Japanese Latin Americans

During World War II, 2,264 Latin Americans of Japanese ancestry were forcibly deported from their countries of residence and taken to the U.S. where they were placed in internment camps in order to be exchanged for Americans held by Japanese forces. Some 80 percent of the internees were Japanese Peruvians; the rest came from various Pacific-facing countries from Mexico to Chile. At the conclusion of the war, most of the interned Japanese Latin Americans were forced to leave the U.S. However, since many were initially barred from returning to their home countries, more than 900 Japanese Latin Americans were deported to war-devastated Japan. Over 350 Japanese Latin Americans remained in the U.S. and fought deportation in the courts. Eventually, about 100 managed to gain reentry to their home countries in Latin America. It was not until 1952 that those who stayed were allowed to begin the process of becoming U.S. permanent residents. Many later became U.S. citizens.

Japanese Latin Americans (89)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Japanese Latin Americans

89 items
Atsumi Ozawa Interview Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-348-7)
vh Atsumi Ozawa Interview Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-348-7)
Father goes into hiding, fearing he is on a government "black list"

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the …

Art Shibayama Interview Segment 44 (ddr-densho-1000-151-44)
vh Art Shibayama Interview Segment 44 (ddr-densho-1000-151-44)
Talking with congresspeople in Washington, D.C.; rejecting the U.S. government's settlement amount
Art Shibayama Interview Segment 43 (ddr-densho-1000-151-43)
vh Art Shibayama Interview Segment 43 (ddr-densho-1000-151-43)
Involvement in the Campaign for Justice, an effort to obtain redress for Japanese Latin Americans
Art Shibayama Interview Segment 15 (ddr-densho-1000-151-15)
vh Art Shibayama Interview Segment 15 (ddr-densho-1000-151-15)
Relationship between the Japanese Peruvians and Japanese Americans in camp
Art Shibayama Interview Segment 9 (ddr-densho-1000-151-9)
vh Art Shibayama Interview Segment 9 (ddr-densho-1000-151-9)
Terrible conditions on U.S. transport ship: taken to the United States, but not understanding why
Art Shibayama Interview Segment 14 (ddr-densho-1000-151-14)
vh Art Shibayama Interview Segment 14 (ddr-densho-1000-151-14)
Learning English from a Japanese American Nisei; finding out that Peru didn't want the Japanese Peruvians to return
Art Shibayama Interview Segment 8 (ddr-densho-1000-151-8)
vh Art Shibayama Interview Segment 8 (ddr-densho-1000-151-8)
Grandparents deported to Peru after the bombing of Pearl Harbor; rest of family taken away by ship
Art Shibayama Interview Segment 42 (ddr-densho-1000-151-42)
vh Art Shibayama Interview Segment 42 (ddr-densho-1000-151-42)
Feelings upon finding out that redress would be denied to Japanese Latin Americans
Art Shibayama Interview Segment 45 (ddr-densho-1000-151-45)
vh Art Shibayama Interview Segment 45 (ddr-densho-1000-151-45)
Thoughts on the importance of fighting for redress for Japanese Latin Americans
Elsa Kudo Interview Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-388-10)
vh Elsa Kudo Interview Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-388-10)
The journey by boat the U.S.: mother begs an American soldier for milk for her infant

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect …

Elsa Kudo Interview Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-388-7)
vh Elsa Kudo Interview Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-388-7)
Vivid memories of the day of her father's arrest

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the …

Elsa Kudo Interview Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-388-6)
vh Elsa Kudo Interview Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-388-6)
Father is arrested by the FBI during World War II

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of …

Elsa Kudo Interview Segment 14 (ddr-densho-1000-388-14)
vh Elsa Kudo Interview Segment 14 (ddr-densho-1000-388-14)
Being labeled "illegal entry" by the U.S. government

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

Tetsujiro
vh Tetsujiro "Tex" Nakamura Interview Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-263-12)
First hearing about the Japanese Peruvians

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

Betty Morita Shibayama Interview Segment 40 (ddr-densho-1000-152-40)
vh Betty Morita Shibayama Interview Segment 40 (ddr-densho-1000-152-40)
Decision to not accept the Japanese Peruvians' settlement, and, with others, sue the government for redress
Betty Morita Shibayama Interview Segment 39 (ddr-densho-1000-152-39)
vh Betty Morita Shibayama Interview Segment 39 (ddr-densho-1000-152-39)
Husband is denied redress as a Japanese Peruvian and begins to speak at public venues
API