Agriculture

Many Issei (first-generation Japanese immigrants) began as sharecroppers. Others sought to buy land, but the Issei had to overcome obstacles preventing them from competing with white farmers. California and other states passed alien land laws prohibiting Asian immigrants from purchasing or leasing agricultural land. There were ways around the discriminatory laws: an Issei father could put the property in the name of his American-born child, or issei could form corporations in which a majority of the shareholders were American citizens. Despite the alien land laws, Issei farmers played a significant role in West Coast agriculture. In the years just prior to World War II, Japanese American families grew 35 percent of the produce in California. By the 1920s, Japanese Americans supplied 75 percent of the produce and half the milk to the Puget Sound region.

Agriculture (508)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Seabrook Farms

505 items
Arrivals (ddr-hmwf-1-199)
img Arrivals (ddr-hmwf-1-199)
"Hanako request, June 20 1044, Denson Arkansas arrivals (June 15)" as described on back
Cart (ddr-one-1-632)
img Cart (ddr-one-1-632)
Black and white photographic negative of a cart with dirt covering the wheels.
Welding (ddr-one-1-442)
img Welding (ddr-one-1-442)
Color slide of an unidentified man wearing a welding helmet and holding tools. Appears to be working on repairing a piece of machinery. According to donor processed on June 20, 1951.
Frank on a tractor (ddr-one-1-574)
img Frank on a tractor (ddr-one-1-574)
Black and white photographic negative of Frank Hirahara sitting on an old tractor at a farm.
Kay Kido Threw Her Trousseau Overboard to Become American (ddr-one-3-76)
doc Kay Kido Threw Her Trousseau Overboard to Become American (ddr-one-3-76)
November 5, 1953 issue of the Mt. Adams Sun, Volume XIX, Number 6. The newspaper contains an article on the front page titled "Kay Kido Threw Her Trousseau Overboard to Become American." The article is about the Kenjiro and Miyuki "Kay" Kida process for American citizenship and their experiences living in the United States.
Japanese American farmers prior to mass removal (ddr-densho-151-124)
img Japanese American farmers prior to mass removal (ddr-densho-151-124)
Original caption: San Leandro, California. Family labor transplanting young tomato plants under canvas about ten days prior to evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry to Assembly Centers.
Family on their farm (ddr-densho-153-16)
img Family on their farm (ddr-densho-153-16)
Amy Matsushita and parents Kyoko Amitani Matsushita and Yasutaro Matsushita.
Gidra, Vol. I, No. 3 (June 1969) (ddr-densho-297-3)
doc Gidra, Vol. I, No. 3 (June 1969) (ddr-densho-297-3)
Selected article titlese: "The Persecution Rests" (p. 1), "CS, It's a Gas!" (p. 1), "Reflections in a Slanted Eye" (p. 2), "Grapes Are Coming!" (p. 4).
Japanese farmer planting rice (ddr-densho-299-176)
img Japanese farmer planting rice (ddr-densho-299-176)
Caption: "Rice plants are planted individually by hand in the muddy soil."
Farmers threshing grains during harvest (ddr-densho-299-28)
img Farmers threshing grains during harvest (ddr-densho-299-28)
Caption on reverse: "FEC-47-77285. 14 July 47 / Japanese farmers work together / during harvest time: / Japanese women, men and children / thresh barley and other cereal / grains on a foot-powered threshing / machine at a farm located near / Mount Fuji, Japan. On farms such / as this it is often a community ...
Letter sent to Kayuko Uno at Pinedale Assembly Center (ddr-densho-324-70)
doc Letter sent to Kayuko Uno at Pinedale Assembly Center (ddr-densho-324-70)
Correspondence from Carl Prato regarding management of the Uno's farm while they were incarcerated.
API