Camp pilgrimages

Annual pilgrimages to the sites of former camps have become important events in the Japanese American community. They are an opportunity for former camp inmates to visit places that dramatically affected their lives, as well as a way for younger generations to learn the history of the Japanese American incarceration. Often the pilgrimages last for a few days and include workshops, tours of the former campsites, and memorial services to honor those who died while incarcerated.

Camp pilgrimages (244)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Camp pilgrimages, Sue Kunitomi Embrey, Warren Furutani

244 items
Tule Lake pilgrimage (ddr-densho-11-4)
img Tule Lake pilgrimage (ddr-densho-11-4)
Pilgrimage attendees examine an old latrine foundation from Block 73. The holes were for toilets, which were situated at each end of the facility. Group showers were in the middle.
Evening program, Tule Lake pilgrimage (ddr-densho-11-9)
img Evening program, Tule Lake pilgrimage (ddr-densho-11-9)
At the Tule Lake pilgrimage, an evening program was held to honor the inmates and remember the incarceration experience. The person shown here is playing a shime taiko drum while slides taken during the incarceration are being shown in the background.
Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-5)
img Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-5)
These barracks housed Japanese Americans during World War II. There were approximately twelve barracks to a block and six apartments per barracks. Each apartment was 100 x 20 feet and housed one family. The exterior of these barracks have remained virtually untouched since World War II.
Current view of the Minidoka concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-28)
img Current view of the Minidoka concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-28)
Remainder of the Minidoka concentration camp. Currently, the area is used for agriculture. According to a former camp inmate, this chimney is from a room that was used as a waiting area for camp visitors.
Current view of the Minidoka concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-30)
img Current view of the Minidoka concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-30)
Remains of the Minidoka concentration camp. According to a former camp inmate, this is the entry to a waiting room for camp visitors.
Artifacts, Tule Lake concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-38)
img Artifacts, Tule Lake concentration camp (ddr-densho-35-38)
The Tule Lake Museum, located on the fairgrounds, displays artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. Shown here are parts of a wooden crate that presumably held items belonging to a camp inmate. The 27213 designation was probably the owner's family number.
Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-21)
img Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-21)
The Tule Lake Museum is located on the Tule Lake Fairgrounds and houses a display of artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. This is a view of the Tule Lake concentration camp exhibit. The cases primarily contain pottery and artwork that belonged to the camp inmates.
Memorial plaque (ddr-densho-35-1)
img Memorial plaque (ddr-densho-35-1)
This plaque is part of a monument erected in 1979 by the JACL and California State Department of Parks and Recreation to commemorate the Tule Lake concentration camp.
Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-40)
img Artifacts (ddr-densho-35-40)
The Tule Lake Museum, located on the local fairgrounds, houses a display of artifacts from the Tule Lake concentration camp. Shown here are a variety of tea and sake cups, a teapot, and a bunka (Japanese embroidery) picture. The photo below is a panoramic view of the camp.
Family at a camp pilgrimage (ddr-densho-62-1)
img Family at a camp pilgrimage (ddr-densho-62-1)
Watanabe family visiting the former site of Tule Lake concentration camp, California.
Pacific Citizen, Vol. 79, No. 25 (December 20-27, 1974) (ddr-pc-46-50)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 79, No. 25 (December 20-27, 1974) (ddr-pc-46-50)
Holiday issue organized into sections A 1-12, B 1-12, C 1-12, and D 1-12. Selected article titles: "Sansei Returns to Tule Lake" (pp. A-1, A-3), "Fears in Tule Lake: Evacuees Remember Them" (pp. A-1, A-3-A-4), "Seattle Nihonmachi: Beat of the '20s and '30s" (pp. B-1, B-9-B-10), "Giri: Righteous Way: Inside Tanforan, Topaz" (pp. B-4, B-8-B-9), and ...
Pacific Citizen, Vol. 82, No. 16 (April 23, 1976) (ddr-pc-48-16)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 82, No. 16 (April 23, 1976) (ddr-pc-48-16)
Selected article titles: "WW2 Camp for Hawaii Nikkei Recalled" (p. 1), "Honouliuli Internment Camp: Oahu Footnote to a Dark Chapter" (pp. 1-2), "'Go for Broke!' vs. 'Farewell to Manzanar'" (p. 2), and "Steel Cross at Tule Lake Camp Site to Be Rededicated at 2nd Pilgrimage" (p. 4).
Pacific Citizen, Vol. 94, No. 25 (June 25, 1982) (ddr-pc-54-25)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 94, No. 25 (June 25, 1982) (ddr-pc-54-25)
Selected article titles: "Vietnamese Internment in Sac'to Suggested" (pp. 1, 8), "Rohwer Monument Dedicated in a Memorial Day Service" (pp. 1-2), "Bitter Memories Recalled at Tule Lake Pilgrimage" (p. 2), "Inouye Offers Nuclear Plan to Avoid a Holocaust" (p. 2), and "The Hattiesburg Story: One Vet of Famed 442nd RCT Lives Near Shelby" (p. 9).
Pacific Citizen, Vol. 104, No. 19 (May 15, 1987) (ddr-pc-59-19)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 104, No. 19 (May 15, 1987) (ddr-pc-59-19)
Selected article titles: "Japan Names Nikkei Honorees" (p. 1), "Asian Groups Vow to Prevent Future 'Vincent Chin' Cases" (pp. 1, 8), "Government Still Denies Constitutional Violations, Author Drinnon Says" (pp. 1, 3), and "Jennings: AA Journalists Can Link Cultures" (p. 8).
A memorial headstone at Linkville Cemetery (ddr-densho-294-26)
img A memorial headstone at Linkville Cemetery (ddr-densho-294-26)
Writing on headstone: "In Memory of Deceased 1942-1945 Tule Lake WRA."
API