Mitsue Matsui Segment 7

Description of siblings (ddr-densho-1008-3-1) - 00:01:40
Family background: medicine and affluence (ddr-densho-1008-3-2) - 00:06:29
Family's attitude towards education: different expectations of sons and daughters (ddr-densho-1008-3-3) - 00:04:34
Finishing at top of class in typing in Japan (ddr-densho-1008-3-4) - 00:03:37
Attending Japanese school in San Francisco, a visit from Prince and Princess Takamatsu (ddr-densho-1008-3-5) - 00:02:22
FBI roundup of Japanese community leaders after the bombing of Pearl Harbor (ddr-densho-1008-3-6) - 00:02:00
Working for the Japanese Chamber of Commerce when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor (ddr-densho-1008-3-7) - 00:04:38
Sent to the Military Intelligence Service Language School at Camp Savage, Minnesota (ddr-densho-1008-3-8) - 00:06:53
Family split between Topaz concentration camp, the Midwest, and Japan (ddr-densho-1008-3-9) - 00:01:35
Father's attitude toward war (ddr-densho-1008-3-10) - 00:02:36
Finally receiving letter from brother still in Japan, finding out he's still alive (ddr-densho-1008-3-11) - 00:05:01
Living conditions in Topaz concentration camp: lacking privacy (ddr-densho-1008-3-12) - 00:04:49
Food in Topaz concentration camp (ddr-densho-1008-3-13) - 00:02:36
Taking a job with the Military Intelligence Service (ddr-densho-1008-3-14) - 00:01:51
Description of John Aiso (ddr-densho-1008-3-15) - 00:06:51
A growing respect and demand for Military Intelligence Service Language School graduates (ddr-densho-1008-3-16) - 00:03:53
Sharing memories of Major Aiso, "A great Nisei leader" (ddr-densho-1008-3-17) - 00:04:41
Reaction to dropping of atomic bomb over Hiroshima (ddr-densho-1008-3-18) - 00:06:06
Reuniting with a barely recognizable brother (ddr-densho-1008-3-19) - 00:04:20
Postwar Japan, changes since the war (ddr-densho-1008-3-20) - 00:04:56
Thoughts on the atomic bombings (ddr-densho-1008-3-21) - 00:01:40
Reflecting on the circumstances of John Aiso's passing (ddr-densho-1008-3-22) - 00:03:16
Resettling in Seattle, Washington (ddr-densho-1008-3-23) - 00:02:27
Reflections (ddr-densho-1008-3-24) - 00:01:53
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ddr-densho-1008-3-7 (Legacy UID: denshovh-mmitsue-01-0007)

Working for the Japanese Chamber of Commerce when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor

Members of the National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS) arranged for and conducted this interview in conjunction with Densho.

00:04:38 — Segment 7 of 24

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December 12, 1997

National Japanese American Historical Society Collection

National Japanese American Historical Society Collection

Courtesy of the National Japanese American Historical Society

ddr-densho-1008-3

Mitsue Matsui

Mitsue Matsui Interview

01:30:44 — 24 segments

December 12, 1997

Seattle, Washington

Nisei female. Born in San Francisco, California. As a young woman, entire family visited Japan for ten months, where she acquired the skill of Japanese typing at the Kumahira Typist Yoseisho in Hiroshima. Returned to the U.S. with most of her family (eldest brother remained in Japan) and was working at the Japanese Chamber of Commerce in San Francisco when the U.S. entered World War II. Was incarcerated with the family at Tanforan Assembly Center, San Bruno, California and Topaz concentration camp, Utah. After spending a year at Topaz, was able to secure employment as a Japanese typist at the Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS), Camp Savage and Fort Snelling, Minnesota. Soon thereafter, was temporarily assigned as secretary to Mr. John F. Aiso and remained in that capacity until Major Aiso received orders to go overseas. Married a MISLS instructor, and went again to Japan postwar during her husband's service in the U.S. occupation forces.

(Members of the National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS) arranged for and conducted this interview in conjunction with Densho.)

Marvin Uratsu, interviewer; Gary Otake, interviewer; Matt Emery, videographer

National Japanese American Historical Society Collection

Courtesy of the National Japanese American Historical Society

API