Agriculture

Many Issei (first-generation Japanese immigrants) began as sharecroppers. Others sought to buy land, but the Issei had to overcome obstacles preventing them from competing with white farmers. California and other states passed alien land laws prohibiting Asian immigrants from purchasing or leasing agricultural land. There were ways around the discriminatory laws: an Issei father could put the property in the name of his American-born child, or issei could form corporations in which a majority of the shareholders were American citizens. Despite the alien land laws, Issei farmers played a significant role in West Coast agriculture. In the years just prior to World War II, Japanese American families grew 35 percent of the produce in California. By the 1920s, Japanese Americans supplied 75 percent of the produce and half the milk to the Puget Sound region.

Industry and employment (332)
Agriculture (505)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Seabrook Farms

505 items
Mother and son in front of trucks (ddr-densho-60-2)
img Mother and son in front of trucks (ddr-densho-60-2)
Rick Sato's mother and son. On the left is a packing shed.
Brookville Gardens (ddr-densho-109-64)
img Brookville Gardens (ddr-densho-109-64)
Left to right: Mrs. Terayama, Kameo Yamamoto, Haruaki Yotsuuye (driving).
Painting of farmers harvesting watermelons (ddr-manz-2-67)
img Painting of farmers harvesting watermelons (ddr-manz-2-67)
Caption: "The resients [sic] transformed dusty semi-arid land into green truck farms, growing vegetable crops of all kinds. I sketched this scene of workers harvesting large, ripe, sweet watermelons."
Painting of two men working with guayule cuttings (ddr-manz-2-10)
img Painting of two men working with guayule cuttings (ddr-manz-2-10)
Caption: "Rooted cuttings are transplanted to milk cartons and then to the field. Trnsplanting [sic] is done carefully and speedily by hand of the experimenters. Mr. Akaboshi."
Painting of a biologist working with guayule (ddr-manz-2-71)
img Painting of a biologist working with guayule (ddr-manz-2-71)
Caption: "A biologist hybidizes [sic] Guayule trying to produce plants superior in quality then those existing now."
Painting showing guayule harvesting (ddr-manz-2-8)
img Painting showing guayule harvesting (ddr-manz-2-8)
Caption: "The first successful growing of - guayule rubber plant cuttings."
Painting of farmers harvesting okra (ddr-manz-2-69)
img Painting of farmers harvesting okra (ddr-manz-2-69)
Caption: "Farm workers harvest crop of Manzanar grown okra."
Illustrations of guayule leaf types (ddr-manz-2-70)
img Illustrations of guayule leaf types (ddr-manz-2-70)
Caption: "Guayule shrub and leaf types. Some of the leaf types can be used to distinguish one strain from another."
Arrivals (ddr-hmwf-1-199)
img Arrivals (ddr-hmwf-1-199)
"Hanako request, June 20 1044, Denson Arkansas arrivals (June 15)" as described on back
Arrivals (ddr-hmwf-1-200)
img Arrivals (ddr-hmwf-1-200)
"Hanako request, June 20 1044, Denson Arkansas arrivals (June 15)" as described on back
Japanese American farmers prior to mass removal (ddr-densho-151-124)
img Japanese American farmers prior to mass removal (ddr-densho-151-124)
Original caption: San Leandro, California. Family labor transplanting young tomato plants under canvas about ten days prior to evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry to Assembly Centers.
Japanese Americans working in fields (ddr-densho-151-228)
img Japanese Americans working in fields (ddr-densho-151-228)
Original caption: Centerville, California. Japanese field laborers packing cauliflower in field on large-scale ranch owned by white operator (L.E. Bailey).
API