Economic losses

The economic and emotional toll associated with the uprooting of Japanese Americans from their homes and businesses was enormous. The cost was especially high for the issei (first-generation immigrants), who had worked most of their lives to establish financial security for themselves and their children. Many Japanese Americans bitterly recall being forced to sell property, personal belongings, and business equipment for a fraction of their value to opportunistic scavengers. Evacuees could take only what they could carry. They left behind heirlooms, cherished toys, and family pets. Farmers continued to work for a harvest they would never see, told it would be "disloyal" to stop. The bustling Nihonmachis (Japantowns) of the West Coast closed down and never fully recovered, even after the war ended.

Economic losses (231)

231 items
Shig Domoto (ddr-csujad-8-9)
doc Shig Domoto (ddr-csujad-8-9)
Oral history interview with Shig Domoto. Information on the oral history project is found in: csuf_stp_0012A; Glossary in: csuf_stp_0014. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: FCPL Domoto, Shig
An Oral History with John Yukio Mori (ddr-csujad-29-2)
av An Oral History with John Yukio Mori (ddr-csujad-29-2)
A Sansei and conscientious objector to the Vietnam war discusses alternate service as partner in Amerasia Bookstore, a nonprofit organization serving Los Angeles's Little Tokyo; activities in Young Buddhist Association; parent's reaction to his current life-style; and long term effect of World War II incarceration. This oral history was conducted for the Japanese Oral History Project ...
An Oral History with Craig Kei Ihara (ddr-csujad-29-1)
av An Oral History with Craig Kei Ihara (ddr-csujad-29-1)
Oral history with Craig Kei Ihara, Sansei and California State University, Fullerton philosophy professor, born at the Rohwer incarceration camp, Arkansas discusses family history, focusing on religion, education, aspirations, and cultural heritage; and recent overnight stay at old Rohwer campsite. This oral history was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project for the Center for ...
Letter to Teru Koyama from Dr. Keizaburo
doc Letter to Teru Koyama from Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama (ddr-one-5-4)
Letter dated January 27, 1942, to Teru Koyama from her husband, Kei Koyama. In the letter Kei writes about receiving the packages mailed to him and advises that the money he sent is to settle business matters in Portland related to his dental office, and asks her not to lease it Dr. S. but to Dr. ...
Fronts of two businesses owned by Japanese Americans forced to close after issuance of Executive Order 9066 (ddr-csujad-7-3)
img Fronts of two businesses owned by Japanese Americans forced to close after issuance of Executive Order 9066 (ddr-csujad-7-3)
Fronts of two businesses owned by Japanese Americans forced to close after issuance of Executive Order 9066. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: HMLSC_JA_f03
Perry Dobashi Interview Segment 10 (ddr-jamsj-2-3-10)
vh Perry Dobashi Interview Segment 10 (ddr-jamsj-2-3-10)
Financial impact of mass removal on family business

This interview was conducted by the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and is part of a project entitled "Lasting Stories: The Resettlement of San Jose Japantown," a collaborative project between the Japanese American Museum of San Jose and Densho.

API