Fishing and canneries

Japanese Americans found work at salmon canneries along the Columbia River in Oregon and Washington, and their labor was welcomed in Alaskan towns such as Ketchikan and Petersburg as early as the 1890s. They traveled by ship to the cannery towns, where they slowly developed small communities whose population swelled with the yearly arrival of workers. Issei (Japanese immigrant) entrepreneurs started the oyster industry from scratch in Puget Sound. Japanese American oyster farms became thriving businesses before World War II.

Fishing and canneries (169)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Takahashi v. Fish and Game Commission

169 items
Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-145-16)
vh Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-145-16)
Organization of the Waterfall Cannery; discussion of the roles of various ethnic groups

This interview focuses on the narrator's experiences working in the Alaska salmon cannery system in the 1930s.

Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 22 (ddr-densho-1000-145-22)
vh Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 22 (ddr-densho-1000-145-22)
Acting as a middleman between the management and the workers at the Waterfall cannery

This interview focuses on the narrator's experiences working in the Alaska salmon cannery system in the 1930s.

Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-145-11)
vh Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-145-11)
Description of other roles within the cannery personnel: contractor, foreman and cook

This interview focuses on the narrator's experiences working in the Alaska salmon cannery system in the 1930s.

Richard Murakami Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-64-7)
vh Richard Murakami Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-64-7)
Growing up in a station house on pilings, family's Oyster Packing Co.
Unloading oysters from a bateau (ddr-densho-15-105)
img Unloading oysters from a bateau (ddr-densho-15-105)
These two farmers are unloading oysters from a bateau for processing. Left to right: Chuck (last name unknown) and Jack Tanabe.
Scow (ddr-densho-15-119)
img Scow (ddr-densho-15-119)
The scow was used to gather oysters. A winch-operated dredge was dragged across the oyster beds at high tide, and the harvested oysters were then emptied onto the scow or a bateau. In order to deliver the oysters to the processing plant, both the scow and the bateau had to be towed.
Unloading oysters from a bateau (ddr-densho-15-107)
img Unloading oysters from a bateau (ddr-densho-15-107)
These workers are unloading oysters from a bateau at the processing area. The oysters were shoveled into a hopper and onto a conveyor belt that led into the processing area, where they were opened.
Men playing go (ddr-densho-15-26)
img Men playing go (ddr-densho-15-26)
These Japanese Americans are seen traveling to Alaska to work in the canneries. The man on the left facing the camera is Mr. Abe.
Marking an oyster bed (ddr-densho-15-111)
img Marking an oyster bed (ddr-densho-15-111)
Emil Nakao marking an oyster bed. The bed was marked with long poles at low tide, allowing farmers to gather the oysters with tongs at high tide.
Salmon cannery (ddr-densho-15-88)
img Salmon cannery (ddr-densho-15-88)
Mike Petrakov unloads salmon onto a conveyor belt for processing. Many Japanese Americans also worked for this same cannery.
Willa Point Oyster Company (ddr-densho-15-113)
img Willa Point Oyster Company (ddr-densho-15-113)
The Willa Point Oyster Company canned local oysters for shipping.
Three oyster farmers (ddr-densho-39-49)
img Three oyster farmers (ddr-densho-39-49)
Japanese Americans were active in oyster farming in the Puget Sound area before World War II.
New Washington Oyster company truck (ddr-densho-39-23)
img New Washington Oyster company truck (ddr-densho-39-23)
Original museum description: Photograph, black and white glossy of a building of an oyster farm complex and a truck backed into the doorway of the building. The truck's sign says "New Washington Brand Oysters." The photo has a smudge mark on the building's roof and is turning brown. This might be at Willapa Bay ...
The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 72 (October 3, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-59)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 72 (October 3, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-59)
"Local 7 Rejects Ousted Officials" (p. 1), Postscript to World War II: Nation's War Dead to Return Oct. 10" (p. 1), "Court Returns Greenhouses to Japanese" (p. 1).
The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 39 (June 6, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-27)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 39 (June 6, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-27)
"Many Alaska Salmon Industry Workers Sought" (p. 1), "Report Cites B.C. Removal of Japanese" (p. 1), "Okada and Satow Will Speak Here Monday Night in Buddhist Church; Report on Claims Board Bill" (p. 1).
The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 19 (March 14, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-6)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 19 (March 14, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-6)
"Alaska Cannery Contract Talks Start" (p. 1), "House Unit Halts Bills Preventing Alien Deportation" (p. 1), "Army Seeks More Nisei GI's to Aid Occupation of Japan" (p. 1), "Republican Majority Votes to Kill State FEPC Bill" (p. 2).
The Northwest Times Vol. 2 No. 33 (April 14, 1948) (ddr-densho-229-101)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 2 No. 33 (April 14, 1948) (ddr-densho-229-101)
"Pacific Northwest Trade Helps Orient Recovery, NWA Aide Says" (p. 1), "House Will Hear Legislations on Naturalization April 19" (p. 1), "Orders Halt on Hearing Against CIO" (p. 1), "JACL to File Brief with Top Court to Back Takahashi in Fish Case" (p. 2).
The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 74 (October 10, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-61)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 74 (October 10, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-61)
"Nisei War Dead on Second Shipment of State Servicemen Killed in Action" (p. 1), "New Local 7 Cannery Union Officers Will be Installed on Nov. 1" (p. 1), "JCCC Promises Legal Experts for Japanese" (p. 4).
The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 21 (March 21, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-8)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 1 No. 21 (March 21, 1947) (ddr-densho-229-8)
"Unions Reject Alaska Industrial Offer" (p. 1), "B.C. Students Ask Citizenship for Japanese, Indians" (p. 1), "Yoshida Urges U.S. to Stay in Japan to Insure Peace" (p. 1)
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