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General stores

Industry and employment (329)
Small business (329)
General stores (50)

50 items
Mr. Jiro Omata and Mrs. Tsune Lee (ddr-csujad-8-59)
doc Mr. Jiro Omata and Mrs. Tsune Lee (ddr-csujad-8-59)
Oral history interview with Mr. Jiro Omata and Mrs. Tsune Lee. Information on the oral history project is found in: csuf_stp_0012A; Glossary in: csuf_stp_0014. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: FCPL Omata, Mr Jiro and Lee, Mrs Tsune
Akiko Matsui (ddr-csujad-8-37)
doc Akiko Matsui (ddr-csujad-8-37)
Oral history interview with Akiko Matsui. Information on the oral history project is found in: csuf_stp_0012A; Glossary in: csuf_stp_0014. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: FCPL Matsui, Akiko
Interior of Higo Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-16-25)
img Interior of Higo Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-16-25)
This photo shows the store's original light fixtures.
Interior of Higo Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-16-2)
img Interior of Higo Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-16-2)
The Higo Ten-Cent Store, located in Seattle's Nihonmachi (Japantown), was owned and operated by Sanzo and Matsuyo Murakami. Established in the early 1900s, the store sold a wide variety of American- and Japanese-made goods to serve the surrounding Issei and Nisei community.
Satoshi Kuwamoto interview (ddr-csujad-6-17)
doc Satoshi Kuwamoto interview (ddr-csujad-6-17)
Oral history interview with Satoshi Kuwamoto. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: SCRC_KUWAMOTO_SATOSHI
Tomiko Kuwamoto (ddr-csujad-8-35)
doc Tomiko Kuwamoto (ddr-csujad-8-35)
Oral history interview with Tomiko Kuwamoto. Information on the oral history project is found in: csuf_stp_0012A; Glossary in: csuf_stp_0014. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: FCPL Kuwamoto, Tomiko
Cooperatively owned canteen (ddr-csujad-26-130)
img Cooperatively owned canteen (ddr-csujad-26-130)
Photo of people working and shopping inside a canteen. Goods are seen divided by type. Verso reads "cooperatively owned canteen." From photo album of Robert Billigmeier. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: mei_05_100
Owner of Higo Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-16-6)
img Owner of Higo Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-16-6)
Kazuichi Kay Murakami stands inside his family's store.
Exterior of Higo Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-16-1)
img Exterior of Higo Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-16-1)
Sanzo and Matsuyo Murakami owned and operated the Higo Ten-Cent Store which was located on Weller Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi, or Japantown. The Higo Ten-Cent Store is currently called the Higo Variety Store and continues to be a landmark business in Seattle's International District which was known as Nihonmachi before World War II. The store is ...
Interior of Higo Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-16-3)
img Interior of Higo Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-16-3)
The Higo Ten-Cent Store, established in the early 1900s by Sanzo Murakami and his wife Matsuyo, is one of the last prewar Japanese American businesses in Seattle's International District, formerly known as Nihonmachi. The store sold a wide variety of American- and Japanese-made goods to the surrounding Issei and Nisei community.
Higo Ten-Cent Store business card (ddr-densho-16-24)
doc Higo Ten-Cent Store business card (ddr-densho-16-24)
This card shows the store's original address. Higo later moved from Weller to Jackson Street.
The Tazuma Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-24-13)
img The Tazuma Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-24-13)
Bunshiro and Sawano Tazuma owned the Tazuma Ten-Cent Store located at 12th Avenue and Jackson Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi, or Japantown. The store sold both American- and Japanese-made goods. Front: Yukio Tazuma. Back (left to right): Sawano and Bunshiro Tazuma.
Interior, the Tazuma Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-24-14)
img Interior, the Tazuma Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-24-14)
Sawano Tazuma (left) and Misao Tanaka inside the Tazuma Ten-Cent Store located at 12th Avenue and Jackson Street.
Tazuma Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-24-1)
img Tazuma Ten-Cent Store (ddr-densho-24-1)
The Tazuma Ten-Cent store was located at Twelfth and Jackson in Seattle, Washington.
Issei-owned store (ddr-densho-25-9)
img Issei-owned store (ddr-densho-25-9)
Matahichi and Kisa Iseri sold imported and dry goods from Japan as well as general merchandise to the Japanese American community in the White River Valley. When they started the business, the Iseris used their garage, as seen here. Later, they built a bigger store in front of their property.
The Leonard Store (ddr-densho-25-10)
img The Leonard Store (ddr-densho-25-10)
The Leonard Store was an important business in the White River Valley. Leonard introduced modern conveniences such as post office boxes and phones to the community. He also catered to the local Nikkei and imported various goods from Japan. Matahichi Iseri, a prominent Issei, worked for Leonard who promised to make him a partner in the ...
Bainbridge Gardens (ddr-densho-34-12)
img Bainbridge Gardens (ddr-densho-34-12)
Bainbridge Gardens consisted of a grocery store, nursery, and gas station.
Takayoshi general store and delivery wagon (ddr-densho-34-158)
img Takayoshi general store and delivery wagon (ddr-densho-34-158)
This general store was located in Yama, the Japanese village in Port Blakely, Washington. The store served the Japanese village by providing general merchandise, Japanese goods brought over from Seattle, fresh homemade ice cream, and the only telephone in the village. The store's owner put a piano in the store after it became a community gathering ...
Bainbridge Gardens grocery store (ddr-densho-34-13)
img Bainbridge Gardens grocery store (ddr-densho-34-13)
Bainbridge Gardens had a store, gas station, and a nursery to serve the Japanese American community.
Grocery store at Bainbridge Gardens (ddr-densho-34-11)
img Grocery store at Bainbridge Gardens (ddr-densho-34-11)
Bainbridge Gardens consisted of a general store, nursery, and gas station. Left to right: store clerks Yaeko Yamashita and May Yamaguchi with owners Zenmatsu Seko and Zenkichi Harui.
Bainbridge Gardens (ddr-densho-34-1)
img Bainbridge Gardens (ddr-densho-34-1)
Bainbridge Gardens was located on Fletcher Bay and had a nursery, general store and gas station. Left to right: Yaeko Yamashita, unidentified man, and Fujiko Koba.
Bainbridge Gardens (ddr-densho-34-17)
img Bainbridge Gardens (ddr-densho-34-17)
Bainbridge Gardens consisted of a nursery, grocery store and a gas station.
Bainbridge Gardens (ddr-densho-34-10)
img Bainbridge Gardens (ddr-densho-34-10)
Bainbridge Gardens was located on Miller Bay Road. The business included a nursery, gas station and grocery store.
Two women in Japanese garden (ddr-densho-34-16)
img Two women in Japanese garden (ddr-densho-34-16)
Yaeko Yamashita and Fujiko Koba in the Japanese garden at Bainbridge Gardens.
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