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Preparation

On March 2, 1942, Public Proclamation No. 1 began to appear on telephone poles and buildings. This was the first official notice Japanese Americans had of their immediate removal from the West Coast. The notices stated that they had six or seven days to prepare, and were to take only what they could carry. They were not told where they would be taken. People rushed to sell or store, in one week, property and belongings acquired over a lifetime. Some families tucked their valuables away in their attic or basement and locked the door, hoping to return soon.

World War II (54)
Mass removal ("evacuation") (151)
Preparation (281)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Military Areas 1 and 2

281 items
Fronts of two businesses owned by Japanese Americans forced to close after issuance of Executive Order 9066 (ddr-csujad-7-3)
img Fronts of two businesses owned by Japanese Americans forced to close after issuance of Executive Order 9066 (ddr-csujad-7-3)
Fronts of two businesses owned by Japanese Americans forced to close after issuance of Executive Order 9066. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: HMLSC_JA_f03
An Oral History with Norman Y. Mineta (ddr-csujad-29-55)
vh An Oral History with Norman Y. Mineta (ddr-csujad-29-55)
Japanese American congressman, representing the Thirteenth Congressional District of California, born and raised in San Jose, California, discusses his early life, graduation from the University of California, Berkeley, and receiving a commission and serving in the armed forces from 1953-1956. Recalls the removal, "relocation," and incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II at the Heart ...
Signs announcing
img Signs announcing "evacuation" sale (ddr-csujad-7-4)
Signs announcing "evacuation" sale. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: HMLSC_JA_f04
Japanese Evacuation-Policy and Perspectives (ddr-csujad-19-55)
doc Japanese Evacuation-Policy and Perspectives (ddr-csujad-19-55)
This is an article from the magazine "Common Ground," summer 1942, by Carey McWilliams which discusses the policy for the "evacuation and resettlement" of virtually the entire Japanese population on the West Coast. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: WRA_02-11-01
Mid-Columbia Bulletin Vol. VI (ddr-one-3-8)
doc Mid-Columbia Bulletin Vol. VI (ddr-one-3-8)
Mid-Columbia Bulletin newsletter. Vol. VI, April 22, 1942. Written by the J.A.C.L. (Japanese American Citizens League). Covers preparations for the incarceration of the Japanese American community, including packing, property sales, personal documents (e.g. wills, letters of recommendations, etc.), financial concerns, and other information regarding the evacuation order. Includes a description about what life at the Assembly ...
Letter to George Kida from Major E.A. Steuding (ddr-one-3-16)
doc Letter to George Kida from Major E.A. Steuding (ddr-one-3-16)
Letter and envelope to George Kida from Major E. A. Steuding, the acting Provost Marshal for the State of the Oregon, informing George that his request for more information about the date of evacuation and the possibility of re-settlement in his letter written on May 19, 1942 could not be could not be answered by the ...
Mid-Columbia Bulletin Vol. VII (ddr-one-3-9)
doc Mid-Columbia Bulletin Vol. VII (ddr-one-3-9)
Mid-Columbia Bulletin newsletter. Vol. VII, April 30, 1942. First page in English, gives information about what the Assembly Centers are like and what items may be brought to the Center. Mentions the sale of rice and a typhoid inoculation clinic. The remaining 5 pages are in Japanese.
Letter to George Kida from John McEwen (ddr-one-3-15)
doc Letter to George Kida from John McEwen (ddr-one-3-15)
Letter and envelope addressed to George Kida from John McEwen, a lawyer with McEwen & Brooks law firm located in Goldendale, Washington. He sent George his deed from Mr. James Albert (Al) Johnson and George's will.
Letter to Teru Koyama from Dr. Keizaburo
doc Letter to Teru Koyama from Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama (ddr-one-5-4)
Letter dated January 27, 1942, to Teru Koyama from her husband, Kei Koyama. In the letter Kei writes about receiving the packages mailed to him and advises that the money he sent is to settle business matters in Portland related to his dental office, and asks her not to lease it Dr. S. but to Dr. ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-10)
Envelope addressed to Dr. Kei Koyama at Fort Missula from his wife, Teru Koyama, in Portland. Postmarked March 24, 1942. In the lower left corner is a "CENSORED" stamp. The enclosed letter, dated March 23, 1942, has the same stamp at the top of the page. Teru writes about receiving his last letter, which made everyone ...
Registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-34-164)
img Registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-34-164)
Surrounded by U.S. army soldiers, Nisei men register their families during the exclusion from Bainbridge Island, Washington.
Japanese Americans registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-36-49)
img Japanese Americans registering for mass removal (ddr-densho-36-49)
These Japanese are being processed in preparation for exclusion from Seattle, Washington. The processing took place at a civil control station located at 2100 2nd Avenue. Original Seattle Post Intelligencer caption: "Waiting their turn--Members of Seattle's Japanese community in the course of being processed at the civil control station at 2100 2nd Ave. in preparation for ...
Nihonmachi during mass removal (ddr-densho-36-12)
img Nihonmachi during mass removal (ddr-densho-36-12)
This is a window front in Seattle's Nihonmachi during the mass removal. Once the incarceration became inevitable, "evacuation" sales were commonplace. Japanese Americans, unsure of the future and knowing they could take into the camps only what they could carry, were forced to sell their real and personal property in one week. Many buyers, knowing the ...
Mass removal processing center (ddr-densho-36-13)
img Mass removal processing center (ddr-densho-36-13)
Original caption from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer: Novel audience--Scene in the old theater at 1319 Rainier Ave. which has been converted into a civil control station for evacuation of Japanese from Seattle this week. The Japanese passed from table to table and when the "show" was over they were ready for their trip to the assembly center ...
JACL mass removal registration (ddr-densho-36-30)
img JACL mass removal registration (ddr-densho-36-30)
The Seattle chapter of the JACL conducted emergency "evacuation" registration on or about March 14, 1942.
JACL mass removal registration (ddr-densho-36-29)
img JACL mass removal registration (ddr-densho-36-29)
The Seattle chapter of the JACL conducted emergency "evacuation" registration on or about March 14, 1942.
Packing items for the mass removal (ddr-densho-36-50)
img Packing items for the mass removal (ddr-densho-36-50)
This mother and daughter pack their belongings in preparation for mass removal.
Closed Japanese American store (ddr-densho-37-444)
img Closed Japanese American store (ddr-densho-37-444)
Original WRA caption: Los Angeles, California. Mr. and Mrs. K. Tseri closed their drugstore in preparation for the forthcoming evacuation from their "Little Tokyo" in Los Angeles.
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