Tule Lake

Concentration Camp

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Jewelry made in camp (ddr-densho-2-49)
img Jewelry made in camp (ddr-densho-2-49)
This corsage pin was made by Peggie Yorita, a Japanese American at the Tule Lake concentration camp. The flowers and leaves are composed of shells found at the camp. Tule Lake was drained in the early 1900s. The camp was located on the old lake bed, where people found shells for making jewelry to sell to …
Corsage made of shells (ddr-densho-2-4)
img Corsage made of shells (ddr-densho-2-4)
This corsage pin was made by a Japanese American in camp. The flower petals and leaves are made from various types of shells found at the camp. She used toothbrush bristles dipped in cornmeal for stamens and wound the stems by hand with fine green thread. Wire from screen windows was used to put the pin …
Japanese American and friend sifting for shells (ddr-densho-2-59)
img Japanese American and friend sifting for shells (ddr-densho-2-59)
Patsy Yorita (left) and Neal Frost, (son of a teacher at the Tule Lake concentration camp), sift dirt for shells. The shells were used by people in the camp to make jewelry. Tule Lake was drained in the early 1900s. The camp was located on the old lake bed, where people found shells for making jewelry …
Incarceree performing in camp parade (ddr-densho-2-23)
img Incarceree performing in camp parade (ddr-densho-2-23)
Patsy Yorita performing a flag salute at the Tule Lake concentration camp at the Independence Day parade.
Tule Lake concentration camp (ddr-densho-2-33)
img Tule Lake concentration camp (ddr-densho-2-33)
View of the Tule Lake concentration camp barracks. A rock formation that the inmates called "Castle Rock" can be seen in the background. After obtaining permission to go through the gates, people could climb to the top of the formation.
Japanese Americans digging for shells (ddr-densho-2-47)
img Japanese Americans digging for shells (ddr-densho-2-47)
These individuals are digging for shells to make jewelry, which was a popular pastime for many Japanese Americans in camp. Left to right: Kumataro Nishimura, Kadju Nishimura, Jimmie Yorita, Neal Frost (son of one of the teachers at Tule Lake), and Patsy Yorita. Tule Lake was drained in the early 1900s. The camp was located on …
Citizen's indefinite leave card (ddr-densho-126-4)
doc Citizen's indefinite leave card (ddr-densho-126-4)
A card given by the War Relocation Authority (WRA) to Nisei who were allowed to leave the camps indefinitely for work or school.
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