. Kurose had recently passed away after a long struggle with cancer. At the time of this interview, Mr. …

Nobu Suzuki Interview II Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-87-17)
vh Nobu Suzuki Interview II Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-87-17)
Husband returns to medical practice, delivers postwar baby boom babies

References are made to several of Nobu Suzuki's personal papers, which are currently available for public perusal at the University of Washington's Manuscripts and University Archives.

Nobu Suzuki Interview II Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-87-16)
vh Nobu Suzuki Interview II Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-87-16)
Influx of servicemen changes neighborhoods and creates housing shortage after the war

References are made to several of Nobu Suzuki's personal papers, which are currently available for public perusal at the University of Washington's Manuscripts and University Archives.

Junkoh Harui Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-11-16)
vh Junkoh Harui Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-11-16)
Efforts to rebuild Bainbridge Gardens: father's hurt at seeing his trees, taken during the war, in neighbors' yards

This interview was done outdoors in the Bainbridge Gardens Nursery which resulted in increased background noise and frequent interruptions by the business P.A. system.

Mitsuko Hashiguchi Segment 62 (ddr-densho-1000-12-62)
vh Mitsuko Hashiguchi Segment 62 (ddr-densho-1000-12-62)
Shock at condition of family farm upon returning after the war
Junkoh Harui Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-11-26)
vh Junkoh Harui Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-11-26)
Lessons learned from rebuilding, the importance of honor, dignity, and family legacy

This interview was done outdoors in the Bainbridge Gardens Nursery which resulted in increased background noise and frequent interruptions by the business P.A. system.

Fumiko Hayashida Segment 32 (ddr-densho-1000-15-32)
vh Fumiko Hayashida Segment 32 (ddr-densho-1000-15-32)
Leaving camp and returning to Bainbridge Island: "glad to be home"
Fumiko Hayashida Segment 33 (ddr-densho-1000-15-33)
vh Fumiko Hayashida Segment 33 (ddr-densho-1000-15-33)
Observing changes in the Bainbridge Island Japanese American community postwar
Frank Kitamoto Segment 25 (ddr-densho-1000-35-25)
vh Frank Kitamoto Segment 25 (ddr-densho-1000-35-25)
Mother's efforts to reestablish the family farm after the war
Akiko Kurose Interview II Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-42-12)
vh Akiko Kurose Interview II Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-42-12)
Opening up family apartment to returning Japanese Americans after the war

Mrs. Kurose was undergoing treatment for cancer and required frequent breaks and medication to help her with pain management.

Kay Matsuoka Segment 40 (ddr-densho-1000-48-40)
vh Kay Matsuoka Segment 40 (ddr-densho-1000-48-40)
Returning to Fresno, California, after the war: struggling with illness and making a living
Paul Nagano Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-65-12)
vh Paul Nagano Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-65-12)
Re-establishing Japanese Christian churches on West Coast during the postwar resettlement period
Mako Nakagawa Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1000-66-19)
vh Mako Nakagawa Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1000-66-19)
Parental discussions and anxiety surrounding where to go after leaving camp
Mako Nakagawa Segment 23 (ddr-densho-1000-66-23)
vh Mako Nakagawa Segment 23 (ddr-densho-1000-66-23)
Issues of racism and identity, learning a meaningful poem in school
Mako Nakagawa Segment 21 (ddr-densho-1000-66-21)
vh Mako Nakagawa Segment 21 (ddr-densho-1000-66-21)
Parents' struggles to reestablish their lives and find work
Richard Murakami Segment 45 (ddr-densho-1000-64-45)
vh Richard Murakami Segment 45 (ddr-densho-1000-64-45)
The depleted condition of the Eagle Oyster Packing Company after the war
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