Camp pilgrimages

Annual pilgrimages to the sites of former camps have become important events in the Japanese American community. They are an opportunity for former camp inmates to visit places that dramatically affected their lives, as well as a way for younger generations to learn the history of the Japanese American incarceration. Often the pilgrimages last for a few days and include workshops, tours of the former campsites, and memorial services to honor those who died while incarcerated.

Reflections on the past (633)
Camp pilgrimages (284)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Camp pilgrimages, Sue Kunitomi Embrey, Warren Furutani

284 items
Current view of barn on former Issei dairy farm (ddr-densho-35-47)
img Current view of barn on former Issei dairy farm (ddr-densho-35-47)
An Issei couple operated a large dairy farm in a town formerly known as Days, Washington. The 1,300 acre farm had a property line that extended beyond the area shown here. With the advent of World War II, the Nakashimas were forced to sell their property for a fraction of its worth. This is the interior …
Artifacts, Tule Lake concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-38)
img Artifacts, Tule Lake concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-38)
The Tule Lake Museum, located on the fairgrounds, displays artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. Shown here are parts of a wooden crate that presumably held items belonging to a camp inmate. The 27213 designation was probably the owner's family number.
Coal-burning heater (ddr-densho-35-25)
img Coal-burning heater (ddr-densho-35-25)
The Tule Lake museum, located on the town's fairgrounds, contains artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. Coal-burning heaters such as the one shown here were the primary source of heat for the camp inmates.
Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-15)
img Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-15)
These barracks are one of two owned by a local farmer. The exterior has not been renovated.
Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-6)
img Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-6)
Local farmers now own a few barracks from the Tule Lake concentration camp. The buildings are used for storage, have been made into homes and garages, or are abandoned, like this one. The exterior of the barracks have remained almost untouched since World War II.
Washroom foundation (ddr-densho-35-19)
img Washroom foundation (ddr-densho-35-19)
This is a foundation from an old washroom. The Japanese Americans in camp did not have private washrooms, showers, toilets, or laundries. Each block, made up of approximately twelve barracks, shared such facilities.
Washroom foundation (ddr-densho-35-18)
img Washroom foundation (ddr-densho-35-18)
This is a foundation from an old washroom. The Japanese Americans in camp did not have private washrooms, showers, toilets, or laundries. Each block, made up of approximately twelve barracks, shared such facilities.
Interior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-16)
img Interior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-16)
These barracks are one of two owned by a local farmer. The interior appears to have been untouched since World War II.
Boiler-room foundation (?) (ddr-densho-35-20)
img Boiler-room foundation (?) (ddr-densho-35-20)
This is believed to be the foundation of an old boiler room. The barracks apartments did not have running water. If a Japanese American wanted water, he or she would have to go to a communal facility such as the washroom. The boiler heated the water for the washroom, shower, and laundry.
Monument (ddr-densho-35-2)
img Monument (ddr-densho-35-2)
In 1979, to commemorate the Tule Lake concentration camp, the Japanese American Citizens League and the California State Department of Parks and Recreation erected this monument, located outside the stockade area.
Current view of the Minidoka concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-29)
img Current view of the Minidoka concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-29)
This is the remainder of the Minidoka concentration camp. Currently, the area is used for agriculture. According to a former camp inmate, this chimney is from a room that was used as a waiting area for camp visitors.
Board with apartment number (?) (ddr-densho-35-23)
img Board with apartment number (?) (ddr-densho-35-23)
The Tule Lake Museum, located on the town's fairgrounds, contains a display of artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. This wooden marker is from a barracks apartment.
Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-24)
img Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-24)
The Tule Lake Museum, located on the local fairgrounds, houses a display of artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. The chair was probably handcrafted by a camp inmate.
Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-43)
img Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-43)
Local farmers currently own several barracks from the Tule Lake concentration camp. Some barracks have been made into homes, while others, like the one shown here, have been converted into storage areas.
Current view of barn on former Issei dairy farm (ddr-densho-35-45)
img Current view of barn on former Issei dairy farm (ddr-densho-35-45)
This is the interior of a barn on a large dairy farm operated by an Issei couple in a town formerly known as Days, Washington. Days, Washington no longer exists. This site is currently near the town of Arlington in Snohomish County.
Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-22)
img Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-22)
The Tule Lake Museum is located on the local fairgrounds and contains a display of artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. The large searchlight is from a camp guard tower. Coal-burning stoves such as this one, presumably from barracks apartment, were the main source of heat for the Japanese Americans. To the left of the …
Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-40)
img Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-40)
The Tule Lake Museum, located on the local fairgrounds, houses a display of artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. Shown here are a variety of tea and sake cups, a teapot, and a bunka (Japanese embroidery) picture. The photo below is a panoramic view of the camp.
Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-41)
img Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-41)
The Tule Lake Museum, located on the local fairgrounds, houses a display of artifacts that belonged to Japanese Americans from the Tule Lake concentration camp.
Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-21)
img Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-21)
The Tule Lake Museum is located on the Tule Lake Fairgrounds and houses a display of artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. This is a view of the Tule Lake concentration camp exhibit. The cases primarily contain pottery and artwork that belonged to the camp inmates.
Current view of the Minidoka concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-31)
img Current view of the Minidoka concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-31)
Remains of the Minidoka concentration camp. According to a former camp inmate, the chimney was part of a waiting room for camp visitors. The irrigation canal on the right is where Japanese Americans used to swim.
Memorial plaque (ddr-densho-35-1)
img Memorial plaque (ddr-densho-35-1)
This plaque is part of a monument erected in 1979 by the JACL and California State Department of Parks and Recreation to commemorate the Tule Lake concentration camp.
Barracks and Castle Rock (ddr-densho-35-44)
img Barracks and Castle Rock (ddr-densho-35-44)
A rock formation that the camp inmates called "Castle Rock" can be seen in the background. After obtaining permission to go through the gates, Japanese Americans could climb to the top of the formation.
Guard tower searchlight (ddr-densho-35-26)
img Guard tower searchlight (ddr-densho-35-26)
The Tule Lake Museum, located on the town's fairgrounds, displays artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. Shown here is a searchlight from a guard tower.
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