Bruce T. Kaji Interview I Segment 14

Father's immigration to the United States (ddr-densho-1000-289-1) -
Parents' early life in the U.S. (ddr-densho-1000-289-2) -
Raising animals for food (ddr-densho-1000-289-3) -
Adopting an English name in junior high school (ddr-densho-1000-289-4) -
Community activities: Boy Scouts and Nisei Week (ddr-densho-1000-289-5) -
Playing the bugle (ddr-densho-1000-289-6) -
Parents' role in the prewar Japanese American community (ddr-densho-1000-289-7) -
Attending high school, participating in sports (ddr-densho-1000-289-8) -
Hearing about the bombing of Pearl Harbor as a high schooler: "We were lost" (ddr-densho-1000-289-9) -
Preparing for mass removal: burning possessions (ddr-densho-1000-289-10) -
First impressions of Manzanar: "it was very primitive" (ddr-densho-1000-289-11) -
Witnessing the so-called "Manzanar riot" (ddr-densho-1000-289-12) -
Remembering music in camp with Louis Frizzell (ddr-densho-1000-289-13) -
Participating in a camp band, the Jive Bombers (ddr-densho-1000-289-14) -
Involvement in camp activities: the Manza-Knights and school newspaper (ddr-densho-1000-289-15) -
Breakdown of family traditions in camp (ddr-densho-1000-289-16) -
Working in the camp hospital (ddr-densho-1000-289-17) -
Applying to leave camp for college (ddr-densho-1000-289-18) -
Leaving camp temporarily to work on a farm (ddr-densho-1000-289-19) -
Leaving camp and attending college (ddr-densho-1000-289-20) -
Drafted into the army, joining the Military Intelligence Service (ddr-densho-1000-289-21) -
Working odd jobs while serving in the military: pin-setter in a bowling alley (ddr-densho-1000-289-22) -
Shipped overseas with the military (ddr-densho-1000-289-23) -
Serving as a translator during the war crimes trials in Japan (ddr-densho-1000-289-24) -
Returning home after military service (ddr-densho-1000-289-25) -
Social activities after the war (ddr-densho-1000-289-26) -
Difficulty finding a job amidst anti-Japanese sentiment (ddr-densho-1000-289-27) -
Reflections (ddr-densho-1000-289-28) -
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ddr-densho-1000-289-14 (Legacy UID: denshovh-kbruce-01-0014)

Participating in a camp band, the Jive Bombers

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

00:02:29 — Segment 14 of 28

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July 28, 2010

Densho Visual History Collection

Densho

Courtesy of Densho

ddr-densho-1000-289

Bruce T. Kaji

Bruce T. Kaji Interview I

02:59:42 — 28 segments

July 28, 2010

Los Angeles, California

Nisei male. Born May 9, 1926, in Los Angeles, California. Grew up in Los Angeles and was in high school when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. During the war, removed to the Manzanar concentration camp, California. Left camp to attend Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa, then was inducted into the army. Joined the Military Intelligence Service and served in Japan during the U.S. occupation as an interpreter for the war crimes trials. Returned to Los Angeles and established Merit Savings Bank, later becoming involved in the redevelopment of Little Tokyo. Mr. Kaji is one of the key founders of the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles.

(This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)

Martha Nakagawa, interviewer; Dana Hoshide, videographer

Densho

Courtesy of Densho

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