Religion and churches

Religion and churches played an important role in the formation and development of West Coast Japanese American communities. While Buddhism is frequently seen as most prominent, Christianity was also influential. Initially focused on helping new male immigrants adjust to life in the United States, churches soon began catering to increasing numbers of families. By the mid-1930s, Japanese Americans' religious affiliations were split fairly evenly between Christianity and Buddhism.

Religion and churches (228)

228 items
An Oral History with Seiko Ishida (ddr-csujad-29-11)
av An Oral History with Seiko Ishida (ddr-csujad-29-11)
Retired Kibei teacher recounts samurai parents' background and their immigration to Seattle, Washington; socioeconomic composition of Seattle's Japanese community; earlier teacher training; prewar stays in Japan as a child and as a tutor in a missionary family; experiences as a teacher in the wartime resettlement in New York; and postwar return to Los Angeles. This oral …
An Oral History with Craig Kei Ihara (ddr-csujad-29-1)
av An Oral History with Craig Kei Ihara (ddr-csujad-29-1)
Oral history with Craig Kei Ihara, Sansei and California State University, Fullerton philosophy professor, born at the Rohwer incarceration camp, Arkansas discusses family history, focusing on religion, education, aspirations, and cultural heritage; and recent overnight stay at old Rohwer campsite. This oral history was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project for the Center for …
Community celebration (ddr-densho-25-95)
img Community celebration (ddr-densho-25-95)
This photo was taken at the White River church.
The Seattle Buddhist Church (ddr-densho-36-45)
img The Seattle Buddhist Church (ddr-densho-36-45)
The Seattle Buddhist Church was located at 1020 South Main Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi (Japantown) area.
Bukkyo Fujinkai members in front of Seattle Buddhist Temple (ddr-densho-38-14)
img Bukkyo Fujinkai members in front of Seattle Buddhist Temple (ddr-densho-38-14)
Members of the Bukkyo Fujinkai (Women's Buddhist Association) in front of the Seattle Buddhist Temple at 1020 Main Street. The Seattle Buddhist Church, now known as the Seattle Buddhist Temple, is currently located at 1427 South Main Street.
Seattle Buddhist Temple dedication service (ddr-densho-38-7)
img Seattle Buddhist Temple dedication service (ddr-densho-38-7)
The Seattle Buddhist Church was located at 1020 Main Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi (Japantown) area. The church, now known as the Seattle Buddhist Temple, is currently located at 1427 South Main Street.
Issei making sushi (ddr-densho-38-10)
img Issei making sushi (ddr-densho-38-10)
Issei members of the Bukkyo Fujinkai (Buddhist Women's Association) making sushi for the church bazaar. Left, front row: Mrs. Yamanaka, Mrs. Fukei, Mrs. Mizuta, Mrs. Takahashi, Mrs. Aoyama, Mrs. Tsuye, Mrs. Teramoto, Mrs. Shimokon, and Howard Sakura. Left, back row: Mrs. Nagamatsu, Mrs. Hashimawari. unidentified, Mrs. Watanabe, and unidentified. Right, front row: Mrs. Yasui, Mrs. Kihara, …
Reverend and Bukkyo Fujinkai members (ddr-densho-38-11)
img Reverend and Bukkyo Fujinkai members (ddr-densho-38-11)
The newly formed Bukkyo Fujinkai (Buddhist Women's Association) with Reverend Hoshin Fujii (front row, third from left).
Obutsudan enshrinement processional (ddr-densho-38-3)
img Obutsudan enshrinement processional (ddr-densho-38-3)
In 1933, an obutsudan and accessories were donated by a group started by Miyakichi and Kazuichi Terao and Kenichi Masuda. This procession made its way from the Terao brothers' residence at 10th Avenue and Lane Street to the Seattle Buddhist Church at 1020 Main Street. The Seattle Buddhist Church, now known as the Seattle Buddhist Temple, …
Buddhist procession (ddr-densho-38-2)
img Buddhist procession (ddr-densho-38-2)
In 1933, a Butsudan and accessories were donated by a group started by Miyakichi and Kazuichi Terao and Kenichi Masuda. This is the procession that made its way from the Terao brothers' residence at 10th Avenue and Lane Street to the Seattle Buddhist Church at 1020 Main Street. The Seattle Buddhist Church, now known as the …
Group in front of Seattle Buddhist Temple (ddr-densho-38-8)
img Group in front of Seattle Buddhist Temple (ddr-densho-38-8)
The Seattle Buddhist Temple was located at 1020 Main Street. Reverend Hoshin Fujii pictured in the front row, center, served the church from 1908 to 1922. The Seattle Buddhist Church, now known as the Seattle Buddhist Temple, is currently located at 1427 South Main Street.
Seattle Buddhist Church picnic (ddr-densho-38-21)
img Seattle Buddhist Church picnic (ddr-densho-38-21)
Reverend Y. Shimizu issuing prizes at the Seattle Buddhist Church picnic. (Identification on front of the photograph.)
Bukkyo Fujinkai members eating (ddr-densho-38-12)
img Bukkyo Fujinkai members eating (ddr-densho-38-12)
Issei members of the Bukkyo Fujinkai (Buddhist Women's Association) eating a meal in the Seattle Buddhist Temple kitchen. Seated (left to right): Cho Goto, Hanako Sao, Kikue Takahashi (behind Sao), unidentified, Taka Toshi, unidentified, Sasae Watanabe, unidentified, Kikue Hirata, Rieko Shimizu, and Fuiko Nakano. Standing: unidentified (back to camera), Kikuyo Tsuye, and unidentified.
Bukkyo Seinenkai (ddr-densho-38-5)
img Bukkyo Seinenkai (ddr-densho-38-5)
The Bukkyo Seinenkai marked the beginning of the Seattle Buddhist Church. It was established by Chojiro Fujii and Jiro Iwamura on November 15, 1901, to meet the varied needs of Issei immigrants. By 1902, this small house at 624 Main Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi was being rented for church services. The Seattle Buddhist Church, now known …
Seattle Buddhist Church picnic (ddr-densho-38-22)
img Seattle Buddhist Church picnic (ddr-densho-38-22)
This picnic was held at Lincoln Park. Back row (left to right): unidentified, Molly Fukutani, and Harue Mori. The child in front is unidentified.
Seattle Buddhist Church picnic (ddr-densho-38-24)
img Seattle Buddhist Church picnic (ddr-densho-38-24)
Reverend Ishikawa playing a game at this picnic, which was held at Lincoln Park. (Identification on front of the photograph.)
Seattle Buddhist Church altar (ddr-densho-38-1)
img Seattle Buddhist Church altar (ddr-densho-38-1)
Altar of the Seattle Buddhist Church, which was located at 1020 Main Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi area. The Seattle Buddhist Church is now known as the Seattle Buddhist Temple and is currently located at 1427 South Main Street.
Seattle Buddhist Church (ddr-densho-38-4)
img Seattle Buddhist Church (ddr-densho-38-4)
The Seattle Buddhist Church was dedicated at its 1020 Main Street address in Seattle's Nihonmachi on November 15, 1908. The Seattle Buddhist Church, now known as the Seattle Buddhist Temple, is presently located at 1427 South Main Street.
Reverend and Bukkyo Fujinkai members (ddr-densho-38-13)
img Reverend and Bukkyo Fujinkai members (ddr-densho-38-13)
Bukkyo Fujinkai (Buddhist Women's Association) members with Reverend Hoshin Fujii (front row, center) in front of the Seattle Buddhist Church at 1020 Main Street. The Seattle Buddhist Church is now known as the Seattle Buddhist Temple and is currently located at 1427 South Main Street.
Muneage ceremony (ddr-densho-38-6)
img Muneage ceremony (ddr-densho-38-6)
This building at 1427 South Main Street was the second location of the Seattle Buddhist Church. During the muneage ceremony, mochi (Japanese rice cakes) were thrown to church members from the scaffold.
Card from the American Friends Service Committee (ddr-manz-4-14)
doc Card from the American Friends Service Committee (ddr-manz-4-14)
Caption: "With the good wishes of the / American Friends Service Committee / (Quakers) / 20 South 12th St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania."
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