The DDR will be down for planned maintenance on Wednesday, December 11, 2019 from 12:00PM (noon) PST until 2:00PM PST. Densho websites encyclopedia.densho.org and resourceguide.densho.org will also be unavailable during this time; however, you will still be able to visit our blog and find other information about Densho at our main website, www.densho.org. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. Please email questions or comments to [email protected]

.

Sumiko M. Yamamoto Interview Segment 1

Description of siblings (ddr-densho-1000-269-1) -
Parents' family background (ddr-densho-1000-269-2) -
Moving frequently as a young child (ddr-densho-1000-269-3) -
Description of childhood home (ddr-densho-1000-269-4) -
Japanese American community activities (ddr-densho-1000-269-5) -
Values passed on by parents (ddr-densho-1000-269-6) -
Attending school with few other Japanese Americans (ddr-densho-1000-269-7) -
Going to Japanese language school on Saturdays (ddr-densho-1000-269-8) -
Having a traditional Japanese bath (ddr-densho-1000-269-9) -
Preparing for mass removal (ddr-densho-1000-269-10) -
First impressions of the Salinas Assembly Center (ddr-densho-1000-269-11) -
Coping with the heat in camp (ddr-densho-1000-269-12) -
(ddr-densho-1000-269-13) -
Family decides to go to Japan (ddr-densho-1000-269-14) -
Attending school in camp, going on outings (ddr-densho-1000-269-15) -
Transferring to Tule Lake (ddr-densho-1000-269-16) -
Family split up, brothers sent to Department of Justice camps (ddr-densho-1000-269-17) -
Joining the Joshidan, participating in morning exercises (ddr-densho-1000-269-18) -
Dealing with uncomfortable living conditions (ddr-densho-1000-269-19) -
Hiding a shortwave radio in camp (ddr-densho-1000-269-20) -
Feeling obligated to renounce citizenship due to family's wishes (ddr-densho-1000-269-21) -
Arrival in Japan: Issei parents still thought Japan had won the war (ddr-densho-1000-269-22) -
Feeling afraid of U.S. soldiers in Japan (ddr-densho-1000-269-23) -
Receiving special food rations (ddr-densho-1000-269-24) -
Working at the U.S. military headquarters in Japan (ddr-densho-1000-269-25) -
Released from job in Japan due to expatriate status (ddr-densho-1000-269-26) -
Adjusting to life in Japan (ddr-densho-1000-269-27) -
Getting married to another Japanese American in Japan (ddr-densho-1000-269-28) -
Regaining U.S. citizenship and returning to California (ddr-densho-1000-269-29) -
Raising children (ddr-densho-1000-269-30) -
Reflections (ddr-densho-1000-269-31) -
Free to use This object is offered under a Creative Commons license. You are free to use it for any non-commercial purpose as long as you properly cite it, and if you share what you have created.

Learn more...

ddr-densho-1000-269-1 (Legacy UID: denshovh-ysumiko-01-0001)

Description of siblings

00:03:48 — Segment 1 of 31

Previous segment Next segment

December 8, 2009

Densho Visual History Collection

Densho

Courtesy of Densho

ddr-densho-1000-269

Sumiko M. Yamamoto

Sumiko M. Yamamoto Interview

02:16:45 — 31 segments

December 8, 2009

Sacramento, California

Nisei female. Born May 12, 1925, in Spreckels, California. Moved frequently with family as a child, eventually settling in Gilroy, California. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, removed to the Salinas Assembly Center, California, and the Poston concentration camp, Arizona. Following father's desire to repatriate to Japan, transferred to Tule Lake concentration camp, California, when it was designated a segregation center. Joined, the Joshidan, a subgroup of the Hoshidan, a pro-Japanese group in Tule Lake. Expatriated to Japan with family, and worked for the U.S. military government in Fukuoka. Remained in Japan until the 1970s, eventually regaining U.S. citizenship and moving to Sacramento, California.

Tom Ikeda, interviewer; Barbara Takei, interviewer; Dana Hoshide, videographer

Densho

Courtesy of Densho

API