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10 items
War Department Notification of Personnel Action (ddr-densho-365-5)
doc War Department Notification of Personnel Action (ddr-densho-365-5)
This Notification of Personnel Action from the War Department granted Takeharu Inouye a temporary appointment as a warehouse laborer in Ogden, Utah. Takeharu hoped to find work when he moved with his family to Utah after their internment in Tule Lake during WWII.
Civil Service Commission Notice of Rating (ddr-densho-365-4)
doc Civil Service Commission Notice of Rating (ddr-densho-365-4)
Takeharu Inouye received this Notice of Rating from the United States Civil Service Commission, indicating that he was deemed eligible in his application for a position as a laborer. This was not an appointment to a position, merely a calculated rating of his writing skills and education. Takeharu hoped to find work when he moved with …
Takeharu Inouye Diary (ddr-densho-365-2)
doc Takeharu Inouye Diary (ddr-densho-365-2)
In the second diary he kept in the camp at Tule Lake, Takeharu Inouye recounts his struggles with education and the boredom resulting from few recreational opportunities. Though he participated in several baseball games with his classmates, Takeharu spent the majority of his free time attending the movie showings that occurred daily or weekly throughout the …
W.R.A. Tule Lake Project nametag (ddr-densho-365-18)
doc W.R.A. Tule Lake Project nametag (ddr-densho-365-18)
Takeharu Inouye's nametag and number badge for work as a farm laborer at the Tule Lake concentration camp. Inouye worked in farm operations, primarily on a mechanical harvester, until the injuries and deaths of several laborers led to the strikes at Tule Lake, and the termination of their employment.
Takeharu Inouye obituary (ddr-densho-365-17)
doc Takeharu Inouye obituary (ddr-densho-365-17)
Takeharu Inouye's obituary in an Idaho newspaper. Inouye passed away in Glenn's Ferry, Idaho, where he had worked as a ranch hand until his retirement. After his release from Tule Lake, Inouye stayed close with his family, moving with them and primarily working in warehouses and on farms in Utah and Idaho.
Takeharu Inouye Diary (ddr-densho-365-1)
doc Takeharu Inouye Diary (ddr-densho-365-1)
Takeharu Inouye's first diary documents his family's forced move to the Sacramento Assembly Center, followed by their move to the Tule Lake concentration camp. Since his mother, Miyoe Inouye, was a teacher, thirteen-year-old Takeharu's diary focuses on his classes in the Japanese and American schools at Tule Lake. His struggles with his schoolwork, as well as …
Takeharu Inouye Diary (ddr-densho-365-3)
doc Takeharu Inouye Diary (ddr-densho-365-3)
In the final diary that Takeharu Inouye kept during his internment at Tule Lake, he includes descriptions of the movies he went to see daily, which served as his primary form of recreation. Takeharu also describes his feelings over succeeding and failing in his high school classes, since his friends would cheat off of his work, …
Takeharu Inouye (ddr-densho-365-15)
img Takeharu Inouye (ddr-densho-365-15)
Takeharu Inouye stands in front of a US Army Corps of Engineers Building, and visits friends on their crabbing boat along the waterfront.
Crabbing and Picnicking (ddr-densho-365-14)
img Crabbing and Picnicking (ddr-densho-365-14)
Takeharu Inouye and wife Setsuko Inouye eat outside at a picnic table (top) and sit together in a boat while Setsuko holds up a crab (bottom).
War Department Notification of Personnel Action (ddr-densho-365-6)
doc War Department Notification of Personnel Action (ddr-densho-365-6)
This Notification of Personnel Action from the War Department granted Takeharu Inouye a probational appointment as a warehouse laborer in Ogden, Utah. Takeharu hoped to find work when he moved with his family to Utah after their internment in Tule Lake during WWII.
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