DDR objects for specified facet term

`facet_id`: "topics", "facility", "format", "genre", or "rights".
`term_id`: A term ID from one of the following lists:

- http://partner.densho.org/vocab/api/0.2/topics.json
- http://partner.densho.org/vocab/api/0.2/facility.json
- http://partner.densho.org/vocab/api/0.2/format.json
- http://partner.densho.org/vocab/api/0.2/genre.json
- http://partner.densho.org/vocab/api/0.2/rights.json

GET /api/0.2/facet/genre/interview/objects/?format=api
HTTP 200 OK
Allow: GET, OPTIONS
Content-Type: application/json
Vary: Accept

{
    "total": 10000,
    "limit": 25,
    "offset": 0,
    "prev_offset": null,
    "next_offset": 25,
    "page_size": 25,
    "this_page": 1,
    "num_this_page": 25,
    "prev_api": "",
    "next_api": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/facet/genre/interview/objects/?format=api&limit=25&offset=25",
    "objects": [
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1021-5",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "0 0/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1021-5/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1021-5/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-5-1-mezzanine-ec9df4a5e1-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-5-1-mezzanine-ec9df4a5e1-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Junji Sarashina Interview",
            "description": "Junji Sarashina was born in 1929 in Lahaina, Hawai'i, the son of a minister of a Buddhist Temple Nishihongan-ji and a teacher of Japanese-style flower arrangement, music, sewing, and cooking. The youngest of five children, Sarashina grew up surrounded by temple members (mostly plantation workers) and their families who enjoyed community picnics and samurai films. When his mother took her children to her hometown of Hiroshima in 1936, Sarashina struggled with Japanese at first. But soon, he got used to things Japanese thanks to the accommodations made by his mother, siblings, and schoolteachers. His older sisters baked Western style cakes and cookies and offered them to Sarashina's schoolmates, helping him to become better accepted. After the Pacific War began, Sarashina's family lost touch with his father who was still in Hawai'i. Later, he learned that his father had been taken by the FBI immediately after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. He was sent to the US mainland, then to a number of different incarceration camps. Sarashina as a junior high school student was mobilized to work at an ammunition factory when the nuclear bomb struck Hiroshima. Although he was not injured, he was irradiated as he entered the city to return home. Sarashina suffered diarrhea and could not eat afterward. When he went back to Hawai'i in 1949, he attended high school again to relearn English. Soon, he found a job at a local radio station in Honolulu. During the Korean War, he volunteered to serve as a military intelligence officer. When he was sent to Korea, he was assigned to a unit led by a judo teacher he knew from Sawtelle, California. The teacher had been his older brother's schoolmate in Hiroshima, and so he took Sarashina under his wing throughout Sarashina's stay in Korea. Although Sarashina says that the American government could do more to support US hibakusha, he also says that he supports the medical checkups offered to American survivors by the Japanese government. In fact, he assisted the establishment of the checkup system in the early 1970s and continued to help the US hibakusha's organization called the American Society of Hiroshima-Nagasaki A-bomb Survivors. He takes pride in assisting many US survivors to obtain Japanese hibakusha techo (certificate of survivorhood) and to receive benefits.",
            "extent": "2:42:23",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1021-5",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 967,
                    "namepart": "Junji Sarashina"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Naoko Wake"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Jose, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "ddr-densho-1021-5-1-mezzanine-ec9df4a5e1-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1021-1",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "1 1/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1021-1/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1021-1/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-1-1-mezzanine-c34c47b317-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-1-1-mezzanine-c34c47b317-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Kathy Yamaguchi Interview",
            "description": "Kathy Yamaguchi (pseudonym) was born in 1948 as a Sansei daughter of a homemaker and a gardener, who had met in the incarceration camp in Topaz, Utah. Yamaguchi calls her father an \"assimilationist\" who mostly associated with non-Asians, and she feels that she, too, did not have a lot of Japanese American friends when she was growing up. When Yamaguchi began to pursue medical education at the University of California, San Francisco, in 1971, she realized how her lack of exposure to professional role models, as well as her experience of growing up in an extremely \"non-verbal\" family, made it a challenge for her to be in a decision-making position. She describes herself as being only \"around on the fringes\" of the Asian American activism in the 1970s. She joined the East Bay Socialist Doctors Group and the Physicians for Social Responsibility, and through members of these groups, she learned in the early 1980s about US survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings. She was struck by their graciousness and gratefulness to physicians who offered the needed medical care. \"Given what they've gone through,\" Yamaguchi says, she felt it necessary to assist US hibakusha. She supports a single-payer health care system, and feels that US survivors are one of many groups that have been disadvantaged by the absence of such a system. Yamaguchi also enjoys working with Japanese physicians from Hiroshima who come biannually to conduct a health checkup for American hibakusha. She joined the Sansei Legacy Project beginning in 1990, which put her more in touch with her feelings about being raised by the parents who had been incarcerated during the war. She also made many more Japanese American friends through her participation in the group. At the time of the interview, Yamaguchi worked as a part-time physician in a public clinic serving the underserved patients in San Francisco's Japantown area.",
            "extent": "1:14:46",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1021-1",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 963,
                    "namepart": "Kathy Yamaguchi"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Naoko Wake"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "ddr-densho-1021-1-1-mezzanine-c34c47b317-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1021-4",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "2 2/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1021-4/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1021-4/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-4-1-mezzanine-b8f1186525-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-4-1-mezzanine-b8f1186525-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Matsuko Hayashi Interview",
            "description": "Born in 1921 in Parlier in Fresno County, California, Matsuko Hayashi (pseudonym) grew up as the second oldest of the eight children of a first-generation immigrant who had come to the United States as a sixteen years old, and his wife who had come as a \"picture bride.\" They raised grapes on three farms that Matsuko's father and his brother had bought. She remembers her father's affection for the family and his dedication to Buddhism, and how busy her mother was raising children. They hired Mexican laborers and operated their business successfully, winning many blue ribbons for their products at state fairs. Matsuko recalls how the family enjoyed going to camping at Yosemite, and how she went to a Japanese school on Saturdays and Sundays, which she found not effective in teaching her Japanese. As for the American school that she attended on weekdays, she recalls how her teachers were prejudiced against the Japanese. When she went to Japan in 1940, she felt her Japanese classmates were biased against Americans like herself. She and other Nisei at her school in Hiroshima spoke in English, making their Japanese classmate believe that the American students were bad-mouthing their Japanese peers. On August 8, 1945, she was injured and lost consciousness after the bombing, but she survived with the help of her Nisei friend that she knew from a sewing school she had attended in Hiroshima. She lost one of her sisters to the bombing, whom her family was able to identify only because of the white nametag she wore. After losing her Japanese husband to the war, Matsuko came back to the United States in 1947, went to a drapery school and worked in Hollywood as a dressmaker, and was remarried to a Nisei who had been a \"no-no-boy\" in Tule Lake and expressed no concern about the fact that Matsuko is a survivor. As a dedicated Buddhist, Matsuko spent her married life focusing on raising family and working at a nursery, and interacted with other US survivors only occasionally. She feels that being attacked by the bomb was like being hit by tsunami; it was shikata ga nai (It couldn't be helped).",
            "extent": "1:23:29",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1021-4",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 966,
                    "namepart": "Matsuko Hayashi"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Naoko Wake"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Jose, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "ddr-densho-1021-4-1-mezzanine-b8f1186525-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1021-8",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "3 3/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1021-8/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1021-8/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-8-1-mezzanine-a91c4d2b40-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-8-1-mezzanine-a91c4d2b40-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Thomas T. Noguchi Interview",
            "description": "Thomas Noguchi was the first Japanese American to serve as the Chief Medical Examiner-Coroner of Los Angeles Country. Well-known for conducting autopsies of public figures such as Robert F. Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, and William Holden, Noguchi was in the position between 1967 and 1982. As a Shin Issei immigrant born in Japan (in 1927) and trained in medicine in both Japan and the United States, Noguchi faced racial prejudice especially early in his career, leading to a dismissal from the position in 1969. The Japanese American community and organizations, including the Japanese American Citizens League, made a concerted effort to reinstate him, a campaign that proved successful. Noguchi felt \"grateful,\" and when US survivors ask for his assistance to organize themselves in 1970, he felt as if it was a good opportunity to give back to the community. He enlisted support for US hibakusha from the California State Senator Mervyn Dymally and the U.S. Congressman Edward Roybal. They authored the bills that would have established a publicly funded program for medical care and treatment of radiation illnesses among US survivors. Although both the state and federal bills failed, Noguchi's collaborative effort with the politicians of color reveal changing racial and class relations in the state and national politics in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Noguchi's interview includes a discussion of his work with key leaders of the US survivors' organization, his communication with the JACL, and the public hearings for the medical bills.",
            "extent": "0:54:01",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1021-8",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 969,
                    "namepart": "Thomas T. Noguchi"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Naoko Wake"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Los Angeles, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "ddr-densho-1021-8-1-mezzanine-a91c4d2b40-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1021-9",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "4 4/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1021-9/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1021-9/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-9-1-mezzanine-4899f812fb-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-9-1-mezzanine-4899f812fb-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Paul Satoh Interview",
            "description": "Born in Osaka, Japan, in 1936, Paul Satoh spent a happy childhood as the only child of a chemist and a homemaker. Satoh's extended family included an uncle who had studied at the University of California, Los Angeles, and his wife, a US-born Nikkei from Hawai'i who occasionally had received a \"care pack from the United States\" that she shared with the Satohs. Although the couple was not affected by the bomb as they were in Tokyo, one of Satoh's other aunts who was in Hiroshima died of radiation sickness. Satoh himself, too, was in Hiroshima as his family's house in Osaka was burned in an air raid early in 1945. Living in his relative's house in Koi, which was about six kilometer from the hypocenter, Satoh remembers hearing a \"real big sound\" at the moment of the explosion. His family decided to take refuge in his grandmother's house in the countryside, and as they walked through Hiroshima, they witnessed people dying on the street from severe burns and injuries. Many years later, his mother died of leukemia, while Satoh himself suffered from thyroid cancer. Immediately after the war, though, Satoh recalled only silence around the bomb, even as many of his classmates passed away because of the delayed radiation effect. He came to the United States in 1960 to study chemistry at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. He married a Polish American woman who was his classmate, and experienced racial discrimination in the era when interracial marriages were still illegal in many US states. Satoh also found that his brother-in-law had worked as a maintenance crew for Enola Gay, the airplane that dropped the bomb on Hiroshima. Satoh worked as a chemist in the for-profit sector, and he occasionally lectured at colleges on applied chemistry. Although he was not part of any US survivors' groups, he was interested in issues of nuclear weaponry and bomb victims. He has assisted research for a book written by his acquaintance about US prisoners of war who died of the bomb in Hiroshima in 1945.",
            "extent": "2:09:44",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1021-9",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 970,
                    "namepart": "Paul Satoh"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Naoko Wake"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "East Lansing, Michigan",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "ddr-densho-1021-9-1-mezzanine-4899f812fb-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1021-7",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "5 5/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1021-7/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1021-7/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-7-1-mezzanine-681d36effc-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-7-1-mezzanine-681d36effc-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Yuriko Furubayashi Interview",
            "description": "Yuriko Furubayashi was born in 1927 in Waimea, Hawai'i, as one of the ten children of the family. Her father had come to Hawai'i from Hiroshima in the mid-1910s as a contract worker on a pineapple plantation. He grew vegetables and kept chickens around the house to help feed the family. Her mother cooked Japanese food only in part because meat was hard to come by. Many of their co-workers on the plantation were Japanese, and Yuriko used to go to the after-school school at Hongan-ji with these co-workers' children. Her peers at the public school included Filipinos, Chinese, Polynesians, Portuguese, and Haoles. When she was ten years old, her uncle and aunt in Los Angeles, who had been successful owners of Olympic Hotel, took her to Japan. They were childless, so their plan was to make Yuriko the family's heir. Yuriko quickly adjusted to the life in Japan and graduated from high school. She was working in an airplane factory when the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Although she was not injured, she was irradiated because she walked through the city on the day after to look for her aunt and uncle. The entire city was still on fire. She saw many corpses and people with severe nuclear burns. She lost one of her uncles to the bomb. She also visited her friend working at an orphanage, and was struck by how many children had lost their parents to the bomb. In 1948, she went to Hawai'i to see her parents, thanks to the arrangement made by her brother who had come to Japan as part of the US occupation force. She decided that she did not want to go back to Hiroshima where memories of the destruction \"depressed\" her. She studied to regain her English and worked at her sister's bakery near Kahoku. She married a baker, and they became successful owners of another bakery named after their oldest son. Yuriko was somewhat worried about radiation effect when she was pregnant with her first child. She gained hibakusha techo (certificate of survivorhood) issued by the Japanese government in the 1960s. She also regularly attends the biannual health checkups conducted by Japanese physicians for American survivors.",
            "extent": "2:52:35",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1021-7",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 968,
                    "namepart": "Yuriko Furubayashi"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Naoko Wake"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Kailua, Hawai‘i",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "ddr-densho-1021-7-1-mezzanine-681d36effc-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1021-10",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "6 6/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1021-10/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1021-10/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-10-2-mezzanine-713f944319-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-10-2-mezzanine-713f944319-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Donald K. Tamaki Interview",
            "description": "Born in 1951, Donald K. Tamaki spent his formative years in the era of the African American and Asian American civil rights movements. He studied at the Asian American Studies program at University of California, Berkeley, and became a lawyer inspired by the significant social and political changes of the 1970s. In the early 1980s, he joined the legal effort to overturn Fred Korematsu,  Gordon Hirabayashi and Minoru Yasui cases. Tamaki also served as the Executive Director of the Asian Law Caucus that served low-income clients in the Bay Area. It was around this time that he became involved with US survivors. He felt that these survivors were important living witnesses to the nuclear destruction, and as such, they would be able to encourage more people to support nuclear-free world. He joined Friends of Hibakusha, a group that supports US hibakusha, and assisted media publicity of the biannual medical checkups of American survivors conducted by Japanese physicians. He says that these medical checkups are not only for spreading anti-nuclear messages, but also for collecting scientific data on hibakusha. Tamaki also states that the overall lack of universal health care in the United States was one of the reasons why US survivors' effort in the 1970s to gain the US government's recognition and free medical treatment for their radiation illnesses failed. The US justification for the use of the atomic bombs, too, was the contributing factor. The interview contains his thoughts on interethnic collaborations, importance of shifting the political \"middle,\" military necessity and national security, and nuclear threats.",
            "extent": "1:12:12",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1021-10",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 370,
                    "namepart": "Donald K. Tamaki"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Naoko Wake"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "ddr-densho-1021-10-2-mezzanine-713f944319-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-csujad-56-2",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "7 7/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-csujad-56-2/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-csujad-56-2/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-csujad-56/ddr-csujad-56-2-mezzanine-cffae2ee28-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-csujad-56/ddr-csujad-56-2-mezzanine-cffae2ee28-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Interview with Takeshi Kameoka, (audio)",
            "description": "Sonoma County resident Takeshi Kameoka was interviewed on April 15, 1978, by a Sonoma State University student for the North Bay Ethnic Archive Project. He talks about early life, moving to Japan with his family following father's death, returning to US and taking up vegetable farming.  Discusses church as center of Japanese American community. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: <a href=\"http://cdm16855.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16855coll4/id/612\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\">nbea_oral_kameoka</a>",
            "extent": "0.033032407",
            "links_children": "ddr-csujad-56-2",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "interviewee",
                    "namepart": "Kameoka, Takeshi"
                },
                {
                    "role": "publisher",
                    "namepart": "Sonoma State University"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Geographic communities -- California -- San Jose",
                    "id": "274"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Kibei",
                    "id": "45"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Industry and employment -- Agriculture",
                    "id": "6"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Religion and churches",
                    "id": "29"
                }
            ],
            "format": "av",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Sonoma State University Library, Rohnert Park, California",
            "rights": "nocc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Watsonville, Sebastopol, Petaluma",
            "facility": [
                {
                    "term": "Granada (Amache)",
                    "id": "4"
                }
            ],
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "ddr-csujad-56-2-mezzanine-cffae2ee28-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-csujad-56-1",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "8 8/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-csujad-56-1/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-csujad-56-1/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-csujad-56/ddr-csujad-56-1-mezzanine-69ba9364a4-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-csujad-56/ddr-csujad-56-1-mezzanine-69ba9364a4-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Interview with George Hamamoto, (audio)",
            "description": "Sonoma County resident George Hamamoto was interviewed on June 20, 1978, by a Sonoma State University student for the North Bay Ethnic Archive Project. He discusses growing up in Sebastopol, the family grocery store, removal to Assembly Center in Merced, then incarceration at Granada (Amache) camp. Discusses organization and administration of camp, and return to Napa area following the war. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: <a href=\"http://cdm16855.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16855coll4/id/611\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\">nbea_oral_hamamoto</a>",
            "extent": "0.030763889",
            "links_children": "ddr-csujad-56-1",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "interviewee",
                    "namepart": "Hamomoto, George"
                },
                {
                    "role": "publisher",
                    "namepart": "Sonoma State University"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Community activities -- Associations and organizations",
                    "id": "16"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Industry and employment -- Small business -- Grocery stores",
                    "id": "371"
                },
                {
                    "term": "World War II -- Concentration camps -- Living conditions",
                    "id": "67"
                },
                {
                    "term": "World War II -- Leaving camp -- Returning home",
                    "id": "106"
                }
            ],
            "format": "av",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Sonoma State University Library, Rohnert Park, California",
            "rights": "nocc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Sebastopol; Santa Rosa; Petaluma;",
            "facility": [
                {
                    "term": "Granada (Amache)",
                    "id": "4"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Merced",
                    "id": "19"
                }
            ],
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "ddr-csujad-56-1-mezzanine-69ba9364a4-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-21",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "9 9/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-21/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-21/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-kben_g-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-kben_g-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Ben Kuroki - Shige Kuroki Interview",
            "description": "Ben Kuroki, Nisei male. Born May 16, 1917, in Hershey, Nebraska. Admitted to the Army Air Corps and flew thirty missions in Europe in a B-24 as a tailgunner and top turret gunner. Earned two Distinguished Flying Crosses and was acclaimed as the first Nisei war hero. Spoke at Heart Mountain, Wyoming, and two other camps in order to help encourage draft recruitment. Subpoenaed as a witness in the conspiracy trial of Heart Mountain's Fair Play Committee leaders. Later became the only Nisei to service in active combat with the Air Corps in the Pacific Theater, and flew twenty-eight additional missions over Japan. After World War II, became the first Japanese American editor of a general newspaper in Nebraska, and later edited newspapers in suburban Michigan and Southern California.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "01:22:47",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-21",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 163,
                    "namepart": "Ben Kuroki"
                },
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 169,
                    "namepart": "Shige Kuroki"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Chin"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Camarillio, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-kben_g-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-19",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "10 10/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-19/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-19/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-uclifford-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-uclifford-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Clifford Uyeda  Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born January 14, 1917, in Olympia, Washington. Raised in Washington before attending the University of Wisconsin, where he graduated in 1940. Earned medical degree from Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, and completed his residency at Harvard Medical School in 1949. Served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War and worked as a pediatrician in San Francisco. While president of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), worked to support the redress movement of the 1980s.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "01:43:47",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-19",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 162,
                    "namepart": "Clifford Uyeda"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Chin"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-uclifford-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-9",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "11 11/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-9/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-9/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-kdave-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-kdave-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Dave Kawamoto Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born December 16, 1916, in Cupertino, California. Attended San Jose State College, where he was an NCAA wrestling champion. Immediately after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, tried to enlist in the U.S. Air Corps, but was refused on account of his Japanese ancestry. Was one semester short of earning a business degree when he was removed with his family to the Pomona Assembly Center, California, and the Heart Mountain concentration camp, Wyoming. Was one of the Heart Mountain resisters of conscience, and stood trial in Cheyenne, Wyoming, for resisting the draft in 1944. After World War II, went into civil service and a fruit-selling business. Mr. Kawamoto was posthumously awarded his business degree from San Jose State.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "00:40:47",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-9",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 155,
                    "namepart": "Dave Kawamoto"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Chin"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Los Angeles, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-kdave-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-6",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "12 12/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-6/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-6/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-hsam-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-hsam-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Sam Horino Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born July 17, 1914, in Gardena, California. Passively resisted \"evacuation\" in 1942, forcing two soldiers to carry him out of his home. Incarcerated at Heart Mountain concentration camp, Wyoming, and became one of the steering committee leaders of the Fair Play Committee (FPC). Was tried along with the other FPC leaders and was convicted to conspiracy to counsel draft evasion. Served time in Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary, Kansas, and then returned home to California.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "00:47:43",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-6",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 152,
                    "namepart": "Sam Horino"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Monterey Park, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-hsam-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-29",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "13 13/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-29/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-29/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-hfred-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-hfred-02-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Fred Hirasuna Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born February 11, 1908, in Lodi, California. Resettled voluntarily to Mankato, Minnesota, prior to mass removal. Resettled in central California in 1947. Member of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) since 1929. Became active in redress movement as fundraiser and lobbyist for Central California District Council of JACL. Mr. Hirasuna passed away on February 12, 2004.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "00:49:10",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-29",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 20,
                    "namepart": "Fred Hirasuna"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Chin"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-hfred-02-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-10",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "14 14/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-10/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-10/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-kmits-03-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-kmits-03-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Mits Koshiyama Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born August 7, 1924, in Mountain View, California. Grew up in the Santa Clara Valley, California, working on his family's leased strawberry farm. In June of 1942, he was involuntarily \"evacuated\" to Santa Anita Assembly Center, California, then to Heart Mountain concentration camp, Wyoming. Graduated from high school in camp and at the age of 19, refused induction into the military on the grounds that the incarceration violated his Constitutional rights as an American citizen. Served two years at McNeil Island federal penitentiary, Washington. Later resettled in California and established a flower nursery business with his brother.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "00:37:46",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-10",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 125,
                    "namepart": "Mits Koshiyama"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Los Angeles, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-kmits-03-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-7",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "15 15/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-7/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-7/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-eart-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-eart-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Art Emi Interview",
            "description": "Brother of Frank Emi, leader of the Heart Mountain Fair Play Committee (FPC). While incarcerated, helped the FPC organize.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "00:08:40",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-7",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 153,
                    "namepart": "Art Emi"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Chin"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Los Angeles, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-eart-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-8",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "16 16/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-8/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-8/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-kyosh-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-kyosh-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Yosh Kuromiya Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born April 1923 in Sierra Madre, California. Was pursuing a degree in art at Pasadena Junior College at the time of mass removal. While incarcerated at Heart Mountain, Wyoming, continued his artistic pursuits, drawing sketches and designing posters, etc. for various camp projects. Resisted the draft at age 21, and was indicted in 1944 for draft evasion. After serving time in prison, worked as a gardener before becoming a landscape architect in the late 1950s.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "00:28:28",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-8",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 154,
                    "namepart": "Yosh Kuromiya"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Chin"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Los Angeles, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-kyosh-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-25",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "17 17/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-25/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-25/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-droger-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-droger-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Roger Daniels Interview",
            "description": "White male. Born December 1, 1927, in New York City, New York. Charles Phelps Taft Professor Emeritus of History, University of Cincinnati. Served as a consultant to the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians from 1981 to 1983. Has researched and written numerous books about the Japanese American experience, including Prisoners Without Trial: Japanese Americans in World War II and American Concentration Camps: A Documentary History of the Relocation and Incarceration of Japanese Americans, 1941-1945.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "00:37:11",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-25",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 166,
                    "namepart": "Roger Daniels"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Chin"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Heart Mountain, Wyoming",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-droger-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-14",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "18 18/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-14/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-14/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-ygrace-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-ygrace-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Grace Kubota Ybarra Interview",
            "description": "Sansei female. Daughter of Guntaro Kubota, an Issei immigrant and one of the leaders of the Heart Mountain Fair Play Committee. Incarcerated at Heart Mountain, Wyoming, as a child, and has memories of receiving letters with cartoon drawings from her father while he was in prison.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "00:14:37",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-14",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 157,
                    "namepart": "Grace Kubota Ybarra"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Chin"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-ygrace-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-27",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "19 19/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-27/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-27/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-nandy-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-nandy-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Andy Noguchi Interview",
            "description": "Sansei male. President of the Florin chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League in 1999, and one of the authors of a resolution to recognize the constitutional stand of the World War II resisters of conscience.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "00:07:15",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-27",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 167,
                    "namepart": "Andy Noguchi"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Merced, California",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-nandy-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-13",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "20 20/{'value': 10000, 'relation': 'gte'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-13/?format=api",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-13/?format=api",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-kgloria-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-kgloria-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Gloria Kubota Interview",
            "description": "Nisei female. Born June 6, 1916, in Santa Clara County, California. Raised in Santa Clara, and met and married Issei Guntaro Kubota, one of the leaders of the Heart Mountain Fair Play Committee. During World War II, incarcerated at Heart Mountain concentration camp, Wyoming, along with daughter. Gave birth to a son in camp. Husband Guntaro Kubota was arrested for conspiracy to counsel draft evasion, and served time at Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary in Kansas. Eventually Guntaro's conviction was thrown out, and the family moved back to Los Gatos, California.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
            "extent": "00:32:53",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-13",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 156,
                    "namepart": "Gloria Kubota"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Chin"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
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            "description": "Nisei male. Born November 27, 1912, on Bainbridge Island, Washington. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, moved to Denver and took a job as English Editor of a Japanese American vernacular newspaper, the Rocky Shimpo. As editor, wrote about and supported the Fair Play Committee in Heart Mountain concentration camp. Was charged and tried for conspiracy to counsel draft evasion, and was acquitted on the grounds of the First Amendment and freedom of the press. Mr. Omura was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Asian American Journalists Association.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
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            "description": "Nisei male. Born November 27, 1912, on Bainbridge Island, Washington. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, moved to Denver and took a job as English Editor of a Japanese American vernacular newspaper, the Rocky Shimpo. As editor, wrote about and supported the Fair Play Committee in Heart Mountain concentration camp. Was charged and tried for conspiracy to counsel draft evasion, and was acquitted on the grounds of the First Amendment and freedom of the press. Mr. Omura was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Asian American Journalists Association.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
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            "description": "Nisei female, born in 1925. Incarcerated at Heart Mountain concentration camp, Wyoming, during World War II. Was on the staff of the camp's newspaper, the <i>Heart Mountain Sentinel</i>.<p>(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, <i>Conscience and the Constitution</i>, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)",
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            "title": "Bill Hosokawa Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born in Seattle on January 30, 1915, and attended Washington grade school, Garfield High School and the University of Washington. He grew up as a typical Nisei, working summers in Alaska salmon canneries and Western Avenue produce brokerages to pay for his education. He became interested in writing at Garfield where he was sports editor of the school paper. While attending the University he worked at the weekly Japanese American Courier published by the late Jimmie Sakamoto. A faculty adviser at the University urged Hosokawa to drop out of the journalism school \"because no newspaper in the country would hire a Japanese boy.\" Hosokawa rejected the advice, but when he graduated in 1937 he found the professor was right. After working as a male secretary writing letters, Hosokawa and his bride, the former Alice Miyake of Portland, Oregon, went to Singapore in 1938 to help launch an English language daily. A year and a half later Hosokawa moved to Shanghai to work on an American-owned monthly magazine, the Far Eastern Review. Then, sensing the inevitability of war, he returned to Seattle in 1941 just five weeks before the attack on Pearl Harbor. When war came, Hosokawa served as executive director of Seattle JACL's Emergency Defense Council helping people in the community to cope. He and his family were removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington. When other Seattleites were moved to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, Hosokawa and his wife and infant son were sent to Heart Mountain, Wyoming. Later, he learned he had been separated from his Seattle friends because he was considered a potential troublemaker. He was in Heart Mountain for 14 months, working as editor of the camp newspaper, the Heart Mountain Sentinel, before being released to join the Des Moines, Iowa Register in 1943. In 1946 he moved to Denver to work on the Denver Post. In 38 years at The Post he held such assignments as executive news editor, assistant managing editor and Sunday editor. He covered the Japanese peace treaty in San Francisco in 1951, the Summit meeting in Paris in 1960 and the Zengakuren student riots in Japan that same year. He also had assignments as war correspondent in Korea and Vietnam, and for 17 years was editor of Empire, the Post's prize-winning Sunday magazine. For his last seven years at the Post Hosokawa was editor of the editorial page -- a Japanese American imprisoned during World War II as a potential security risk who now directed the opinion section of a major American newspaper. After retiring from the Post in 1984 he served the Rocky Mountain News as ombudsman columnist for seven years. Hosokawa has taught journalism classes at the University of Colorado, University of Northern Colorado and University of Wyoming. He wrote a weekly comment column called \"From the Frying Pan\" in JACL's weekly Pacific Citizen from 1942 until 1999. Among other honors, Hosokawa is a former president of the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors and a member of that organization's Hall of Fame, a charter member of the Denver Press Club Hall of Fame. He was named JACL's Nisei of the Biennium in 1958, and has published 12 books. Hosokawa and his wife Alice, who died in 1998, had four children.",
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