Department of Justice camps

More than 5,500 Japanese immigrants (Issei) were arrested by the FBI following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Most were sent first to temporary Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) detention stations and then transferred to Department of Justice (DOJ) internment camps, where they waited to appear before the Alien Enemy Hearing Board. These hearings determined whether the Issei would remain in the internment camps or be "released" to the War Relocation Authority (WRA) concentration camps. After the hearings, most of the Issei were sent to U.S. Army internment camps. The U.S. Army, charged with detaining military prisoners of war (POWs), then returned the Issei internees to DOJ control. The DOJ camps also interned Italian and German nationals and Japanese Latin Americans. Most of the DOJ internment camps held only men who had been separated from their families, but three camps housed single women and families. The camps were run by the INS, part of the Department of Justice.

World War II (54)
Department of Justice camps (182)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Crystal City (detention facility), Fort Lincoln (Bismarck) (detention facility), Fort Missoula (detention facility), Fort Stanton (detention facility), J. Edgar Hoover, Kenedy (detention facility), Kooskia (detention facility), Old Raton (detention facility), Santa Fe (detention facility), Seagoville (detention facility), Sites of incarceration

182 items
Tennis team (ddr-densho-200-3)
img Tennis team (ddr-densho-200-3)
Front, second from right: Shinjiro Morita.
Group photo in Santa Fe (ddr-densho-200-1)
img Group photo in Santa Fe (ddr-densho-200-1)
Extreme right, back row, Shinjiro Morita. Front second left, Kikuzo Uyeminami.
An Oral History with Mitsuhiko H. Shimizu (ddr-csujad-29-57)
vh An Oral History with Mitsuhiko H. Shimizu (ddr-csujad-29-57)
Issei community leader and businessman in Los Angeles's Little Tokyo recounts his arrest by Federal Bureau of Investigation after Pearl Harbor, his experiences in internment camps in North Dakota and Louisiana, and the Manzanar incarceration camp, California. This oral history was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project, Oral History Program, CSU Fullerton. Transcript is ...
Letter from Yoshihiko Matsuura to Kiyoko Noda, April 30, 1949 (ddr-csujad-10-3)
doc Letter from Yoshihiko Matsuura to Kiyoko Noda, April 30, 1949 (ddr-csujad-10-3)
A letter from Yoshihiko Matsuura, an internee in the Crystal City Internment Camp, Texas, to his grandmother, Kiyoko Noda, in Lima, Peru. He includes updates on day to day life in the Crystal City camp, including the event on the Emperor's birthday [April 29] and a play performed in the camp. He details the Boy Scouts ...
Letter from Kiyoko Matsuura to Kikuko Noda, January 26, 1945 (ddr-csujad-10-2)
doc Letter from Kiyoko Matsuura to Kikuko Noda, January 26, 1945 (ddr-csujad-10-2)
A letter from Kiyoko Matsuura, an internee at the Crystal City Internment Camp, to her mother, Kikuko Noda in Lima, Peru. In the letter, she describes the celebration of the New Year [1945] at the internment camp and expresses her appreciation for the gifts sent by her mother. According to her letter, it appears that Kiyoko ...
Letter from Kiyoko Matsuura to Mizuko Noda, September 5, 1944 (ddr-csujad-10-1)
doc Letter from Kiyoko Matsuura to Mizuko Noda, September 5, 1944 (ddr-csujad-10-1)
A letter from Kiyoko Matsuura, an internee in the Crystal City Internment Camp, to her sister in Lima Peru. In the letter, she includes updates on day to day life in the Crystal City camp and expresses her appreciation for the money sent by her father. Kiyoko states that she is anxiously waiting for a ship ...
An oral history with Ronald Tanimoto (ddr-csujad-29-44)
av An oral history with Ronald Tanimoto (ddr-csujad-29-44)
An oral interview with Ronald Tanimoto, internee at the Crystal City Department of Justice internment camp. The interview was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. Transcript is found in item: csufccop_jaoh_0144. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: 2473_T01
An Oral History with Reverend Seytsu Takahashi (ddr-csujad-29-58)
vh An Oral History with Reverend Seytsu Takahashi (ddr-csujad-29-58)
Issei Buddhist bishop and superintendent of Kayasan Temple in Little Tokyo since 1931 recounts his wartime experiences and internment at Fort Missoula, Montana; Livingstone, Louisiana; and Crystal City, Texas. Transcribed in both Japanese and English. This oral history was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project, Oral History Program, CSU Fullerton. Transcript is found in ...
Letter written by an Issei man (ddr-densho-25-70)
doc Letter written by an Issei man (ddr-densho-25-70)
Matahichi Iseri had been imprisoned in Fort Missoula, Montana, a Department of Justice internment camp for "enemy aliens," since shortly after December 7, 1941. He sometimes wrote letters in his native Japanese, which were read and censored by interpreters and officials from the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
Letter written by an Issei man to his family (ddr-densho-25-68)
doc Letter written by an Issei man to his family (ddr-densho-25-68)
Matahichi Iseri was arrested on December 7, 1941, and taken to Fort Missoula, Montana, where he was detained at a Department of Justice internment camp for "enemy aliens." While he was separated from his wife and children, he was able to send a limited number of letters to them.
Change of Residence Notice (ddr-densho-25-27)
doc Change of Residence Notice (ddr-densho-25-27)
Considered a "dangerous enemy alien," Matahichi Iseri was separated from his family and sent to the Department of Justice internment camp at Fort Missoula, Montana. In June 1942, he received a Change of Residence Notice certificate, which indicated that his request to join his family at the Pinedale Assembly Center in California had been approved.
Letter written by an Issei man to his family (ddr-densho-25-26)
doc Letter written by an Issei man to his family (ddr-densho-25-26)
While he was at Fort Missoula, Montana, a Department of Justice internment camp for enemy aliens, Matahichi Iseri wrote to his wife and children, who were still awaiting a relocation assignment from the WRA.
Issei's hearing notice (ddr-densho-25-71)
doc Issei's hearing notice (ddr-densho-25-71)
Matahichi Iseri was arrested as an "enemy alien." Those arrested were required to appear before an alien enemy hearing board.
Letter from John J. McCloy, Assistant Secretary of War, to Dillon S. Myer (ddr-densho-67-22)
doc Letter from John J. McCloy, Assistant Secretary of War, to Dillon S. Myer (ddr-densho-67-22)
Letter from John J. McCloy, Assistant Secretary of War, to Dillon S. Myer, Director of the War Relocation Authority, regarding transfer of family members to join issei in Department of Justice internment camps. McCloy wary of such transfers, as he believes they would subject Nisei to "issei contamination." Favors instead paroling Issei out of internment camps ...
Santa Fe internees (ddr-densho-123-2)
img Santa Fe internees (ddr-densho-123-2)
First row, fourth from left is Mr. Mamizuka of Seattle, Washington.
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