GET /api/0.2/search/?fulltext=Minidoka+concentration+camp%2C+Idaho&page=56
HTTP 200 OK
Allow: GET, POST, HEAD, OPTIONS
Content-Type: application/json
Vary: Accept

{
    "total": 1392,
    "limit": 25,
    "offset": 1375,
    "prev_offset": 1350,
    "next_offset": null,
    "page_size": 25,
    "this_page": 56,
    "num_this_page": 17,
    "prev_api": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/search/?fulltext=Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho&limit=25&offset=1350",
    "next_api": "",
    "objects": [
        {
            "id": "77",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "0 1375/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/77/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/77/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/osue.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/osue.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/77/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Sue Takimoto Okabe",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born 1928 in Tacoma, Washington, moved with her family to Seattle at age four. At age six, began singing, taking voice lessons and performing on stage for Japanese American community events. In 1942, was incarcerated with her family at Puyallup Assembly Center and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, where she continued to sing -- including performances outside of the camp arranged by camp authorities. Remembers fondly the freedom from parental supervision teenagers experienced while in camp. In fact, after the family was allowed early release to relocate in Denver in April 1943, she ran away from home and briefly returned to Minidoka. In Denver, continued her music studies and joined a United Service Organization (USO) group, experiencing both racial prejudice and warm welcome at USO performances. Postwar, resettled with her family in Los Angeles, where she attended the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music, University of California, Los Angeles, and University Southern California. Continued to pursue music as a hobby through schooling, marriage, and two children. Began teaching private piano and voice lessons in 1952. Following her divorce in 1958, began singing in nightclubs and lounges."
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-136",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "1 1376/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-136/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-136/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-yjoe-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-yjoe-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Joe Yasutake Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born 1932 in Seattle, Washington. Father employed by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service as interpreter for twenty years, until separated from family on December 7, 1941 and interned as an enemy alien. Removed from Seattle with mother, sister and two brothers in 1942. Attended school (fifth through sixth grades) while incarcerated at Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, and U.S. Department of Justice internment camp at Crystal City, TX. Reunited with father, Jack Kaichiro Yasutake, who was transferred from the U.S. Department of Justice internment camp in Lordsburg, NM to Crystal City, TX camp in 1944. After release from Crystal City camp, moved with parents to Cincinnati, OH. Moved with parents to Chicago, Illinois where father served as Executive Director of the Chicago Resettlers Committee. After high school graduation, attended Lawrence College in Wisconsin. Graduated from University of Illinois. Commissioned as lieutenant, U.S. Army, 1954, assigned to artillery and served in Germany. Returned to U.S. in 1956, discharged from the army. Married, had three sons. Late wife died in 1984. Was remarried in 1988 and has one stepdaughter. Received M.A., New York University. Moved to Ohio, employed by U.S. Air Force as psychologist. Received Ph.D. in Industrial Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus OH. Moved to Denver, CO. Retired in 1986 from the U.S. Air Force Human Resources Laboratory. Moved to California, employed by Lockheed. Serves in a volunteer capacity with community organizations, including as president of the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and speaks at schools to educate students about the experiences of Japanese Americans and loss of constitutional rights during World War II. Also serves as chair of the San Jose Japantown Preservation Committee.<p>(Joseph Yasutake was interviewed together with his sister Mitsuye (Yasutake) Yamada and surviving brother, William Toshio Yasutake, in group sessions on October 8-9, 2002. He was also interviewed individually on October 9, 2002.<p></p>Before being contacted by Densho, the Yasutake siblings had planned to conduct their own family history interviews. Individually and jointly, they and other family members had written and gathered material documenting their family history. They shared much of this with me to assist with research and preparation for the Densho interview. Mitsuye's daughter Jeni had coordinated much of the family history work. Jeni participated as a secondary interviewer during the group sessions, October 8-9, 2002.<p></p>The group interview sessions were conducted in Seattle at the home of Tom Ikeda, executive director of Densho. The oldest Yasutake sibling, Reverend Seiichi Michael Yasutake, had passed away less than a year before the Densho interviewing, in December, 2001. The remaining siblings emphasized that his absence left a gap in their discussion of family history. In addition to Jeni Yamada and videographers Dana Hoshide and John Pai, also present during some portions of the group interview were Tom Ikeda, and Mitsuye Yamada's son Kai Yamada.)",
            "extent": "01:20:38",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-136",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 130,
                    "namepart": "Joe Yasutake"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Alice Ito"
                },
                {
                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "John Pai"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-yjoe-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "519",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "2 1377/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/519/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/519/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/yminoru.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/yminoru.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/519/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Minoru Yasui",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born October 19, 1916, in Hood River, Oregon. Earned a law degree from the University of Oregon law school and was practicing law prior to World War II. In 1942, deliberately defied the curfew imposed upon Japanese Americans in Portland, Oregon, and was arrested. His case was tried, and he was sentenced to one year in prison and given a $5000 fine. The appeal eventually reached the Supreme Court, which ruled that the government did have the authority to restrict the lives of civilian citizens during wartime. Yasui's fine was removed and he was released to the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. In the 1980s, his case was reopened under writ of error coram nobis, and 1986 his conviction was overturned by the Oregon federal court."
        },
        {
            "id": "131",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "3 1378/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/131/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/131/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ytosh.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ytosh.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/131/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Tosh Yasutake",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born 1922 in Seattle, WA. Father was employed by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service as interpreter for twenty years, until he was separated from family on December 7, 1941, and interned as an enemy alien. Graduated 1941, Cleveland High School, and attended University of Washington before being removed from Seattle with mother, sister and two brothers in 1942. Incarcerated at Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Worked as hospital attendant and laboratory technician in Minidoka. While incarcerated in Minidoka, volunteered for U.S. Army, March, 1943. Allowed to travel from Minidoka, with sister Mitsuye (Yasutake) Yamada, to visit their father, Jack Kaichiro Yasutake, incarcerated at U.S. Department of Justice internment camp in Lordsburg, NM. Mr. Yasutake passed away on December 12, 2016. After basic training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, served in Europe in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team as a medic assigned to Company I, 2nd Platoon. Wounded during combat in southern France, October, 1944. Awarded Bronze Star. After recovery, assigned as a medic to Anti-tank Company, 1st platoon. December, 1945 discharged from the army. After visiting parents and younger brother in Cincinnati and living briefly in New York City, returned to Seattle. Married. Received B.A., Zoology, from University of Washington. Began career in research on fish pathology. Had four children. Received Ph.D in Fish Pathology from the University of Tokyo. Retired in 1988 as Research Histologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, after 36 years. Continues to serve as a Senior Scientist Emeritus in a volunteer capacity. Dr. W.T. Yasutake is the author of numerous articles published in scholarly journals, and the book, Microscopic Anatomy of Salmonids. He received awards and recognition for his pioneering and outstanding contributions to his professional field."
        },
        {
            "id": "900",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "4 1379/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/900/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/900/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ddr-densho-1000-452_narr.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ddr-densho-1000-452_narr.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/900/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Bob Suzuki",
            "bio": "Nisei-han male. Born January 2, 1936, in Portland, Oregon, where father worked for the railroad. During World War II, removed to the Portland Assembly Center, Oregon, and the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. After leaving camp, family moved to a small community outside of Spokane, Washington, to farm. Went to UC Berkeley and Caltech, then taught at the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Southern California. He served as chair of the National Education Commission of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), and vice chair of the Community Advisory Committee for the Desegregation of the Pasadena Schools. Held several positions in academic administration including Dean of Graduate Studies and Research at California State University, Los Angeles, Vice President for Academic Affairs at California State University, Northridge, and President of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona."
        },
        {
            "id": "114",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "5 1380/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/114/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/114/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/kjohn.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/kjohn.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/114/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "John Kanda",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born July 10, 1925, in Seattle, Washington. Grew up in the Thomas-Auburn area of Washington. Following Executive Order 9066, family was removed to the Pinedale Assembly Center, then to Tule Lake concentration camp in California. Later transferred to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Volunteered as a replacement for the 100th/442nd Regimental Combat Team and trained thirteen weeks as light machine gunner replacement at Camp Shelby, Mississippi. Served with CO. L, 100th Bn/442nd Combat Team in Southern France and in Northern Italy as a rifleman 1st scout. Graduated from the University of Washington in 1950. Graduated from St. Louis School of Medicine in 1954. Internship and Resident, Pierce County Hospital, Tacoma, WA 1954-1956. Family Practice Medicine in Sumner, WA, 1956-1987. Served as president of the Puyallup Valley JACL for 2 terms. Served as Vice President National JACL from 1968-1970. Draft Board Member of the Eastern Pierce County from 1973-1976. President of Pierce County Medical Society from 1971-1972. Sumner Rotary Club President in 1971."
        },
        {
            "id": "129",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "6 1381/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/129/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/129/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ymitsuye.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ymitsuye.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/129/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Mitsuye May Yamada",
            "bio": "Female, child of Issei parents. Born July 5, 1923, in Fukuoka, Japan while her mother and two older Nisei brothers visited relatives. Named Mitsuye Mei Yasutake at birth. From age 3, grew up in Seattle, WA. Father employed by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service as interpreter for twenty years, until separated from family on December 7, 1941 and interned as an enemy alien. Attended Cleveland High School before being removed from Seattle with mother and three brothers in 1942, and incarcerated at Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Allowed temporary leave from Minidoka, to travel with brother William Toshio Yasutake to visit their father, Jack Kaichiro Yasutake, incarcerated at U.S. Department of Justice internment camp in Lordsburg, NM. Released from Minidoka in 1943 to work and attend college in Cincinnati. Received B.A. in English and Art from New York University. M.A. in English Literature and Research from University of Chicago. Married and had four children. Moved to Southern California in 1960. Taught for 23 years at community colleges in Southern California and other institutions, retiring from Cypress College as Professor of English in 1989. Author of Camp Notes and Other Poems, first published in 1976; Desert Run, (1988); writer of numerous other essays, short stories, and poems widely anthologized in collections such as This Bridge Called My Back (1981) and Women Poets of the World (1983). Featured in \"Mitsuye and Nellie: Two American Poets,\" documentary film on Asian women in the United States, aired on national public television, 1981. Founder of MultiCultural Women Writers (MCWW), member of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States (MELUS), and active in many community, arts and cross-cultural programs. Elected to National Board of Directors of Amnesty International USA in 1987 and served for six years. Recipient of numerous awards and honors recognizing her professional and volunteer contributions to society."
        },
        {
            "id": "59",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "7 1382/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/59/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/59/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/mhenry.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/mhenry.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/59/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Henry Miyatake",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born April 28, 1929, in Seattle, Washington. Incarcerated at Puyallup Assembly Center and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Had some key childhood experiences with discrimination that made him a self-described, \"independent thinker,\" and later, an influential figure in the Japanese American community. While a teenager in camp, he wrote and defended an essay criticizing the United States' treatment of racial minorities. His teacher refused to accept his paper, resulting in a failed grade and preventing him from graduating. Postwar, served in the U.S. Counterintelligence Corps, where he was privy to classified documents detailing the placement of spies in the incarceration camps. After leaving the military, he worked at the Boeing Company, where he fought against discriminatory workplace practices. He was also one of the earliest proponents of redress, doing the research, planning, and organizing for the \"Seattle plan,\" the first highly developed plan for obtaining redress from the U.S. government for the WWII incarceration of the Japanese American community."
        },
        {
            "id": "147",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "8 1383/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/147/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/147/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/kmarion.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/kmarion.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/147/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Marion Tsutakawa Kanemoto",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born December 30, 1927, in Seattle, Washington. Lived in Japan for fifteen months as a child, before returning to Seattle to attend junior high school. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, father was picked up by the FBI and taken to the Department of Justice camp at Missoula, Montana. Removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, before being reunited with father at the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Family volunteered to leave for Japan in 1943 on the U.S. government's \"exchange ship,\" the USS Gripsholm. Attended high school in Japan, and participated in military and air raid drills. During the U.S.'s postwar occupation of Japan, attended Doshisha University and worked for a U.S. army station hospital library. Returned to the U.S. and enrolled at St. Mary's teaching hospital in Rochester, Minnesota. Denied redress because of expatriation to Japan, but succeeded in obtaining redress in 1996 after filing a class-action lawsuit."
        },
        {
            "id": "894",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "9 1384/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/894/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/894/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ddr-densho-1000-445_narr.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ddr-densho-1000-445_narr.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/894/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Frank Sato",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born March 16, 1929, in Puyallup, Washington. Grew up in the Sumner, Washington, area, where parents had a produce business. During World War II, removed with family to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. After the war, attended the University of Washington and the University of Southern California. Established a career in government. From 1953 to 1965, he worked for the U.S. Air Force Auditor General's Office. From 1965 to 1974, he was with the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Comptroller). From 1974 to 1979, he was Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Audit. Became Inspector General at the Department of Transportation and was appointed Inspector General of the Environmental Protection Agency by President Ronald Reagan. After his government career, Frank served as president of the Japanese American Citizens League and worked as an activist during the redress movement."
        },
        {
            "id": "87",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "10 1385/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/87/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/87/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/snobu.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/snobu.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/87/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Nobu Suzuki",
            "bio": "Nisei female. November 25, 1909, in Seattle, Washington. Father established one of the largest oyster companies in the United States prior to World War II. Graduated from Garfield High School, the University of Washington, and then the Pacific School of Religion where she earned a master's degree in religious education. At the outbreak of WWII, assisted Nikkei who lost their jobs and worked with the WRA to help those families trying to relocate inland before the mass removal. Incarcerated at the Puyallup Assembly Center and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, with husband who served as one of the camp's physicians. While incarcerated, worked on the student relocation and job leave programs. Maintained an active involvement in the Young Christian Women's Association throughout the war, and postwar. Resettled first in Spokane, than later in Seattle. After the war, became active in a myriad of organizations, including, the national PTA, American Association of University Women, League of Women's Voters, and King County Medical Society's women's organization."
        },
        {
            "id": "121",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "11 1386/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/121/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/121/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/itsuguo.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/itsuguo.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/121/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Tsuguo \"Ike\" Ikeda",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born 1924 in Portland, Oregon. Incarcerated at the North Portland Assembly Center and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Kept a diary beginning December, 1941, and through incarceration. Beginning as a teenager, was exceptionally active as a volunteer leader, first within a Japanese American church in Portland, later in camp with Federated Christian Church, school and service clubs, and throughout life.\r\n Graduated from Hunt High School and left Minidoka on indefinite work leave. Drafted in 1944; graduated from United States Military Intelligence Service Language School. After discharge, returned to Portland, Oregon, and graduated from college in 1949. One of the earliest Nisei to obtain Master of Social Work degree from University of Washington, 1951. Married, 1951, and had four children.\r\n Incarceration led him to resolve to work for social justice. In 1953, was one of the first Nisei hired as executive director of a nonprofit organization in the United States (outside the Japanese American community), and served at the Atlantic Street Center in Seattle for 33 years, leading its transformation from settlement house to social service agency. Worked to reduce racial discrimination. Promoted multi-racial, cross-cultural cooperation, equal opportunity and affirmative action in community, church, nonprofit, government and other arenas. Mentors and advises community members, including sharing a set of principles he developed based on values from his cultural heritage. Mr. Ikeda is the recipient of numerous awards, recognitions of service and honors for his professional and volunteer contributions to society."
        },
        {
            "id": "209",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "12 1387/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/209/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/209/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/hhideo.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/hhideo.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/209/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Hideo Hoshide",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born September 25, 1917, in Tacoma, Washington. Grew up in Tacoma except for living in Japan for several years at age four. Attended the University of Washington in Seattle, majoring in Political Science, Far Eastern Studies, with a minor in journalism. Prior to World War II, worked as sports editor for community newspaper, The Japanese American Courier. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, was removed along with wife to Pinedale Assembly Center, California, and then Tule Lake concentration camp, California. Had a daughter in Tule Lake, and then moved to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Recruited to work for the U.S. Army's Office of Strategic Services (OSS), was drafted, and trained in India. After the end of the war, was sent to Hiroshima, Japan, to conduct a U.S. government survey studying the effects of the atomic bomb on Japanese citizens. Returned to Seattle in 1946 and was the associate editor for another community newspaper, The Northwest Times. Worked for the Boeing Company postwar while raising a family. Was a founding member of the Seattle Nisei Veterans Committee, working on the group's newsletter for thirty years."
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-129",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "13 1388/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-129/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-129/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-hbill-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-hbill-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Bill Hosokawa Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born in Seattle on January 30, 1915, and attended Washington grade school, Garfield High School and the University of Washington. He grew up as a typical Nisei, working summers in Alaska salmon canneries and Western Avenue produce brokerages to pay for his education. He became interested in writing at Garfield where he was sports editor of the school paper. While attending the University he worked at the weekly Japanese American Courier published by the late Jimmie Sakamoto. A faculty adviser at the University urged Hosokawa to drop out of the journalism school \"because no newspaper in the country would hire a Japanese boy.\" Hosokawa rejected the advice, but when he graduated in 1937 he found the professor was right. After working as a male secretary writing letters, Hosokawa and his bride, the former Alice Miyake of Portland, Oregon, went to Singapore in 1938 to help launch an English language daily. A year and a half later Hosokawa moved to Shanghai to work on an American-owned monthly magazine, the Far Eastern Review. Then, sensing the inevitability of war, he returned to Seattle in 1941 just five weeks before the attack on Pearl Harbor. When war came, Hosokawa served as executive director of Seattle JACL's Emergency Defense Council helping people in the community to cope. He and his family were removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington. When other Seattleites were moved to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, Hosokawa and his wife and infant son were sent to Heart Mountain, Wyoming. Later, he learned he had been separated from his Seattle friends because he was considered a potential troublemaker. He was in Heart Mountain for 14 months, working as editor of the camp newspaper, the Heart Mountain Sentinel, before being released to join the Des Moines, Iowa Register in 1943. In 1946 he moved to Denver to work on the Denver Post. In 38 years at The Post he held such assignments as executive news editor, assistant managing editor and Sunday editor. He covered the Japanese peace treaty in San Francisco in 1951, the Summit meeting in Paris in 1960 and the Zengakuren student riots in Japan that same year. He also had assignments as war correspondent in Korea and Vietnam, and for 17 years was editor of Empire, the Post's prize-winning Sunday magazine. For his last seven years at the Post Hosokawa was editor of the editorial page -- a Japanese American imprisoned during World War II as a potential security risk who now directed the opinion section of a major American newspaper. After retiring from the Post in 1984 he served the Rocky Mountain News as ombudsman columnist for seven years. Hosokawa has taught journalism classes at the University of Colorado, University of Northern Colorado and University of Wyoming. He wrote a weekly comment column called \\\"From the Frying Pan\\\" in JACL's weekly Pacific Citizen from 1942 until 1999. Among other honors, Hosokawa is a former president of the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors and a member of that organization's Hall of Fame, a charter member of the Denver Press Club Hall of Fame. He was named JACL's Nisei of the Biennium in 1958, and has published 12 books. Hosokawa and his wife Alice, who died in 1998, had four children.",
            "extent": "03:14:22",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-129",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 124,
                    "namepart": "Bill Hosokawa"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Alice Ito"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Daryl Maeda"
                },
                {
                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "Dana Hoshide"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-hbill-01-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-122-26",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "14 1389/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-122-26/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-122-26/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-hbill-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-122/denshovh-hbill-02-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Bill Hosokawa Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born in Seattle on January 30, 1915, and attended Washington grade school, Garfield High School and the University of Washington. He grew up as a typical Nisei, working summers in Alaska salmon canneries and Western Avenue produce brokerages to pay for his education. He became interested in writing at Garfield where he was sports editor of the school paper. While attending the University he worked at the weekly Japanese American Courier published by the late Jimmie Sakamoto. A faculty adviser at the University urged Hosokawa to drop out of the journalism school \"because no newspaper in the country would hire a Japanese boy.\" Hosokawa rejected the advice, but when he graduated in 1937 he found the professor was right. After working as a male secretary writing letters, Hosokawa and his bride, the former Alice Miyake of Portland, Oregon, went to Singapore in 1938 to help launch an English language daily. A year and a half later Hosokawa moved to Shanghai to work on an American-owned monthly magazine, the Far Eastern Review. Then, sensing the inevitability of war, he returned to Seattle in 1941 just five weeks before the attack on Pearl Harbor. When war came, Hosokawa served as executive director of Seattle JACL's Emergency Defense Council helping people in the community to cope. He and his family were removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington. When other Seattleites were moved to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, Hosokawa and his wife and infant son were sent to Heart Mountain, Wyoming. Later, he learned he had been separated from his Seattle friends because he was considered a potential troublemaker. He was in Heart Mountain for 14 months, working as editor of the camp newspaper, the Heart Mountain Sentinel, before being released to join the Des Moines, Iowa Register in 1943. In 1946 he moved to Denver to work on the Denver Post. In 38 years at The Post he held such assignments as executive news editor, assistant managing editor and Sunday editor. He covered the Japanese peace treaty in San Francisco in 1951, the Summit meeting in Paris in 1960 and the Zengakuren student riots in Japan that same year. He also had assignments as war correspondent in Korea and Vietnam, and for 17 years was editor of Empire, the Post's prize-winning Sunday magazine. For his last seven years at the Post Hosokawa was editor of the editorial page -- a Japanese American imprisoned during World War II as a potential security risk who now directed the opinion section of a major American newspaper. After retiring from the Post in 1984 he served the Rocky Mountain News as ombudsman columnist for seven years. Hosokawa has taught journalism classes at the University of Colorado, University of Northern Colorado and University of Wyoming. He wrote a weekly comment column called \"From the Frying Pan\" in JACL's weekly Pacific Citizen from 1942 until 1999. Among other honors, Hosokawa is a former president of the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors and a member of that organization's Hall of Fame, a charter member of the Denver Press Club Hall of Fame. He was named JACL's Nisei of the Biennium in 1958, and has published 12 books. Hosokawa and his wife Alice, who died in 1998, had four children.",
            "extent": "00:25:36",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-122-26",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 124,
                    "namepart": "Bill Hosokawa"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Frank Abe"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Frank Abe Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Salt Lake City, Utah",
            "status": "completed",
            "download_large": "denshovh-hbill-02-a.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": "130",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "15 1390/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/130/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/130/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/yjoe.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/yjoe.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/130/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Joe Yasutake",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born 1932 in Seattle, Washington. Father employed by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service as interpreter for twenty years, until separated from family on December 7, 1941 and interned as an enemy alien. Removed from Seattle with mother, sister and two brothers in 1942. Attended school (fifth through sixth grades) while incarcerated at Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, and U.S. Department of Justice internment camp at Crystal City, TX. Reunited with father, Jack Kaichiro Yasutake, who was transferred from the U.S. Department of Justice internment camp in Lordsburg, NM to Crystal City, TX camp in 1944. After release from Crystal City camp, moved with parents to Cincinnati, OH. Moved with parents to Chicago, Illinois where father served as Executive Director of the Chicago Resettlers Committee. After high school graduation, attended Lawrence College in Wisconsin. Graduated from University of Illinois. Commissioned as lieutenant, U.S. Army, 1954, assigned to artillery and served in Germany. Returned to U.S. in 1956, discharged from the army. Married, had three sons. Late wife died in 1984. Was remarried in 1988 and has one stepdaughter. Received M.A., New York University. Moved to Ohio, employed by U.S. Air Force as psychologist. Received Ph.D. in Industrial Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus OH. Moved to Denver, CO. Retired in 1986 from the U.S. Air Force Human Resources Laboratory. Moved to California, employed by Lockheed. Serves in a volunteer capacity with community organizations, including as president of the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and speaks at schools to educate students about the experiences of Japanese Americans and loss of constitutional rights during World War II. Also serves as chair of the San Jose Japantown Preservation Committee."
        },
        {
            "id": "124",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "16 1391/{'value': 1392, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "https://ddr.densho.org/narrators/124/",
                "json": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/124/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/hbill.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/hbill.jpg",
                "interviews": "https://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/124/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Bill Hosokawa",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born in Seattle on January 30, 1915, and attended Washington grade school, Garfield High School and the University of Washington. He grew up as a typical Nisei, working summers in Alaska salmon canneries and Western Avenue produce brokerages to pay for his education. He became interested in writing at Garfield where he was sports editor of the school paper. While attending the University he worked at the weekly Japanese American Courier published by the late Jimmie Sakamoto. A faculty adviser at the University urged Hosokawa to drop out of the journalism school \"because no newspaper in the country would hire a Japanese boy.\" Hosokawa rejected the advice, but when he graduated in 1937 he found the professor was right. After working as a male secretary writing letters, Hosokawa and his bride, the former Alice Miyake of Portland, Oregon, went to Singapore in 1938 to help launch an English language daily. A year and a half later Hosokawa moved to Shanghai to work on an American-owned monthly magazine, the Far Eastern Review. Then, sensing the inevitability of war, he returned to Seattle in 1941 just five weeks before the attack on Pearl Harbor. When war came, Hosokawa served as executive director of Seattle JACL's Emergency Defense Council helping people in the community to cope. He and his family were removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington. When other Seattleites were moved to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, Hosokawa and his wife and infant son were sent to Heart Mountain, Wyoming. Later, he learned he had been separated from his Seattle friends because he was considered a potential troublemaker. He was in Heart Mountain for 14 months, working as editor of the camp newspaper, the Heart Mountain Sentinel, before being released to join the Des Moines, Iowa Register in 1943. In 1946 he moved to Denver to work on the Denver Post. In 38 years at The Post he held such assignments as executive news editor, assistant managing editor and Sunday editor. He covered the Japanese peace treaty in San Francisco in 1951, the Summit meeting in Paris in 1960 and the Zengakuren student riots in Japan that same year. He also had assignments as war correspondent in Korea and Vietnam, and for 17 years was editor of Empire, the Post's prize-winning Sunday magazine. For his last seven years at the Post Hosokawa was editor of the editorial page -- a Japanese American imprisoned during World War II as a potential security risk who now directed the opinion section of a major American newspaper. After retiring from the Post in 1984 he served the Rocky Mountain News as ombudsman columnist for seven years. Hosokawa has taught journalism classes at the University of Colorado, University of Northern Colorado and University of Wyoming. He wrote a weekly comment column called \"From the Frying Pan\" in JACL's weekly Pacific Citizen from 1942 until 1999. Among other honors, Hosokawa is a former president of the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors and a member of that organization's Hall of Fame, a charter member of the Denver Press Club Hall of Fame. He was named JACL's Nisei of the Biennium in 1958, and has published 12 books. Hosokawa and his wife Alice, who died in 1998, had four children."
        }
    ],
    "query": {
        "query": {
            "query_string": {
                "query": "Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho",
                "fields": [
                    "id",
                    "model",
                    "links_html",
                    "links_json",
                    "links_img",
                    "links_thumb",
                    "links_children",
                    "status",
                    "public",
                    "title",
                    "description",
                    "contributor",
                    "creators",
                    "facility",
                    "format",
                    "genre",
                    "geography",
                    "label",
                    "language",
                    "location",
                    "persons",
                    "rights",
                    "topics",
                    "image_url",
                    "display_name",
                    "bio",
                    "extent"
                ],
                "analyze_wildcard": false,
                "allow_leading_wildcard": false,
                "default_operator": "AND"
            }
        },
        "aggs": {
            "facility": {
                "nested": {
                    "path": "facility"
                },
                "aggs": {
                    "facility_ids": {
                        "terms": {
                            "field": "facility.id",
                            "size": 1000
                        }
                    }
                }
            },
            "format": {
                "terms": {
                    "field": "format"
                }
            },
            "genre": {
                "terms": {
                    "field": "genre"
                }
            },
            "rights": {
                "terms": {
                    "field": "rights"
                }
            },
            "topics": {
                "nested": {
                    "path": "topics"
                },
                "aggs": {
                    "topics_ids": {
                        "terms": {
                            "field": "topics.id",
                            "size": 1000
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        },
        "_source": [
            "id",
            "model",
            "links_html",
            "links_json",
            "links_img",
            "links_thumb",
            "links_children",
            "status",
            "public",
            "title",
            "description",
            "contributor",
            "creators",
            "facility",
            "format",
            "genre",
            "geography",
            "label",
            "language",
            "location",
            "persons",
            "rights",
            "topics",
            "image_url",
            "display_name",
            "bio",
            "extent"
        ]
    }
}