15 Partners

Densho
(381 collections)

Densho documents the testimonies of Japanese Americans who were unjustly incarcerated during World War II before their memories are extinguished. Densho offers these irreplaceable firsthand accounts, coupled with historical images, historical documents, and teacher resources, to explore principles of democracy and promote equal justice for all. [More »]

Alameda Japanese American History Project
(9 collections)

The Alameda Japanese American History Project (AJAH) is a partnership between the Alameda Free Library, Buena Vista United Methodist Church, the Buddhist Temple of Alameda, Densho, the Internet Archive, and Rhythmix Cultural Works. The project partners worked together to research, document, and preserve the history of the Japanese Americans of Alameda who lived through the era of forced removal, incarceration, and post-war return. The collections of photos, documents, and oral histories available here represent the many hours of work and dedication each partner put into the project. [More »]

CSU Japanese American History Digitization Project
(57 collections)

The CSU Japanese American Digitization Project (CSUJAD) began in 2013 with the goal of providing scholars, librarians, archivists, educators and the interested public with far easier access to a wide variety of archival material about Japanese Americans. The project partners include: the 23-campus California State University system archives, and other, similar collections across the state. [More »]

Dennis M. Ogawa Nippu Jiji Photograph Collection
(7 collections)

The Dennis M. Ogawa Nippu Jiji Photograph Collection is made available courtesy of the Hawaii Times Photo Archives Foundation. This long-term collaborative project started with the Foundation rescuing and organizing about 25,000 published and unpublished photographs and supporting documents, once housed at Nippu Jiji and later Hawaii Times. Densho initially partnered with the Hawaii Times Photo Archives Foundation in 2013 to help make these materials available to the public. The project has since been taken over by the Japanese Diaspora Initiative, which aims to make the images and rich English and Japanese descriptive metadata available open access on the Hoji Shinbun Digital Collection, collection by collection over time. [More »]

Friends of Minidoka
(1 collection)

Through the support of a 2018 National Park Service Japanese American Confinement Sites grant and in partnership with Densho, Friends of Minidoka and Densho worked with a researcher to digitize nearly 1,000 images held in the National Archives, most of which were unprinted film negatives from the official WRA records, in which government photographers were hired to document the Minidoka camp during the war. Most of these images did not yet exist in a digital format, and will help future generations of researchers and descendants better understand Minidoka. [More »]

Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation
(1 collection)

Formed in 1996, the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation (HMWF) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. The Foundation works to preserve what remains of the World War II Japanese American confinement site in Park County, Wyoming, and to tell the stories of the more than 14,000 people unjustly incarcerated at the site. In August of 2011, the Foundation opened the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center, a world-class museum dedicated to teaching this story to future generations. [More »]

Seattle Chapter JACL
(2 collections)

The Japanese American Citizens League is a national organization whose mission is to secure and safeguard the civil and human rights of Asian and Pacific Islander Americans and all communities who are affected by injustice and bigotry. The leaders and members of the JACL also work to promote and preserve the heritage and legacy of the Japanese American Community. The Seattle Chapter of the JACL formed around 1930 and has been a fixture of the Japanese American community ever since. [More »]

Japanese American Museum of Oregon
(5 collections)

The Japanese American Museum of Oregon in Portland is charged with preserving and sharing the history and culture of the Nikkei community—Japanese emigrants and their descendants. Formerly known as the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center, JAMO is a venue for culture and research as well as an invaluable resource for exploring Nikkei experiences and their role in Oregon’s multicultural community. [More »]

Japanese American Museum of San Jose
(2 collections)

The Japanese American Museum of San Jose’s (JAMsj) mission is to preserve and disseminate the culture and history of Japanese Americans, with a special focus on the Santa Clara Valley. [More »]

Japanese American National Museum
(6 collections)

As the national repository of Japanese American history, the Japanese American National Museum (JANM) creates groundbreaking historical and arts exhibitions, educational public programs, award-winning documentaries, and innovative curriculum that illuminate the stories and the rich cultural heritage of people of Japanese ancestry in the United States. JANM also speaks out when diversity, individual dignity and social justice are undermined, vigilantly sharing the hard-fought lessons accrued from this history. Its underlying purpose is to transform lives, create a more just America and, ultimately, a better world. [More »]

Japanese American Service Committee (JASC) and Chicago Japanese American Historical Society (CJAHS) Oral History Project Collections
(1 collection)

Founded in 1946, The Japanese American Service Committee (JASC) was formed to serve the needs of Japanese immigrants and their American-born children coming to Chicago after leaving the World War II incarceration camps. Originally called the Chicago Resettlers Committee, the organization assisted with housing, jobs, and the re-forming of a community. JASC also works to archive the history of the Japanese American experience in Chicago for both scholars and the community with the JASC Legacy Center while continuing to provide social service and cultural programs for the greater Chicago area. [More »]

Manzanar National Historic Site
(10 collections)

The Manzanar National Historic Site, administered by the National Park Service, was established to preserve the stories of the internment of nearly 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II and to serve as a reminder to this and future generations of the fragility of American civil liberties. [More »]

The Pacific Citizen
(63 collections)

Since September 1929, the print edition of the Pacific Citizen has been the leading national newspaper for the APA community. Originally called the Nikkei Shimin (Japanese American Citizen), the San Francisco-based newspaper was a lifeline for the Japanese American community. [More »]

Seattle Betsuin Buddhist Temple Archives
(5 collections)

Seattle Buddhist members, recognizing the rich history tied into their Temple, formed the Betsuin Archives Committee in 1977. The intent of the committee is to preserve the Japanese American Buddhists’ heritage for future generations. To date, the SBBT has collected, cataloged, and indexed over 2,000 artifacts and over 3,000 photographs, slides and documents. They have also completed more than 20 oral history interviews. The Betsuin Archivist Committee has partnered with Densho to digitize a small selection of materials related to the history of the Temple and Japanese American community in Seattle. This work was generously funded by 4Culture. [More »]

JACL Philadelphia
(1 collection)

The Japanese American Citizens League is a national organization whose mission is to secure and safeguard the civil and human rights of Asian and Pacific Islander Americans and all communities who are affected by injustice and bigotry. The leaders and members of the JACL also work to promote and preserve the heritage and legacy of the Japanese American Community. The Philadelphia Chapter of the JACL formed in 1947 and remains the main convener of the Japanese American community there. [More »]