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Renunciation of citizenship

During World War II, 5,589 American citizens of Japanese descent renounced their U.S. citizenship. The renunciations took place between December 1944 and July 1945, mostly in Tule Lake concentration camp, California. The vast majority of renunciations had little to do with "disloyalty" to the U.S., but instead were the result of a series of complex conditions and events that were beyond the control of those involved. After a legal battle, most renunciants had their U.S. citizenship restored in the 1960s.

World War II (54)
Resistance and dissidence (50)
Renunciation of citizenship (115)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Segregation

115 items
Supplemental affidavit to be submitted with applications of Japanese
doc Supplemental affidavit to be submitted with applications of Japanese "renunciants" (ddr-csujad-24-86)
An affidavit prepared by Jitsushige Tsuha (Reverend Kenjitsu Jitsushige Tsuha) for the Immigration and Naturalization Service requesting that his citizenship and accompanying civil rights be restored. In these documents Tsuha argues that he was forced at gunpoint to sign forms renouncing his citizenship at the Tule Lake incarceration camp and did not realize what he was ...
Letter from Kathleen M. O'Connor, archivist, National Archives-Pacific Sierra Region to Michi Weglyn, June 23, 1997 (ddr-csujad-24-77)
doc Letter from Kathleen M. O'Connor, archivist, National Archives-Pacific Sierra Region to Michi Weglyn, June 23, 1997 (ddr-csujad-24-77)
A letter from Kathleen M. O'Connor at the National Archives in response to Weglyn's request for records about Japanese American citizenship renunciation cases. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: chi_06_003
Letter from Michi Weglyn to Frank Chin, September 26, 1991 (ddr-csujad-24-104)
doc Letter from Michi Weglyn to Frank Chin, September 26, 1991 (ddr-csujad-24-104)
A letter from Michi Weglyn to Frank Chin about a woman named Kiyoko Mozaki who was teaching a class on Japanese Americans at a university in Koyoto, Japan. Weglyn states that Mozaki's father was incarcerated in the Tule Lake incarceration camp and later received a redress check. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese ...
Pacific Citizen, Vol. 43, No. 7 (August 17, 1956) (ddr-pc-28-33)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 43, No. 7 (August 17, 1956) (ddr-pc-28-33)
Selected article titles: "Congressman Cites Masaoka Letter on Restriction of Japan Imports" (p. 1), "Demo platform chairman lauds nisei loyalty" (p. 1), "Army to Curtail Japanese Language at Presidio School" (p. 1), "$187,000 for evacuation claims payment approved for 28 recipients" (p. 1), "Citizenship restoration policy for Tule Lake renunciants established" (p. 2), "College extension course ...
Scrapbook page with one article (ddr-densho-35-400)
doc Scrapbook page with one article (ddr-densho-35-400)
Newspaper clipping from the Oregonian titled "They've Changed Their Minds."
Scrapbook page (ddr-densho-35-402)
doc Scrapbook page (ddr-densho-35-402)
Two photograhs and one article from the Oregonian. Photographs are titled "Japanese Youngsters Among Repatriates Sailing." Newspaper article is titled "Nisei Fight To Remain In America."
Two memos regarding Manzanar concentration camp, California (ddr-densho-67-14)
doc Two memos regarding Manzanar concentration camp, California (ddr-densho-67-14)
The subject of these memos is the identification of suspected pro-Japanese individuals.
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