Puyallup (Camp Harmony)

Temporary Assembly Center

More information in the Densho Encyclopedia ...

Topics
Format
Genre
Usage

Use <Ctrl> or (⌘) keys to select multiple terms

281 items
Camp Harmony news-letter, vol. 1, no. 12 (August 14, 1942), souvenir edition (ddr-csujad-55-2520)
doc Camp Harmony news-letter, vol. 1, no. 12 (August 14, 1942), souvenir edition (ddr-csujad-55-2520)
Newsletter published at the Puyallup Temporary Assembly Center, also known as "Camp Harmony." Articles cover Minidoka incarceration camp, center news and events, and several illustrations of Camp Harmony facilities and buildings. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: sac_jaac_2627
An oral history with Victor
av An oral history with Victor "Ferrell" Kambe (ddr-csujad-29-34)
An oral interview with Victor "Ferrell" Kambe, an incarceree at the Puyallup Assembly Center. The interview was conducted for the Japanese American Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. Transcription is found in the item: csufccop_jaoh_0120. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: 2268_T01
In front of the Puyallup Assembly Center memorial (ddr-densho-10-229)
img In front of the Puyallup Assembly Center memorial (ddr-densho-10-229)
Caption on reverse: "L-R: Henry Miyatake, pioneer, Seattle redress activist, Cherry Kinoshita, JACL Redress Video Project Chair, John Esaki, producer/director, Visual Communications, in front of George Tsutakawa Puyallup monument at Puyallup faigrounds."
Envelope sent to an assembly center (ddr-densho-13-13)
doc Envelope sent to an assembly center (ddr-densho-13-13)
This envelope contained a letter sent by Yoshiko Tsuji Minato to Yoshi Asaba at the Puyallup Assembly Center.
Japanese American receiving lunch (ddr-densho-36-42)
img Japanese American receiving lunch (ddr-densho-36-42)
The assembly center was composed of blocks, each with its own kitchen and dining area.
Baggage arrival at assembly center (ddr-densho-36-41)
img Baggage arrival at assembly center (ddr-densho-36-41)
The Puyallup Assembly Center, also known as "Camp Harmony," was located at the Puyallup fairgrounds. The center was open from April 28, 1942, through September 23, 1942. Most camp inmates were from Seattle, Washington.
Japanese American washing clothes (ddr-densho-36-36)
img Japanese American washing clothes (ddr-densho-36-36)
The Puyallup Assembly Center was composed of a number of blocks. Each block had a communal washroom, such as the one shown here.
Barracks interior (ddr-densho-36-39)
img Barracks interior (ddr-densho-36-39)
Barracks apartments were small--approximately 8 by 10 feet or 15 by 20 feet--and offered little privacy. Japanese Americans tried hard to make the stark apartments homier. They made furniture, such as the vanity table in this redecorated barracks apartment, which was constructed by hand from scrap lumber.
Group playing Ping-Pong (ddr-densho-36-37)
img Group playing Ping-Pong (ddr-densho-36-37)
Japanese Americans made every effort to lead normal lives in the Puyallup Assembly Center. They cultivated gardens, engaged in different types of activities, and played games such as ping-pong.
Japanese Americans walking between barracks (ddr-densho-36-40)
img Japanese Americans walking between barracks (ddr-densho-36-40)
The Puyallup Assembly Center, also known as "Camp Harmony," was on the racetrack of the Puyallup fairgrounds. The center was open from April 28, 1942, through September 23, 1942. Most camp inmates were from Seattle, Washington. This is a view of the barracks that housed them.
Group playing Monopoly (ddr-densho-36-38)
img Group playing Monopoly (ddr-densho-36-38)
Japanese Americans did their best to lead normal lives in the Puyallup Assembly Center. They cultivated gardens, engaged in different types of activities, and played games such as Monopoly.
Puyallup Assembly Center (ddr-densho-36-43)
img Puyallup Assembly Center (ddr-densho-36-43)
The Puyallup Assembly Center, also known as "Camp Harmony," was on the racetrack of the Puyallup fairgrounds. The center was open from April 28, 1942, through September 23, 1942. Most camp inmates came from Seattle, Washington. This is a view of the barracks that housed them.
Japanese Americans cooking (ddr-densho-36-34)
img Japanese Americans cooking (ddr-densho-36-34)
The assembly center was composed of blocks, each with its own kitchen and dining area.
Japanese Americans waving good-bye (ddr-densho-36-63)
img Japanese Americans waving good-bye (ddr-densho-36-63)
The Puyallup Assembly Center housed primarily Japanese Americans from Seattle, Washington. It was open from April 28 to September 23, 1942. Most of the Japanese Americans from the Puyallup Assembly Center were later sent to the Minidoka concentration camp in Idaho.
Japanese American gardening (ddr-densho-36-35)
img Japanese American gardening (ddr-densho-36-35)
Japanese Americans tried hard to make life at the assembly center bearable. Here, a camp inmate tends to a garden.
Arrival at the Puyallup Assembly Center (ddr-densho-36-32)
img Arrival at the Puyallup Assembly Center (ddr-densho-36-32)
The Puyallup Assembly Center, which many camp inmates called "Camp Harmony," was on the site of the annual Western Washington Fair. The center was constructed in only seventeen days. Barracks were erected in converted livestock stalls near the parking lots and under the grandstand. Japanese Americans remained at the fairgrounds from April 28 to September 23,1942, …
API