Small business

Japanese American businesses, such as groceries, fish shops, laundries, barbershops, public bathhouses, restaurants, drugstores, and dry goods stores, sprang up in communities along the West Coast. Women and children were vitally important to these "mom and pop" enterprises, as their free labor allowed the family to survive and even prosper during lean times.

Small business (325)

325 items
Three Issei men and child outside the Mitsuwado store (ddr-densho-13-2)
img Three Issei men and child outside the Mitsuwado store (ddr-densho-13-2)
Mitsuwado was located at 522 Main Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi, or Japantown. The store sold a variety of items including books, records, record players, and fishing tackle. Left to right: Kinzo Asaba (the store's owner), Mr. Osawa, unidentified, and unidentified.
Issei-run store (ddr-densho-25-11)
img Issei-run store (ddr-densho-25-11)
Matahichi and Kisa Iseri ran a small store and berry farm in Thomas, Washington. Matahichi first opened the store in the family's garage shown here.
Meat market (ddr-densho-34-61)
img Meat market (ddr-densho-34-61)
Mrs. Tom Omura (second from left) and Mr. Tom Omura, holding one-year-old Masaaki (John) Nakata, in front of the meat market and restaurant along Winslow Way East on Bainbridge Island, Washington. The identity of the person on the left is unknown.
Bainbridge Gardens gas station (ddr-densho-34-23)
img Bainbridge Gardens gas station (ddr-densho-34-23)
A view of Bainbridge Gardens from Miller Bay Road with Mo Nakata's Pontiac out front.
Aiko photo studio (ddr-densho-35-295)
img Aiko photo studio (ddr-densho-35-295)
Aiko photo studio was located on the second floor of this building on Sixth and Jackson in Seattle.
Cherry Land Florist (ddr-densho-38-30)
img Cherry Land Florist (ddr-densho-38-30)
The Cherry Land Florist was located on Jackson Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi, or Japantown.
Market (ddr-densho-109-60)
img Market (ddr-densho-109-60)
West Side Market at Twenty-sixth and Proctor in Tacoma, Washington.
Issei man in his store (ddr-densho-124-17)
img Issei man in his store (ddr-densho-124-17)
This store was located on Second Avenue in Seattle.
Dye works storefront (ddr-densho-130-3)
img Dye works storefront (ddr-densho-130-3)
About 15 families in North Seattle owned dye works (dry cleaning) businesses. This shop, the M & M Dye Works, was located at North 42nd and Fremont Avenue.
Siblings in front of house (ddr-densho-136-31)
img Siblings in front of house (ddr-densho-136-31)
Frank and Violet Yokoyama, along with their parents, operated a produce store and greenhouse in North Seattle, and sold their produce at a vegetable stand in the Pike Place Market.
Perry Dobashi Interview Segment 17 (ddr-jamsj-2-3-17)
vh Perry Dobashi Interview Segment 17 (ddr-jamsj-2-3-17)
Typical working conditions at Dobashi Market: hundred-pound rice sacks

This interview was conducted by the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and is part of a project entitled "Lasting Stories: The Resettlement of San Jose Japantown," a collaborative project between the Japanese American Museum of San Jose and Densho.

Perry Dobashi Interview Segment 15 (ddr-jamsj-2-3-15)
vh Perry Dobashi Interview Segment 15 (ddr-jamsj-2-3-15)
Getting involved in the family business postwar

This interview was conducted by the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and is part of a project entitled "Lasting Stories: The Resettlement of San Jose Japantown," a collaborative project between the Japanese American Museum of San Jose and Densho.

Kenji Maruko Interview Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1010-8-2)
vh Kenji Maruko Interview Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1010-8-2)
Father's prewar bicycle shop

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

Mollie Nakasaki Interview Segment 3 (ddr-jamsj-2-4-3)
vh Mollie Nakasaki Interview Segment 3 (ddr-jamsj-2-4-3)
Family's grocery store in Salinas's Little Japantown

This interview was conducted by the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and is part of a project entitled "Lasting Stories: The Resettlement of San Jose Japantown," a collaborative project between the Japanese American Museum of San Jose and Densho.

Richard Onishi Interview Segment 4 (ddr-jamsj-2-2-4)
vh Richard Onishi Interview Segment 4 (ddr-jamsj-2-2-4)
Father's work in the nursery business

This interview was conducted by the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and is part of a project entitled "Lasting Stories: The Resettlement of San Jose Japantown," a collaborative project between the Japanese American Museum of San Jose and Densho.

Kay Matsuoka Segment 8 (ddr-densho-1000-48-8)
vh Kay Matsuoka Segment 8 (ddr-densho-1000-48-8)
Choosing a career, "have a trade in your hand"; getting started in dress design, apprenticing and opening own shop
Kay Matsuoka Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-48-11)
vh Kay Matsuoka Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-48-11)
Getting started in dress design, apprenticing and opening own shop: description of clientele
Frank S. Fujii Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-8-3)
vh Frank S. Fujii Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-8-3)
Helping to run the family-owned business, Fujii's Tavern

This interview was conducted over two days due to electrical problems. The majority of the interview was completed on the second day, September 5.

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