Issei

The earliest wave of Japanese immigrants, the Issei (first generation), had a strong sense of their ethnic identity and retained the values and traditions of their country of birth. Most came to the United States as sojourners and planned to return to Japan after earning their fortunes. In addition, discriminatory laws forbade them from becoming American citizens and from exercising other basic rights, such as owning or leasing land. Since they were thus prevented from fully taking part in American life, it is not surprising that many still identified strongly with the culture of their homeland.

Issei (720)

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Issei

719 items
Japanese American men and women wear aprons/ uniforms (ddr-densho-362-6)
img Japanese American men and women wear aprons/ uniforms (ddr-densho-362-6)
Nineteen men and women wear aprons/ uniforms in a group photo. Those in the front row kneel while the rest stand. A building appears in the background.
Eight Japanese Americans (ddr-densho-362-17)
img Eight Japanese Americans (ddr-densho-362-17)
Eight individuals consisting of men, women, and a child gather for a group photo. A cabin appears in the background.
Large group picture in front of a camp building (ddr-densho-362-8)
img Large group picture in front of a camp building (ddr-densho-362-8)
A large group of men, women, and children pose together in front of a Heart Mountain building. Japanese text appears on the front of the photo.
Group photo of Japanese American family (ddr-densho-362-40)
img Group photo of Japanese American family (ddr-densho-362-40)
A family sitting on a building's ledge poses for a family picture. An open field and a mountain are in the background.
Two men, two women, and a girl with stuffed bunny (ddr-densho-362-56)
img Two men, two women, and a girl with stuffed bunny (ddr-densho-362-56)
Two men, two women and a little girl holding a stuffed bunny gather together for a group shot. Camp cabins are in the background.
Japanese American woman and three children sit on barracks steps (ddr-densho-362-11)
img Japanese American woman and three children sit on barracks steps (ddr-densho-362-11)
One woman and three children (two boys and one girl) sit together on barracks steps. Tom Konishi is seated in the front of the group.
Pacific Citizen, Vol. 110, No. 13 (April 6, 1990) (ddr-pc-62-13)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 110, No. 13 (April 6, 1990) (ddr-pc-62-13)
Select article titles: "U.S. Census Hears Asian Concerns"(p.1);"JACL Calls for Repeal of Discriminatory Employer Sanctions in Immigration Law"(p.1); "San Jose Japantown Seizes Unique Opportunity for Revitalization of Businesses & Community Life"(p.2); "Common Memorial to Restore Pioneer Issei History on Vancouver Island Planned for 1991"(p.3).
Envelope and letters to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letters to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-20)
White air mail envelope with a red, white and blue border. The envelope is addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama. The envelope is postmarked Jul 21, 1942, and in red pencil below the postmark is the date 7/25/42. On the left side of the envelope is a ...
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Lois Sato (ddr-one-5-32)
Postcard addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Camp Livingston from Lois Sato at Minidoka. Postmarked Sep 17, 1942. On the left side of the front of the postcard is a purple "Censored" stamp. On the back of the postcard is a handwritten message from Lois Sato. She writes about the weather at Minidoka and the eating ...
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-65)
One cent postcard addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Santa Fe Detention Station from his wife, Teru Koyama, at Minidoka. Postmarked Aug 16, 1943. To the left of the postmark “Aug-24-43” is written. "Examined" stamp in the lower left corner with "25-3" written on it. On the back dated Aug 15, 1943. Teru writes about the ...
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-6)
One cent postcard addressed to Dr. Kei Koyama at Fort Missoula from his wife, Teru Koyama, in Portland. The address on the front of the postcard is typed. Postmarked Feb 4, 1942. Censored stamp on the front, with an unknown signature in red pencil. Typed message on the back updates Kei about the children, her health ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-7)
Yellowed envelope addressed to Dr. Kei Koyama at Fort Missula with two postmarks from Portland; dated February 6, 1942. Handwritten is “Air Mail/SPECIAL DEL.” on the left side of the envelope; in red pencil “Feb 13” is written below. There are two purple stamps in the lower left corner: one is a "Fee" stamp from ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama and Eva Koyama (ddr-one-5-19)
Yellowed envelope addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama in Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama, in the Portland Assembly Center. The envelope is postmarked Jul 13, 1942. In red pencil “7/16-42” is written just below the postmark. On the left side of the envelope is a purple "CENSORED" stamp with unknown initials below the stamp ...
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-35)
Front of one cent postcard is addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama, at Minidoka. Postmarked Oct. 1942 over a six cent airmail stamp. On the left side of the front of the postcard is a purple "Censored" stamp. The message on the back of the postcard is dated Sept ...
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-29)
One cent postcard addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama, at Minidoka. The return sender information has both a mailing and telegram address listed. Postmarked Sep. 15, 1942. Below the postmark “9/20/42” is written in red pencil. On the left side of the postcard is a purple "Censored ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Andrew "Uncle Chape" Goodenough and Eva "Aunt Eva" Goodenough (ddr-one-5-25)
Envelope addressed to Dr. Kei Koyama in Camp Livingston from Andrew "Uncle Chape" Goodenough and Eva "Aunt Eva" Goodenough in Portland. Postmarked Aug 31, 1942. On the left side of the envelope is a purple "Censored" stamp. Inside the envelope was a newspaper clipping about Boy Scout Troop at the Portland Assembly Center. William Koyama's ...
Letter from Jokichi Yamanaka to Seiichi and Tomeyo Okine, November 1, 1951 [in Japanese] (ddr-csujad-5-268)
doc Letter from Jokichi Yamanaka to Seiichi and Tomeyo Okine, November 1, 1951 [in Japanese] (ddr-csujad-5-268)
A letter from Jokichi Yamanaka to his brother-in-law and sister-in-law, Seiichi and Tomeyo Okine. He informs that he has shipped a package containing prunes. He suggests they either eat them fresh or cooked. He includes a recipe for prune compote. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: oki_03_05_001
[Account book] (ddr-csujad-5-68)
doc [Account book] (ddr-csujad-5-68)
Pages from an account book which probably belongs to Seiichi Okine. Record of expenses and payees, including water fees, newspaper subscription, dog license, groceries, table rent fees at flower market, pumping, and others, between 1940 and 1941. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: oki_01_09_002
Letter from Teruko Fuji to Mr. and Mrs. Okine, April 9, 1947 [in Japanese] (ddr-csujad-5-202)
doc Letter from Teruko Fuji to Mr. and Mrs. Okine, April 9, 1947 [in Japanese] (ddr-csujad-5-202)
A letter from Teruko Fujii, a member of "S.P. Church" in Los Angeles, California, to Seiichi and Tomeyo Okine. Teruko informs them that the properties of the S.P. Church have been sold. She also invites the Okines to her church's prayers on the second Sunday. The arrival date of the letter, April 10 ...
[Seiichi Okine, chrysanthemum flowers] (ddr-csujad-5-42)
[Seiichi Okine, chrysanthemum flowers] (ddr-csujad-5-42)
A photograph of Japanese and Japanese Americans taken in the chrysanthemum flower field. Stamped on the backside: Kodacolor print made by Eastman Kodak Company, T.M. Regis. U.S. Pat. Off., week of Nov. 5, 1951. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: oki_01_05_027
Tei Bukkyokai [=Given by Bukkyokai] (ddr-csujad-5-230)
Tei Bukkyokai [=Given by Bukkyokai] (ddr-csujad-5-230)
A photograph of Bukkyokai members possibly taken at the Rhower incarceration camp, Arkansas. This photograph is given by the Bukkyokai to Seiichi Okine. The date, "August 15, 1944," is recorded on the backside. This item is enclosed in an envelope, which is found in item: csudh_oki_0223. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American ...
Letter from Jokichi Yamanaka to Mr. and Mrs. S. Okine, September 5, 1946 [in Japanese] (ddr-csujad-5-163)
doc Letter from Jokichi Yamanaka to Mr. and Mrs. S. Okine, September 5, 1946 [in Japanese] (ddr-csujad-5-163)
A letter from Jokichi Yamanaka in Hiroshima, Japan to his brother-in-law and sister-in-law, Seiichi and Tomeyo Okine. Jokichi writes about Masao Okine's visit to his place in Hiroshima, Japan and Masao's bringing the gifts from Seiichi and Tomeyo with him. He also writes of Masao's updates on issues in Hollister, California, where Jokichi ...
Letters from Seiichi Okine to Naraji Okine, Masao Okine, and Jokichi Yamanaka, September 1946 [in Japanese] (ddr-csujad-5-159)
doc Letters from Seiichi Okine to Naraji Okine, Masao Okine, and Jokichi Yamanaka, September 1946 [in Japanese] (ddr-csujad-5-159)
Contains one envelope and three letters written by Seiichi Okine addressing his son, Masao Okine, his brother Naoji Okine, and his brother-in-law, Jokichi Yamanaka, in Japan. Those three letters are enclosed in an envelope and mailed to Masao Okine who is stationed in Japan via San Francisco by the U.S. Postal Service, but the letter ...
[Okines' relatives, chrysanthemum flowers] (ddr-csujad-5-50)
img [Okines' relatives, chrysanthemum flowers] (ddr-csujad-5-50)
A color negative. Photographed are probably Okines' relatives, Jokichi Yamakana, standing in a greenhouse of chrysanthemum flowers. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: oki_01_06_004
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