Living conditions

The "assembly centers" were hastily erected quarters located throughout the West Coast at fairgrounds, racetracks and other similar facilities. Conditions at these locations were appalling. People were housed in animal stalls and barracks with communal bathrooms and mess halls. Privacy was next to nonexistent. Most families lived in a 20-by-20-foot room separated from the next "apartment" by wood partitions that did not reach the ceiling. Shortages of food and deplorable sanitation were common. Overcrowding, uncertainty, and stress created tension in the "assembly centers," even as the demoralized camp inmates tried to improve living conditions.

Living conditions (278)

278 items
Richard M. Murakami Interview Segment 5 (ddr-manz-1-161-5)
vh Richard M. Murakami Interview Segment 5 (ddr-manz-1-161-5)
Memories of "evacuation day," arriving at the Marysville Assembly Center, California
Art Abe Interview Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-206-17)
vh Art Abe Interview Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-206-17)
Feeling bitter upon being removed: "I couldn't believe what the government was doing to us"
June Takahashi Segment 21 (ddr-densho-1000-88-21)
vh June Takahashi Segment 21 (ddr-densho-1000-88-21)
Conditions in Puyallup Assembly Center: barracks, food, activities
Shigeko Sese Uno Segment 15 (ddr-densho-1000-98-15)
vh Shigeko Sese Uno Segment 15 (ddr-densho-1000-98-15)
Caring for a newborn baby in Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington
Louise Kashino Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-31-16)
vh Louise Kashino Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-31-16)
Working as a "tray girl" in Puyallup Assembly Center

For the first hour of this interview, an additional camera crew from KCTS Television was also present.

Letter from Rose Tani to Rev. Miller, 1942 May 10 (ddr-csujad-20-17)
doc Letter from Rose Tani to Rev. Miller, 1942 May 10 (ddr-csujad-20-17)
Vociferous indictment of the Ladies aid of the Methodist Church for holding a luncheon picnic for "Japanese leaving Santa Anita," and similar efforts, stating that such overtures to "entertain enemies of their native land" are "traitor[ous]" and "disgrace the good sense of American woman hood." See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization ...
Harry Kawahara Interview Segment 5 (ddr-densho-1000-368-5)
vh Harry Kawahara Interview Segment 5 (ddr-densho-1000-368-5)
Vivid memories of camp at age ten: "that made an impact"

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department ...

Toru Sakahara - Kiyo Sakahara Interview II Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1000-77-4)
vh Toru Sakahara - Kiyo Sakahara Interview II Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1000-77-4)
Gambling in the Puyallup Assembly Center

This interview was conducted over two days at the Sakaharas' home.

Hank Shozo Umemoto Interview Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-294-17)
vh Hank Shozo Umemoto Interview Segment 17 (ddr-densho-1000-294-17)
Living conditions in camp: better than farm at home

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the ...

Sherman Kishi interview (ddr-csujad-6-13)
doc Sherman Kishi interview (ddr-csujad-6-13)
Oral history interview with Sherman Kishi. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_KISHI_SHERMAN
Takeharu Inouye Diary (ddr-densho-365-1)
doc Takeharu Inouye Diary (ddr-densho-365-1)
Takeharu Inouye's first diary documents his family's forced move to the Sacramento Assembly Center, followed by their move to the Tule Lake concentration camp. Since his mother, Miyoe Inouye, was a teacher, thirteen-year-old Takeharu's diary focuses on his classes in the Japanese and American schools at Tule Lake. His struggles with his schoolwork, as well as ...
Japanese Americans walking between barracks (ddr-densho-36-40)
img Japanese Americans walking between barracks (ddr-densho-36-40)
The Puyallup Assembly Center, also known as "Camp Harmony," was on the racetrack of the Puyallup fairgrounds. The center was open from April 28, 1942, through September 23, 1942. Most camp inmates were from Seattle, Washington. This is a view of the barracks that housed them.
Japanese Americans cooking (ddr-densho-36-34)
img Japanese Americans cooking (ddr-densho-36-34)
The assembly center was composed of blocks, each with its own kitchen and dining area.
Tule Lake Cooperator, Vol. 2 No. 36 (November 13, 1943) (ddr-densho-289-3)
doc Tule Lake Cooperator, Vol. 2 No. 36 (November 13, 1943) (ddr-densho-289-3)
Selected article titles: "Co-op Will Keep Cash For Colonists With Interest" (p. 1), "Editorial: Government" (p. 1), "Difficulty in Supplying Laundry Soap" (p. 1).
API