Concentration camps

The War Relocation Authority (WRA) oversaw construction of ten concentration camps in sparsely populated and isolated areas. Between June and October 1942, Japanese Americans were transferred from the "assembly centers" to the larger camps. Housing approximately 120,000 people, the camps were designed to be self-contained communities, complete with hospitals, post offices, schools, warehouses, and residential areas. The WRA attempted to establish normalcy by setting up newspapers, a degree of self-government, sports leagues, and social events. But confinement, monotony, and harsh conditions exacerbated tensions between pro- and anti-camp administration residents and between the disempowered Issei and their U.S.-born Nisei children. At several centers, conflicts erupted into violence and at the Manzanar concentration camp the unrest resulted in fatal shootings. The WRA gradually granted work and school leave to those they considered "loyal." The last camp closed in March 1946.

World War II (231)
Concentration camps (1454)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Concentration Camps, U.S.A. (book), Gila River, Heart Mountain, Jerome, Manzanar, Minidoka, Poston (Colorado River), Psychological effects of camp, Rohwer, Sites of incarceration, Topaz, Tule Lake

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1454 items
Photo of barracks in winter (ddr-densho-483-501)
img Photo of barracks in winter (ddr-densho-483-501)
Black and white photo of a row of barracks under a dusting of snow
Photo of a camp (ddr-densho-483-493)
img Photo of a camp (ddr-densho-483-493)
Black and white photo of a camp facility with a watch tower in the foreground
Photo of a woman with two children outside a barrack (ddr-densho-483-41)
img Photo of a woman with two children outside a barrack (ddr-densho-483-41)
Black and white photo of a woman with two children standing outside a barrack. Caption on reverse reads "Summer 1944" written in pencil.
Letter from Tomoye to Henri Takahashi (ddr-densho-410-107)
doc Letter from Tomoye to Henri Takahashi (ddr-densho-410-107)
Concerning a woman who cheated her father out of some money, and how daughter Martha (nicknamed Pinkie) is doing.
Chimata Sumida holding his grandson (ddr-densho-379-668)
img Chimata Sumida holding his grandson (ddr-densho-379-668)
Chimata Sumida holding his first grandson, Todd Endo, in front of their barracks.
Family portrait (ddr-densho-379-734)
img Family portrait (ddr-densho-379-734)
Family photo in front of their barracks: Chimata Sumida, Masako Sumida, Alice Yuriko Endo, Grace Sumida, Emmy Ito, Marshall Sumida, Tets Sumida, Marjorie Yohko Sumida, and Todd Endo (front)
Children by sandbox (ddr-densho-379-707)
img Children by sandbox (ddr-densho-379-707)
The caption in the photograph album reads "Sandbox". Todd Endo and friend Tonko in sandbox built by his father Aiji Endo at Rohwer Incarceration Center.
Mothers and their babies from Block 7, Rohwer Relocation Center (ddr-densho-379-691)
img Mothers and their babies from Block 7, Rohwer Relocation Center (ddr-densho-379-691)
The caption in the photograph album reads "Block 7 Babies". Rohwer Relocation Center Block 7 mothers and their babies.
Sumida family portrait in front of barracks at Rohwer Relocation Center (ddr-densho-379-399)
img Sumida family portrait in front of barracks at Rohwer Relocation Center (ddr-densho-379-399)
The Sumida family (left to right), Chimata Sumida, Masako Sumida, Alice Yuriko Sumida Endo, Grace Sumida, Emmy Sumida Ito, Marshall Sumida, Tetsuro Sumida, Marjorie Yohko Sumida, with Todd Endo in the front.
WRA Camp office (ddr-densho-379-629)
img WRA Camp office (ddr-densho-379-629)
Frank Aiji Endo is sitting on right side behind the desk. The stamp on the back of the photograph reads "Credit Line War Relocation Authority photo no. 210-G-12E-387 in the National Archives".
Group Photo of Block 7 of Rohwer Relocation Center (ddr-densho-379-736)
img Group Photo of Block 7 of Rohwer Relocation Center (ddr-densho-379-736)
Group Photo of Block 7 of Rohwer Relocation Center; label: "Note: Service Place"
Emmy Sumida Ito in front of her barrack door at Amache Relocation Center (ddr-densho-379-683)
img Emmy Sumida Ito in front of her barrack door at Amache Relocation Center (ddr-densho-379-683)
Written below the photograph "Hi family! Love Emmy 1-10-'43" Emmy Sumida Ito was incarcerated with her husband, Ken Ito, at Amache while the rest of her family was incarcerated at Rohwer.
Sumida and Shimidzu families (ddr-densho-379-666)
img Sumida and Shimidzu families (ddr-densho-379-666)
The caption on the page of the photograph album is "Rohwer 1942". Chimata Sumida and his family with sister Kimi Sumida Shimidzu and her family
Sumida and Shimidzu family portrait (ddr-densho-379-406)
img Sumida and Shimidzu family portrait (ddr-densho-379-406)
The Sumida and Shimidzu families pose outside at Rohwer Relocation Center.
Rohwer Relocation Center barracks (ddr-densho-379-676)
img Rohwer Relocation Center barracks (ddr-densho-379-676)
Rohwer Relocation Center rows of barracks on either side of dirt road
Photo of a camp (ddr-densho-483-495)
img Photo of a camp (ddr-densho-483-495)
Black and white photo of a camp facility with a water tower taken from a distance
Group photo near barracks (ddr-densho-483-440)
img Group photo near barracks (ddr-densho-483-440)
Black and white photo of a group standing near a camp barrack
Photo of a camp barracks (ddr-densho-483-494)
img Photo of a camp barracks (ddr-densho-483-494)
Black and white Photo of a camp barracks taken from a distance
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