Department of Justice camps

More than 5,500 Japanese immigrants (Issei) were arrested by the FBI following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Most were sent first to temporary Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) detention stations and then transferred to Department of Justice (DOJ) internment camps, where they waited to appear before the Alien Enemy Hearing Board. These hearings determined whether the Issei would remain in the internment camps or be "released" to the War Relocation Authority (WRA) concentration camps. After the hearings, most of the Issei were sent to U.S. Army internment camps. The U.S. Army, charged with detaining military prisoners of war (POWs), then returned the Issei internees to DOJ control. The DOJ camps also interned Italian and German nationals and Japanese Latin Americans. Most of the DOJ internment camps held only men who had been separated from their families, but three camps housed single women and families. The camps were run by the INS, part of the Department of Justice.

Department of Justice camps (178)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Crystal City (detention facility), Fort Lincoln (Bismarck) (detention facility), Fort Missoula (detention facility), Fort Stanton (detention facility), J. Edgar Hoover, Kenedy (detention facility), Kooskia (detention facility), Old Raton (detention facility), Santa Fe (detention facility), Seagoville (detention facility), Sites of incarceration

178 items
Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-9)
doc Letter to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-9)
Correspondence from Kinuta Uno's daughter discussing their evacuation instructions, being sent to Fresno Assembly Center, and being able to return to their land after the war.
Postcard send to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-21)
doc Postcard send to Kinuta Uno at Fort Missoula (ddr-densho-324-21)
Correspondence from S. Hayashi updating Kinuta Uno on his family.
Marion Tsutakawa Kanemoto Interview Segment 28 (ddr-densho-1000-148-28)
vh Marion Tsutakawa Kanemoto Interview Segment 28 (ddr-densho-1000-148-28)
Receiving censored letters from father; feeling the uncertainty of future
Charles Oihe Hamasaki Interview Segment 20 (ddr-densho-1000-274-20)
vh Charles Oihe Hamasaki Interview Segment 20 (ddr-densho-1000-274-20)
Receiving a hearing while in Bismarck

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

Tom Akashi Interview Segment 51 (ddr-densho-1000-164-51)
vh Tom Akashi Interview Segment 51 (ddr-densho-1000-164-51)
Many years later, piecing together father's wartime experiences in a Department of Justice internment camp
An Oral History with Reverend Seytsu Takahashi - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-58-1)
vh An Oral History with Reverend Seytsu Takahashi - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-58-1)
Issei Buddhist bishop and superintendent of Kayasan Temple in Little Tokyo since 1931 recounts his wartime experiences and internment at Fort Missoula, Montana; Livingstone, Louisiana; and Crystal City, Texas. Transcribed in both Japanese and English. This oral history was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project, Oral History Program, CSU Fullerton. Audio is found in ...
An Oral History with Mitsuhiko H. Shimizu - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-57-1)
vh An Oral History with Mitsuhiko H. Shimizu - Segment 1 (ddr-csujad-29-57-1)
Issei community leader and businessman in Los Angeles's Little Tokyo recounts his arrest by Federal Bureau of Investigation after Pearl Harbor, his experiences in internment camps in North Dakota and Louisiana, and the Manzanar incarceration camp, California. This oral history was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project, Oral History Program, CSU Fullerton. Translated into ...
Tokio Yamane Interview Segment 29 (ddr-densho-1000-432-29)
vh Tokio Yamane Interview Segment 29 (ddr-densho-1000-432-29)
The train ride to the Santa Fe internment camp (Japanese language)

This interview was conducted in Japanese. The transcript is a translation of the original interview. This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material ...

Men in casual clothing posing with Henrietta Schoen, signed on reverse (ddr-densho-223-51)
img Men in casual clothing posing with Henrietta Schoen, signed on reverse (ddr-densho-223-51)
Caption on reverse: "To Miss. H. Schoen; Yasukichi Yasumura; Toyokichi Okumura; Yasabiro Saiki; Tatsuo Nakaji; Seiyo Yuki; Mantaro Ninomiya; [illegible]; Seijuburo M[?]; Genko Saigusa; Shigeichi Nakamora; Shijiro K[?]; Tom [illegible]; Masatana Mitani; Nakomura Chohochiro; Dr. S Furugachi; Rev. D. Tana; Noboji Tokushiro; [illegible]; Keizo Wadu; Hiroshi Suzoki; Gensaku Koizumi; K. Sakagami; Jamie [illegible]; Kanekichi Takido."
Letter to Henrietta Schoen from Takuyo Togawa (ddr-densho-223-59)
doc Letter to Henrietta Schoen from Takuyo Togawa (ddr-densho-223-59)
A letter from the wife of a medical staffer at Sante Fe thanking Henrietta Schoen for her correspondence.
Letter to Henrietta Schoen from Takeshi Ban (ddr-densho-223-58)
doc Letter to Henrietta Schoen from Takeshi Ban (ddr-densho-223-58)
A letter thanking Henrietta Schoen for her kindness while Takeshi Ban was at Sante Fe.
Letter to Miss Schoen from Harry K. Oye (ddr-densho-223-60)
doc Letter to Miss Schoen from Harry K. Oye (ddr-densho-223-60)
A letter thanking Henrietta Schoen for her care of Harry K. Oye during his time at Sante Fe and informing her of his new life at Poston. Includes a clipping of a Bible verse, Matthew 5, 44 in German.
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