"Enemy alien" classification

World War II (231)
"Enemy alien" classification (367)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Alien Enemies Act of 1798, Custodial detention / A-B-C list

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367 items
Mitsuye May Yamada - Joe Yasutake - Tosh Yasutake Interview Segment 47 (ddr-densho-1000-135-47)
vh Mitsuye May Yamada - Joe Yasutake - Tosh Yasutake Interview Segment 47 (ddr-densho-1000-135-47)
Dealing with the aftermath of father's detention: dropping out of school, finding a way to pay the bills
Mitsuye May Yamada - Joe Yasutake - Tosh Yasutake Interview Segment 46 (ddr-densho-1000-135-46)
vh Mitsuye May Yamada - Joe Yasutake - Tosh Yasutake Interview Segment 46 (ddr-densho-1000-135-46)
Finding out that father had been detained at the immigration office, a place where he had previously worked
Joe Yasutake Interview Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-136-6)
vh Joe Yasutake Interview Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-136-6)
Father's status as "enemy alien," adhering to "parole" restrictions

Joseph Yasutake was interviewed together with his sister Mitsuye (Yasutake) Yamada and surviving brother, William Toshio Yasutake, in group sessions on October 8-9, 2002. He was also interviewed individually on October 9, 2002.

Before being contacted by Densho, the Yasutake siblings had planned to conduct their own …

Junko Mizuta Interview Segment 8 (ddr-chi-1-6-8)
vh Junko Mizuta Interview Segment 8 (ddr-chi-1-6-8)
Receiving censored letters from father in various internment camps
Kay Uno Kaneko - Hana Shepard - Mae Matsuzaki Interview Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1007-8-11)
vh Kay Uno Kaneko - Hana Shepard - Mae Matsuzaki Interview Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1007-8-11)
Brother finds archived documents pertaining to father's wartime arrest

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the …

William Hohri Interview Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-264-3)
vh William Hohri Interview Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-264-3)
Witnessing father's arrest by the FBI: "it was just very intense"
Parolee report (ddr-densho-25-116)
doc Parolee report (ddr-densho-25-116)
In 1945, Matahichi Iseri lived in Ontario, Oregon, and reported to the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
Letter regarding parole status (ddr-densho-25-118)
doc Letter regarding parole status (ddr-densho-25-118)
Letter to Matahichi Iseri from an immigration officer, requesting that he meet with an immigration inspector in Ontario, Oregon.
Letter regarding parole termination (ddr-densho-25-117)
doc Letter regarding parole termination (ddr-densho-25-117)
This letter from a Department of Justice officer to Matahichi Iseri informed him that as of November 15, 1945, his parole status as an enemy alien had been terminated.
Letter regarding residence restriction (ddr-densho-25-54)
doc Letter regarding residence restriction (ddr-densho-25-54)
This letter from an Immigration and Naturalization Service parole officer to an Issei man in September 1945 informed him that his previous residence restriction had been lifted and he could now return to the West Coast.
Letter regarding parole appointment (ddr-densho-25-56)
doc Letter regarding parole appointment (ddr-densho-25-56)
This letter to Matahichi Iseri informed him of his appointment to meet with his parole officer.
Letter written by an Issei man (ddr-densho-25-70)
doc Letter written by an Issei man (ddr-densho-25-70)
Matahichi Iseri had been imprisoned in Fort Missoula, Montana, a Department of Justice internment camp for "enemy aliens," since shortly after December 7, 1941. He sometimes wrote letters in his native Japanese, which were read and censored by interpreters and officials from the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
Alien permit for seasonal work leave (ddr-densho-25-18)
doc Alien permit for seasonal work leave (ddr-densho-25-18)
In 1943, the Iseri family lived in Weiser, Idaho, under the seasonal work leave program. This program enabled Japanese Americans to apply for permits to live and work on nearby farms. Kisa Iseri, an Issei, had to apply for a special permit in order to join the rest of her family in Idaho. A list of …
List of regulations specifying conduct to be observed by
doc List of regulations specifying conduct to be observed by "alien enemies" (ddr-densho-25-20)
Matahichi Iseri, considered a "dangerous enemy alien," was arrested on Dec. 7, 1941, and imprisoned in the Department of Justice internment camp at Fort Missoula, Montana. During the war, enemy aliens were not allowed to own contraband articles such as weapons, signal devices, and cameras. They were required to carry certificates of identification at all times, …
The Northwest Times Vol. 2 No. 24 (March 13, 1948) (ddr-densho-229-94)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 2 No. 24 (March 13, 1948) (ddr-densho-229-94)
"Center Blaze Sufferers Get Loss Claims" (p. 1), "Nisei War Memorial Army Raises $1,623 Here" (p. 1), "Union Membership Sought for Issei" (p. 2), "Fights Seizure of Alien's Land for War Claims" (p. 4).
Alien certificate of identification (ddr-densho-23-8)
doc Alien certificate of identification (ddr-densho-23-8)
After the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Issei were required to carry identification documents because of their alien status. (Issei were barred from becoming naturalized citizens until 1952.) This document belonged to Bunshiro Tazuma, a permanent resident of Seattle since 1917. The identification certificate was the same size as an American passport and …
Issei man's letter envelopes (ddr-densho-25-84)
doc Issei man's letter envelopes (ddr-densho-25-84)
These envelopes contained letters written by Matahichi Iseri to his family while he was imprisoned in Fort Missoula, Montana, a Department of Justice internment camp for "enemy aliens."
Alien's leave permit (ddr-densho-25-34)
doc Alien's leave permit (ddr-densho-25-34)
In April 1943, Matahichi Iseri and his family were granted permits to leave the Tule Lake concentration camp to go to Weiser, Idaho, as part of the seasonal work leave program. Because he was an Issei, Matahichi Iseri had to apply for a special permit.
Letter written by an Issei man to his family (ddr-densho-25-68)
doc Letter written by an Issei man to his family (ddr-densho-25-68)
Matahichi Iseri was arrested on December 7, 1941, and taken to Fort Missoula, Montana, where he was detained at a Department of Justice internment camp for "enemy aliens." While he was separated from his wife and children, he was able to send a limited number of letters to them.
Change of Residence Notice (ddr-densho-25-27)
doc Change of Residence Notice (ddr-densho-25-27)
Considered a "dangerous enemy alien," Matahichi Iseri was separated from his family and sent to the Department of Justice internment camp at Fort Missoula, Montana. In June 1942, he received a Change of Residence Notice certificate, which indicated that his request to join his family at the Pinedale Assembly Center in California had been approved.
Letter regarding parole conditions (ddr-densho-25-55)
doc Letter regarding parole conditions (ddr-densho-25-55)
This letter informed Matahichi Iseri that under the conditions of his parole, he was barred from returning to the West Coast.
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