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            "public",
            "title",
            "description",
            "contributor",
            "creators",
            "creators.namepart",
            "facility",
            "format",
            "genre",
            "geography",
            "label",
            "language",
            "creation",
            "location",
            "persons",
            "rights",
            "topics",
            "image_url",
            "display_name",
            "bio",
            "extent",
            "search_hidden"
        ]
    }
}