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32 items
Japanese Americans waving good-bye (ddr-densho-36-63)
img Japanese Americans waving good-bye (ddr-densho-36-63)
The Puyallup Assembly Center housed primarily Japanese Americans from Seattle, Washington. It was open from April 28 to September 23, 1942. Most of the Japanese Americans from the Puyallup Assembly Center were later sent to the Minidoka concentration camp in Idaho.
Shizuko and Shigenori Oiye Collection (ddr-densho-350)
Collection Shizuko and Shigenori Oiye Collection (ddr-densho-350)
The Shizuko and Shigenori Oiye Collection consists of photographs, works of art, correspondence, and documents related to the Oiye's life in Tacoma, Washington before the war, their removal to Tule Lake concentration camp, and their return to Seattle, Washington post-war. Included are drawings and paintings done by Shigenori Oiye while he was at Tule Lake, some …
Warren Koichi Suzuki Interview (ddr-densho-1000-410)
vh Warren Koichi Suzuki Interview (ddr-densho-1000-410)
Nisei male. Born February 27, 1921, in Seattle, Washington. At age ten, was sent to Japan to live and attend school. Returned to Seattle prior to World War II. During the war, was removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Answered "no-no" on the so-called "loyalty questionnaire" and was transferred …
Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-85)
doc Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-85)
Excerpt: "When it's all over, I think I shall write my memories, entitled 'Life on the Tail of a Comet'!"
Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-84)
doc Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-84)
Excerpt: "First - here are some war stamps which I accumulated at a staff party some time ago."
Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-91)
doc Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-91)
Excerpt: "Just a hasty note to tell you I've had to move to the YW Residence -- at least temporarily."
Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-88)
doc Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-88)
Excerpt: "Second, if you haven't already, will you send the pictrues of Pooch to Ren? I'd like him to see 'my baby.'"
Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-90)
doc Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-90)
Excerpt: "What a lot has happened since four years ago today! It makes the past week seem rather paltry!"
Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-83)
doc Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-83)
Excerpt: "At long last I seem to have enough time -- and paper -- to bring us up to date."
Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-92)
doc Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-92)
Excerpt: "I'm under the dryer again, but this time it's in a beauty shop owned by a couple of girls who graduated from Hunt H.S. I like it much better."
Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-87)
doc Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-87)
First page missing. Excerpt: "We are both delighted to be able to stay and see the work through, but sorry to miss Thanksgiving and Christmas at home."
Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-86)
doc Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-86)
Excerpt: "I'm on the train from Portland to Seattle and will get this off to you before I get behind. I'm having a wonderful time in the Northwest!"
Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-89)
doc Letter from a camp teacher to her family (ddr-densho-171-89)
Excerpt: "Last Friday afternoon -- evening -- Elmer and I were invited to turkey dinner at the Nakahaharas."
Letter from Issei man to his family (ddr-densho-25-67)
doc Letter from Issei man to his family (ddr-densho-25-67)
After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the FBI under the Department of Justice began arresting aliens of Japanese, German, and Italian ancestry. These aliens, although they had not been charged with specific crimes, were considered "dangerous" by the U.S. government, and were interned in special Justice Department camps.
Letter to the Editor of the Wall Street Journal (ddr-densho-274-141)
doc Letter to the Editor of the Wall Street Journal (ddr-densho-274-141)
Letter written by Tomio Moriguchi in response to an editorial entitled "Keep Internment Interred."
Letter regarding a campaign against use of the term
doc Letter regarding a campaign against use of the term "Jap" (ddr-densho-274-6)
Letter from Shosuke Sasaki to Raymond Okamura regarding the revival of a campaign against publishing companies for their use of "Jap." In the 1950s and 1960s, Mr. Sasaki was the leader in a movement against the use of the word "Jap" in movies and print media.
Letter regarding JACL involvement in campaign against the term
doc Letter regarding JACL involvement in campaign against the term "Jap" (ddr-densho-274-7)
Letter from Shosuke Sasaki to Raymond Okamura. In the 1950s and 1960s, Mr. Sasaki was the leader of a movement against the use of the word "Jap" in movies and print media.
Letter:
doc Letter: "Efforts to Circumvent Individual Reparations Payments" (ddr-densho-274-9)
Open letter from the Seattle Evacuation Redress Committee refuting the arguments against individual redress payments.
Letter:
doc Letter: "Case for Individual Reparations Payments" (ddr-densho-274-10)
Open letter from the Seattle Evacuation Redress Committee arguing for individual redress payments.
Letter regarding the dictionary definition of
doc Letter regarding the dictionary definition of "Jap" (ddr-densho-274-5)
Letter from Shosuke Sasaki to Ben Nakagawa of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) urging the JACL to take up the campaign against publishing companies for their use of the word "Jap."
Letter regarding JACL involvement in campaign against the term
doc Letter regarding JACL involvement in campaign against the term "Jap" (ddr-densho-274-8)
Letter from Shosuke Sasaki to Clifford Uyeda. In the 1950s and 1960s, Mr. Sasaki was the leader of a movement against the use of the word "Jap" in movies and print media.
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