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38 items
Instructions to an Issei man regarding the burial of his son (ddr-densho-25-62)
doc Instructions to an Issei man regarding the burial of his son (ddr-densho-25-62)
Mitsuo (Mike) Iseri, son of Matahichi and Kisa Iseri, was killed in action during the war. Matahichi Iseri was instructed to fill out a form entitled "Application for Final Disposition of Remains."
Letter regarding parole termination (ddr-densho-25-117)
doc Letter regarding parole termination (ddr-densho-25-117)
This letter from a Department of Justice officer to Matahichi Iseri informed him that as of November 15, 1945, his parole status as an enemy alien had been terminated.
Family photograph (ddr-densho-25-89)
img Family photograph (ddr-densho-25-89)
The Iseri family. Front (left to right): Mae, Matahichi, George, Kisa with Dan on lap, Alice, and Masato. Back row: Mitsuo (Mike) Tom and Mun.
Funeral service for a Nisei soldier (ddr-densho-25-64)
img Funeral service for a Nisei soldier (ddr-densho-25-64)
Mitsuo (Mike) Iseri, son of Matahichi and Kisa Iseri, was killed in action during World War II. He was later buried in Seattle, Washington.
Letter regarding parole appointment (ddr-densho-25-56)
doc Letter regarding parole appointment (ddr-densho-25-56)
This letter to Matahichi Iseri informed him of his appointment to meet with his parole officer.
Letter written by an Issei man (ddr-densho-25-70)
doc Letter written by an Issei man (ddr-densho-25-70)
Matahichi Iseri had been imprisoned in Fort Missoula, Montana, a Department of Justice internment camp for "enemy aliens," since shortly after December 7, 1941. He sometimes wrote letters in his native Japanese, which were read and censored by interpreters and officials from the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
White River Valley sumo club (ddr-densho-25-6)
img White River Valley sumo club (ddr-densho-25-6)
Sumo wrestling was a popular sport among the Issei and Nisei. This team from the White River Valley was in Tacoma for a tournament. Front row (left to right): Sam Katsura, Tom Marutani, Tom Hirai, Tony Tsujikawa, D. Kagitani, Frank Takeshita, George Hirai, Mitsuo (Mike) Iseri, unidentified, Ted Takeshita, and Ted Tsukamaki. Back row: Matahichi Iseri, …
Letter regarding travel permit (ddr-densho-25-108)
doc Letter regarding travel permit (ddr-densho-25-108)
In 1945, Matahichi Iseri applied for a travel permit to visit friends at the Minidoka concentration camp in Idaho. His permit was denied, since his reason for wanting to visit did not fit into any of the permit categories.
Burial of a Nisei soldier (ddr-densho-25-63)
img Burial of a Nisei soldier (ddr-densho-25-63)
Mitsuo (Mike) Iseri, son of Matahichi and Kisa Iseri, was killed in action during World War II.
Issei-owned store (ddr-densho-25-9)
img Issei-owned store (ddr-densho-25-9)
Matahichi and Kisa Iseri sold imported and dry goods from Japan as well as general merchandise to the Japanese American community in the White River Valley. When they started the business, the Iseris used their garage, as seen here. Later, they built a bigger store in front of their property.
Seasonal Work Leave permit for an Issei (ddr-densho-25-40)
doc Seasonal Work Leave permit for an Issei (ddr-densho-25-40)
Matahichi Iseri and his family participated in the Seasonal Work Leave Program, and were thus issued permits to become temporary laborers on a farm in Weiser, Idaho. This memo to Matahichi Iseri from the Tule Lake Leave Office detailed instructions for Matahichi's departure from Tule Lake to Weiser.
doc "Disposition of World War II Armed Forces Dead" pamphlet (ddr-densho-25-119)
This pamphlet was sent to Matahichi Iseri following the death of his son, Private Mitsuo (Mike) Iseri, during World War II.
Packaging berries (ddr-densho-25-2)
img Packaging berries (ddr-densho-25-2)
Matahichi and Kisa Iseri leased a farm in Sumner and grew raspberries for various canneries. The wooden berry "cups" were handmade locally. Left to right: Matahichi Iseri carrying oldest son Tom, Kisa Iseri, and their nephew, Tsukasa Iseri.
List of regulations specifying conduct to be observed by
doc List of regulations specifying conduct to be observed by "alien enemies" (ddr-densho-25-20)
Matahichi Iseri, considered a "dangerous enemy alien," was arrested on Dec. 7, 1941, and imprisoned in the Department of Justice internment camp at Fort Missoula, Montana. During the war, enemy aliens were not allowed to own contraband articles such as weapons, signal devices, and cameras. They were required to carry certificates of identification at all times, …
Opening celebration, White River judo dojo (ddr-densho-25-7)
img Opening celebration, White River judo dojo (ddr-densho-25-7)
Matahichi Iseri and his wife, Kisa, were very supportive of youth activities, and in 1927 they converted part of their warehouse into a judo dojo. This dinner was held to celebrate the opening of the dojo.
Issei man's letter envelopes (ddr-densho-25-84)
doc Issei man's letter envelopes (ddr-densho-25-84)
These envelopes contained letters written by Matahichi Iseri to his family while he was imprisoned in Fort Missoula, Montana, a Department of Justice internment camp for "enemy aliens."
Alien's leave permit (ddr-densho-25-34)
doc Alien's leave permit (ddr-densho-25-34)
In April 1943, Matahichi Iseri and his family were granted permits to leave the Tule Lake concentration camp to go to Weiser, Idaho, as part of the seasonal work leave program. Because he was an Issei, Matahichi Iseri had to apply for a special permit.
The Leonard Store (ddr-densho-25-10)
img The Leonard Store (ddr-densho-25-10)
The Leonard Store was an important business in the White River Valley. Leonard introduced modern conveniences such as post office boxes and phones to the community. He also catered to the local Nikkei and imported various goods from Japan. Matahichi Iseri, a prominent Issei, worked for Leonard who promised to make him a partner in the …
Evacuation claims settlement sheet (ddr-densho-25-65)
doc Evacuation claims settlement sheet (ddr-densho-25-65)
Under the Japanese American Evacuation Claims Act, Matahichi Iseri claimed $246 in damages from losses due to World War II. In 1952, the Justice Department awarded him a compromise settlement of $226. He was fortunate to receive an amount so close to his original claim, since many Japanese Americans received much less.
Letter from Friends of the American Way (ddr-densho-25-61)
doc Letter from Friends of the American Way (ddr-densho-25-61)
In this letter, the Friends of the American Way, an activist group sympathetic to Japanese Americans, expressed its condolences to Matahichi and Kisa Iseri following the death of their son, Mitsuo (Mike) Iseri, who had served in the military.
Letter written by an Issei man to his family (ddr-densho-25-68)
doc Letter written by an Issei man to his family (ddr-densho-25-68)
Matahichi Iseri was arrested on December 7, 1941, and taken to Fort Missoula, Montana, where he was detained at a Department of Justice internment camp for "enemy aliens." While he was separated from his wife and children, he was able to send a limited number of letters to them.
Deportation tag (ddr-densho-25-32)
doc Deportation tag (ddr-densho-25-32)
Matahichi Iseri received this deportation tag when he was sent to Fort Missoula, Montana, a Department of Justice internment camp for enemy aliens.
Agreement to lease land (ddr-densho-25-92)
doc Agreement to lease land (ddr-densho-25-92)
This agreement to lease land was signed by A. J. Charleston and Matahichi Iseri. In the early 1900s, many states, led by California, enacted alien land laws. These laws aimed at Issei farmers prevented ownership of land by "aliens ineligible for citizenship." As a result, many Issei leased land from white farmers. In 1920, California enacted …
Mochitsuki (ddr-densho-25-136)
img Mochitsuki (ddr-densho-25-136)
Matahichi Iseri (far right) and Mrs. Fujinaga (back to camera) were originally from the White River Valley in Washington. After their wartime incarceration, they resettled in Ontario, Oregon, with their families. They and friends are following the New Year's tradition of mochitsuki, making rice cakes. Clockwise from the left: Mr. Kanetomi, unidentified, Mrs. Morimoto, Mrs. Kanetomi, …
Parolee report (ddr-densho-25-116)
doc Parolee report (ddr-densho-25-116)
In 1945, Matahichi Iseri lived in Ontario, Oregon, and reported to the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
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