Fishing and canneries

Japanese Americans found work at salmon canneries along the Columbia River in Oregon and Washington, and their labor was welcomed in Alaskan towns such as Ketchikan and Petersburg as early as the 1890s. They traveled by ship to the cannery towns, where they slowly developed small communities whose population swelled with the yearly arrival of workers. Issei (Japanese immigrant) entrepreneurs started the oyster industry from scratch in Puget Sound. Japanese American oyster farms became thriving businesses before World War II.

Fishing and canneries (169)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Takahashi v. Fish and Game Commission

169 items
Fishing boats hauling in the day's catch (ddr-densho-299-11)
img Fishing boats hauling in the day's catch (ddr-densho-299-11)
Caption on reverse: "FEC-49-1021. 8 Feb 49 / NRS Project: / Japanese fishermen haul in nets / off the coast of Odawara, Japan, / as the small boats are drawn to the / master ship, which is powered by / a deisel [sic] engine. When all boats / are together, the nets are emptied / and the day's catch loaded on the / master ...
The Northwest Times Vol. 3 No. 42 (May 25, 1949) (ddr-densho-229-209)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 3 No. 42 (May 25, 1949) (ddr-densho-229-209)
"NLRB Turns Down Petition by Two AFL Unions for Vote Among Alaska Cannery Men" (p. 1), "Honors to GI Dead and Dedication of Monument Set" (p. 1).
The Northwest Times Vol. 2 No. 28 (March 27, 1948) (ddr-densho-229-98)
doc The Northwest Times Vol. 2 No. 28 (March 27, 1948) (ddr-densho-229-98)
"Nisei War Memorial Committee Awaits Fund Report from Tacoma; $9,053.65 Total as of March 25" (p. 1), "Two Nisei GI's Die in Crash of C-47 Plane" (p. 1), "Cannery Leaders Begin Talks" (p. 1),
Jimmie Omura Interview Segment 9 (ddr-densho-1002-11-9)
vh Jimmie Omura Interview Segment 9 (ddr-densho-1002-11-9)
Memories of working in an Alaska salmon cannery as a teenager

This interview was conducted by sisters Emiko and Chizuko Omori for their 1999 documentary, Rabbit in the Moon, about the Japanese American resisters of conscience in the World War II incarceration camps. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories ...

Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 31 (ddr-densho-1000-145-31)
vh Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 31 (ddr-densho-1000-145-31)
Other memories of the Waterfall cannery: poor living conditions; layout of the cannery

This interview focuses on the narrator's experiences working in the Alaska salmon cannery system in the 1930s.

Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 35 (ddr-densho-1000-145-35)
vh Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 35 (ddr-densho-1000-145-35)
Dangerous health conditions in the canneries

This interview focuses on the narrator's experiences working in the Alaska salmon cannery system in the 1930s.

Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-145-3)
vh Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-145-3)
History and organization of the Alaska canneries

This interview focuses on the narrator's experiences working in the Alaska salmon cannery system in the 1930s.

Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 5 (ddr-densho-1000-145-5)
vh Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 5 (ddr-densho-1000-145-5)
Isseis' roles as contractors in the canneries

This interview focuses on the narrator's experiences working in the Alaska salmon cannery system in the 1930s.

Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 32 (ddr-densho-1000-145-32)
vh Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 32 (ddr-densho-1000-145-32)
Description of the physical layout of the Waterfall cannery, separate lodging for different ethnic groups

This interview focuses on the narrator's experiences working in the Alaska salmon cannery system in the 1930s.

Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-145-6)
vh Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-145-6)
Overview of the general operation of an Alaskan cannery; description of four different types of salmon

This interview focuses on the narrator's experiences working in the Alaska salmon cannery system in the 1930s.

Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 9 (ddr-densho-1000-145-9)
vh Frank Miyamoto Interview IV Segment 9 (ddr-densho-1000-145-9)
Organization and hierarchy of the cannery personnel

This interview focuses on the narrator's experiences working in the Alaska salmon cannery system in the 1930s.

Mako Nakagawa Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1000-66-1)
vh Mako Nakagawa Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1000-66-1)
Father's background: eking out a living in an Alaskan cannery
Toshio Moritsugu Interview Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-318-3)
vh Toshio Moritsugu Interview Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-318-3)
Growing up in Hawaiian fishing village called Fish Camp

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of ...

Oyster farmer (ddr-densho-15-115)
img Oyster farmer (ddr-densho-15-115)
Mr. Mukai steering oysters into a box, where they were steamed open for canning.
Oyster processing machine (?) (ddr-densho-15-31)
img Oyster processing machine (?) (ddr-densho-15-31)
This photo was taken at the Yamashita oyster farm. The machine might have been used to process oyster shells.
Oyster farmer (ddr-densho-15-100)
img Oyster farmer (ddr-densho-15-100)
Norio Mitsuoka is farming oysters. Two long tongs allowed farmers to harvest oysters before the tide was completely out. Each tong had a "rake" at the end, and the farmers would scoop the oysters together between the rakes and haul them up. When full, the load weighed approximately 20 to 30 pounds. Oyster harvesters were paid ...
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